Category: RC Boats

Model Warship Combat

Model warship combat is an international club activity, in which participants construct radio-controlled scale models of actual warships, most commonly those built by various nations during the early portion of the 20th century prior to 1946 such as the USS Des Moines, HMS Dreadnought or German battleship Bismarck. These models are armed with pneumatic cannons, and fight against one another on ponds and lakes. Model warship combat is sometimes considered to be a form of Naval Wargaming, but can also be considered a water-based version of Robot Combat since much of the internal systems and concepts are the same with similar radio control electronics, and in some cases possess similar pneumatics systems.

The sport is predominately divided into ‘Big Gun’ and ‘Fast Gun’ (or ‘Small Gun’) clubs. Both ‘Big Gun’ and ‘Fast Gun’ formats host annual national/international inter-club events. There is one major ‘Fast Gun’ club, the International Radio Control Warship Combat Club (IRCWCC). As of January 2015, the other major club, Model Warship Combat, Incorporated (MWCI) has been dissolved, and its members are being incorporated into IRCWCC. IRCWCC hosts a yearly week-long national event, “Nats”, where the fleets, divided up by historical alliances, (Allied and Axis), wage war against each other. Which ever team has the most points at the end of the week, wins that year’s Nationals. ‘Big Gun’ battlers have the annual event known as the North American Big Gun Open (NABGO),[1] and – since 2008 – the annual Big Gun Robotic Warship Combat open invitational at California Maker Faire.[2]
The Australian Battle Group (AUSBG) has two annual National Battles, held in January and June.              ship3 http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

History

Radio controlled combat of warships owes its popularity to a small group of men living in Texas (USA) in the late 1970s. The founding fathers of the hobby are Stan Watkins, D.W. Fluegel, and Jeff Poindexter. Back in the day, these men “toyed” with the idea of using radio controlled ships and equipping them with some kind of cannon so that they could then engage in combat.[3]

After much efforts, Stan created the “Mark I” cannon using an odd variety of plumbing parts and pieces. In those days, freon was used as a propelling agent and often their engagements resulted in little if any damage. After some time, and more engineering, they were able to “sink” an opponent in combat by shooting steel balls through balsa hulls. Organized groups formed very quickly after this achievement, with the formation of the IRCWCC, and Big Gun groups starting up in 1982 with the formation of NASWCA.[4]

Complete Mk I gun system 1977.

The iron pipe fittings formed the Freon 22 tank to power the gun operation. The small water valves were used to fill the tank and to supply pressure to the o ring “spool valve. When the gun was not in the fire position, the o ring separated the pressure source from the gun magazine hose. When the radio control unit was activated the servo moved the spool valve to the position that allowed the freon to flow from the tank to the gun magazine hose. As the magazine was pressurized, the BBs flowed into the restrictor tube until the pressure built high enough to force the BBs through the restrictor and out of the barrel. The exit velocity of the BBs was enough to enable the BBs to punch holes in the model ship’s 1/32 inch hull skin. This linear magazine and barrel assembly was not able to fit a small model ship’s gun turret. To improve scale appearance, a brass elbow fitting was added to reduce the above deck size of the gun. This enabled the magazine to exit the deck vertically into the base leg of the elbow. This was the reason for development of the new Mk II breach/barrel assembly. The first of these was installed on (Stan Watkins) earlier constructed model of the USS Arizona (l/144 scale). The BBs (about 100) were loaded into the clear hose. When the gun pressured the hose, BBs would feed into the smaller clear plastic tubing behind the barrel brass tubing. The pressure would build until the BBs could blast through the small (restrictor) tubing and out the barrel. At that point, they had adequate power to penetrate the 1/32 balsa hull skin. Numbers of BBs would “spurt” out. To get more than one spurt, the warship combatant had to rapidly close the spool valve after the start of the spurt. This was possible since the Freon feed hoses were small and had low flow.[5]

From this inauspicious beginning and after years of technological advances, the hobby has improved dramatically in both reliability and playability. Many different groups having formed, fighting scale model warships ranging from the reasonably rare 1:48 scale to the most common 1:144 scale, with different and largely regional variations on the rules used. ship2 http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

Design conventions and model construction

Extensive design conventions exist to provide that the fighting effectiveness under various conditions remain proportional to the prototype vessels. These conventions also dictate safety features [6] as well as mandating design features to allow for recovery of defeated vessels.[6]

The model warships are fully workable, with small electric motors or servo-operated sails for propulsion,[6]working steering systems actuated typically using servos, and are generally armed with self-reloading pneumaticcannons.

The models cannot be purchased as many scale models can, from a company, with everything in one box. They always include a degree of scratch building. There are, however, several suppliers that sell many of the necessary parts for construction. For example, Strike Models, and Battlers Connection.

Mechanical systems

While many models use a combination of switches and/or relays physically actuated by servos to control the propulsion system, most newer models now use either Electronic Speed Control units or solid-state switching boards such as those found in Robot combat, greatly reducing the complexity of the wiring of the propulsion system as well as overall complexity of design. Propulsion is achieved through the use of electric motors coupled to shafts passing through stuffing tubes driving semi-scale propellers. All active mechanical systems are required to be operated via electrical or pneumatic means. Banned are any and all mechanisms relying upon chemical combustion which could contaminate the water with fuels, oils, and other biologically toxic chemicals.[6]

Weapons systems

Cannons use steel balls ranging from .177″ to .25″ in diameter as projectiles, and typically CO2 or compressed air is used as the working gas for propellant. As of 2009, a small handful of small Big Gun ships were equipped with cannons powered by compression springs. In Big Gun combat, club rules frequently include provisions for the arming of torpedoes, represented through the use of fixed cannon firing 0.25″ diameter projectiles.[7]Although individuals have attempted to construct self-propelled 0.25″ diameter torpedoes, they have yet to be formally documented or demonstrated in use. Additionally, vendors have demonstrated working prototypes of weapons control systems suitable for Big Gun combat to enable multiple turrets on a single vessel to be coordinated as a single weapons battery to produce converging weapons fire at a given vector and range from the vessel so equipped. Pyrotechnics are specifically prohibited from use for weapons to protect the safety of people and animals in addition to preventing environmental contamination.[6]

Cannon types

  • Arizona Cannon/Single Barrel Gun System – easy to manufacture cannon named after one of the first model ships in which it was successfully implemented [8][9]
  • Ball-bearing interrupter – one or two steel balls in-line with the gas supply line interrupts the feed of ammunition into the breech, ensuring that only one projectile is fired at a time
  • JC White Rotating Cannon – first widely successful multi-barrel rotating turret [10]
  • JC White Torpedo cannon – similar to the rotating cannon without the rotating magazine on top [11]
  • Indiana Cannon – a refinement of the JC White Rotating Cannon [10] so named due to the US State in which it was first manufactured. Evolution of the JC White design into the Indiana Cannon marked the point at which the design encountered widespread adoption in the Big Gun format.
  • Jam elbow – [12]
  • Negative pressure/Quick Exhaust Valve – Typically uses a Clippard Exhaust Valve in its construction and relies upon a discharge of pressure from a pneumatic control circuit to actuate the cannon.[13]
  • O-ring breech –
  • Piston interrupter – a “piston” in-line with the gas supply line interrupts the feed of ammunition into the breech, ensuring that only one projectile is fired at a time[14][15]
  • Sliding breech –
  • Spring-loaded breech – [16]
  • Spring-fired/Spring-powered cannon – instead of directly utilizing exclusively compressed gas to impart kinetic energy to the projectile, a spring affixed to a piston to compress gas in a chamber or a spring directly acting on the projectile is used.
  • Spurt cannon – a spurt cannon is a type of fast gun cannon that lacks a mechanism to interrupt feeding of steel balls into the breech. Subsequently, it will continuously fire until either the supply of ammunition or compressed gas is depleted. ship 1 http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

Cannon configuration

  • Depressing – due to concerns for safety and the goal of inflicting damage to an opposing ship at or below the waterline, cannon can be configured to incorporate negative elevation with an adjustable mechanism
  • Fixed – Fixed cannon cannot be trained, requiring the captain to maneuver the ship to bring them to bear on a target instead.
  • Rotating – To enable a ship to bring the maximum possible firepower to bear on a given target, cannon can be equipped with a mechanism to facilitate rotation if the corresponding cannon on the real ship were so equipped. Additionally, cannon rotation permit a ship to continue to fire upon a target while maneuvering, potentially increasing the number of successful hits within a given period of time. While uncommon in Fast Gun due to a combination of complexity and limited tactical benefit, cannon rotation is common in the Big Gun format.[17]

Ammunition magazine configuration

  • Straight-magazine — Steel ball ammunition is housed in a relatively straight length of rigid or flexible tubing and can be gravity or force-fed into the cannon breech.
  • Coil-magazine – Ammunition is housed in tubing as with the straight-magazine configuration; however, the magazine tubing is tightly coiled, sometimes around the cannon riser and/or valve so as to reduce the longitudinal volume required for the cannon. Ammunition can be gravity or force-fed into the cannon breech.
  • Canister-magazine – In a canister-magazine configuration, ammunition is housed within a cylindrical chamber integrated into the cannon body. Ammunition is typically gravity-fed into the cannon breech.

Structure

While some early vessels were built in 1/150 scale, scales have become standardized with the most common construction scale of 1:144, although 1:96, 1:72 and 1:48 scale modeling groups also do exist. The majority of hulls are constructed from either fiberglass (with penetration windows cut into it), or scratch built with wood ribs. The exteriors of the ship’s hulls are sheeted with balsa wood, which allows the relatively low velocity cannon projectiles to penetrate them to let in some water, with the idea of sinking the model if the on board bilge pumps can’t compensate for the rate at which water enters the hull.[6] Superstructures are often constructed with a combination of lightweight wood, plastic sheet, thermoset plastic resins, and corrosion-resistant metals. Smaller vessels such as light cruisers and destroyers often incorporate less-durable but lighter superstructure construction in order to maximize the displacement available for weapons systems. Other than the balsa skin, the models typically escape real damage, and can be patched and turned around in typically 15–30 minutes.

Combat formats

Campaign

Instead of a single battle, multiple battles or sorties are combined to form a campaign of combat events, sometimes with a preceding battle dictating the available of rearming opportunities afforded to a team in the succeeding battle. A campaign can also consist of multiple objective-oriented battles or team free-for-all battles.

Free-for-all

Typically held in sessions divided by vessel combat units or combat value, during a free-for-all, each captain operates his or her vessel to sink or damage as many of the other vessels on the water as possible while minimizing the damage incurred. It is often played in a “last-man-standing” format where the winning vessel is identified simply as the last to sink or be disabled.

Objective

Objective format combat is typically executed in the form of a scenario, requiring that each team accomplish specific objectives to earn points and/or win the scenario. Such combat may involve sides of asymmetrical strength, such as when attempting to simulate a recreation of a historic battle.

Team free-for-all

A common combat format across the different model warship combat formats, team free-for-all involves the division of players present into two teams that are equal based upon a combat strength rubric (i.e. units in Fast Gun or a combination of displacement tonnage and cannon count in Big Gun) which then sortie against each other in accordance with the club’s rules and scoring system.

Club formats

Big Gun

File:NTXBG’s Richelieu and Missouri duke it out.JPG

NTXBG’s Richelieu and Missouriduke it out on the water

File:Kagero Stern Damage.jpg

Kagero (1/72 scale) stern damage

Unlike Fast Gun clubs, Big Gun clubs operate based upon a loose confederation, with each club reserving the ability to establish and maintain its own rules, provided that they coincide with the spirit of Big Gun Model Warship Combat. With versions in 1/48, 1/72, 1/96, and 1/144 scale, Big Gun Model Warship combat clubs have rules that make provisions for cannon caliber and armor thickness to be scaled according to that which existed on the prototype vessel. Big Gun Model Warships allow weapons to be installed in rotating turrets as they were mounted as the prototype historically.[6][18][19] Damage Control is accomplished via a centrifugal bilge pump capable pumping a regulated volume of water out of the hull. The volume allowed is based on the prototype ship’s displacement. Typically the flow rate varies from 30 gallons per hour (GPH) for the smallest ships to 90GPH for the largest ships.[6][18][19]

Big Gun clubs are largely descended from the now defunct “North American Warship Combat Association” (NASWCA) dating back to late 1981/early 1982.[3][4]

Fast/Small Gun

Principally known as Fast Gun by its members due to few restrictions on rate of fire, this format is sometimes also identified as Small Gun because of its exclusive use of .177″ (BB) caliber guns. About 80% of active clubs are of the fast gun variety, in which all ships are built in 1/144 scale and use .177″ caliber guns, which in most cases are installed in fixed mounts but may rotate depending upon ship class. Additionally, all ships are fitted with a standardized 1/32″ thick balsa wood ‘Armor’ to yield an easily penetrable hull. Damage control is accomplished through the use of centrifugal bilge pumps fitted with either a 1/8″ or 1/16″ diameter flow restricter. The clubs that follow this format of combat include the International Radio-Controlled Warship Combat Club (IRCWCC) and Model Warship Combat, Incorporated (MWCI).

A subset or adaptation of small gun is known as Treaty Combat. Treaty Combat, also abbreviated simply as Treaty, incorporates uniform caliber weapons, armor, and combat units in a way similar to that defined in IRCWCC or MWCI rules; however, speeds and pump capacities are limited based upon the prototype vessel and displacement, respectively. Thus, Treaty Combat incorporates some of the reduced-cost aspects of the Fast Gun format with some of the scaled characteristics of Big Gun.                   Credits: http://research.omicsgroup.org/index.php/Main_Page                                                                         http:// http://  Join Amazon Prime – Watch Thousands of Movies & TV Shows Anytime – Start Free Trial Now

Boating Racing Rules and Etiquette

Things You Should Know Before You Head to the Starting Line

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

Stirring up the local pond with your favorite RC boat is a great way to spend the day. Doing it with a friend or two is even better when you can race for bragging rights. If you and your buddies are the competitive types then naturally you’ll eventually want to find organized boat races in your area. Something to keep in mind is that two or three guys on a pond is very different from up to ten boats competing for first place on a larger course. Elsewhere in this issue of RC BOAT you will find information on what to expect when you show up at a race event. Here we will focus on some of the rules you will need to be aware of before you take your place on the starting line for the first time.

There are two sanctioned organizations for boat racing and we have provided you with links and QR codes for these groups within the graphics on the next page. IMPBA is the International Model power Boat Association. NAMBA is the North American Model Boat Association. Organized events are likely to follow the rules for one of these two groups. Their courses are similar in size with the main difference being the number of buoys used to mark the turns.

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

GET FAMILIAR WITH THE COURSE
It’s likely that you didn’t have any buoys or other markers to navigate around on your local pond so it may take some getting used to the fact that you now have “lanes” to constrain your driving path. You’ll want to arrive at the event early enough to get some practice time in before the heats begin. The races are run clockwise on an oval course. The turns are marked with either three or five buoys, depending on which rules are followed, with an “invisible” arc connecting them. Drive at no more than half throttle as you learn to judge the distance between your boat and the turn buoys. Ultimately you want to be as close to this “line” as possible without crossing it to avoid any penalties. Your boat must maintain a straight line from one turn to the next. Swerving may add a level of fun on the local pond, but can result in a penalty on a race course. Coming out of the corners be careful not to oversteer into the center of the course. Drive this until you are comfortable with how you handle the entire course.

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

DRIVE WITH THE PACK
It’s one thing to master the course when you are the only one on it. It is another thing to master it with other boats around you. It is important to keep an eye on where they are and stay in control of your boat while navigating through the wake of others’ boats. It’s time to hone your peripheral vision and reactionary skills. Start with just one or two other boats if possible. Try to enlist the help of some of the experienced racers. Most are likely to be willing to help a newbie. Drive the course while in close proximity of the other boat(s). Begin by first following slightly to the rear and off to the right. Keep your focus on your boat while observing, anticipating and reacting to the movements of the others. If they sweep wide on the turn you need to sweep just a bit wider. As the distance between boats becomes greater you still need to remain conscious of their locations. This is where peripheral vision comes into play. Eventually you want to be able to shift your vision to the other boat briefly while keeping your boat in your peripheral view, but this will come with experience. It is critical to be aware of what is in front of you and to the sides at all times. Don’t worry about what’s behind you. It’s the responsibility of the drivers behind you to pay attention to what is in front of them.

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

INVISIBLE LANES AND LEGAL PASSING
There are indeed lanes, however the lines defining them are imaginary. They are basically as wide as the boats that occupy them. You are at the mercy of the race officials when it comes to lane infractions. At any given time the boat closest to the buoys has the inside lane. You are permitted to pass this boat and overtake the inside lane but always pass on the left (outside) and do not pull in front of the other boat until you are at least three boat lengths ahead. Four or five boat lengths will help avoid a penalty call if the officials don’t see the same three boat lengths that you did.

Changing lanes behind other boats require focus. You will have the boat’s wake to deal with so you should cross it at about a 45 degree angle to avoid upsetting your craft. Avoid the rooster tail of water being showered your way as well as this has the potential to make your boat unstable not to mention the possibility of water getting into the hull. If another boat has passed you and enters your lane as it approaches the turn, you may need to throttle back to let him in. You always want to play nice because the table could be turned on the next lap.

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

RACING INFRACTIONS
There are several ways to be penalized. Many are going to be based on the officials interpretation of what they saw. You may not always agree but you always need to smile and nod then move on. Some of the infractions are described with the graphics on these pages. You can have a penalty called for something as simple as cutting a buoy on the turn or something more serious like running into a dead boat. Sometimes you can get away with a warning for a lane infraction if no other boat was affected. Again, it is up to the individual race official. Each organization has its own set of rules and penalties so it’s best to download their rule books and familiarize yourself with them prior to entering a race. The more you know going in, the better off you will be once your names is on the roster.

Boat Racing Rules and Etiquette

FINAL THOUGHTS
The bottom line here is that racing can be a fun part of any aspect of the RC hobby. Just as with car and truck races there are rules you need to know, some official and some are just commons sense. Practice driving close with your buddies on the local pond because proper control is only learned through experience. Keep an open mind and remember this is all about having fun with a little competition. After all…these are basically toy boats. Keep the stress low and the fun high. Now go race something!                                                                               Credits:  Tony Phalen & rcboatmag.com http://Red Line Remote Control http://

WL913 Brushless Boat High Speed Racing RC Boat

http://www.banggood.com/Wltoys-913-Brushless-Boat-High-Speed-Racing-RC-Boat-p-970794.html?p=ZF22172657341201509Aboat11  Description:
Item No.: WL913
Battery: 7.4V/11.1V 2700MAH
Charging time: Approx. 200mins
Playing time: Approx. 5mins
Controlling distance: 150m
Battery for controller: 1.5AA*4pcs
Product size: 62*26.2*14cm
Boat Weight:1000g
Frequency: 2.4G
Material: ABS, PA, PC
Color: Yellow

Feature:
The Max Speed: 13.8m/s(50km/H)
The longer working time of brushless motor
Water-cooling system makes the longer life of boat

Package Included:
1 × Brushless Boat
1 × Controller
1 × Instruction
1 × Charger
1 × Spare part kits
1 × Boat Battery   http:/

RC Recreation

 

  On a beautiful warm sunny day, spending time with your family and friends, what better way to fulfill that enjoyment than with a remote controlled boat & pickup truck at the lake. You’ll have hours of delight plus memories to cherish for a lifetime. http://                                 http://  http:// http://



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The only requirements are to charge the batteries and to ensure correct wiring. That’s pretty much it!

Rechargeable battery packs for RC vehicles can be typically either one of the following: NiCd, NiMH, or Li-Po cells. Following are more information on RC batteries.

Know your batteries

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