1/72 Scale Radio Controlled Electric-Powered Almost-Ready-to-Run US Fletcher Class Destroyer Kit

Big, bold, beautiful-just like the originals. Do you have what it takes to be a “Tin Can Sailor”? Tin Can Sailors fought the largest warships in the world with unarmored and lightly armed ships. Their Fletcher-Class Destroyers were tiny specks […]

FAZER Vei Fathom Blue 1970 Chevelle SS 454 LS6

One of the iconic muscle cars in American history is now part of the popular Fazer VEi line of brushless-powered, hobby-grade RC cars from Kyosho – the 1970 Chevy Chevelle SS! The Chevelle has always been part of the muscle […]

Rescue 17 Fireboat

Elevating Action on the Water There are those products that come to market that get you all riled up as if you were a kid again and what you see on these pages is sure to get you going. As […]

The Top 10 facts about RC toys and RC vehicles!

  http://Red Line Remote Control When it comes to RC toys, remote control toys, RC vehicles and remote control vehicles there are 10 really important things that everyone should know! This is especially the case if you are looking to buy […]

Take to the skies with Telemaster RC Airplane!

Flying remote control airplanes is an amazing hobby that is enjoyed by many people around the world. There is nothing quite like the freedom of the open skies, the adrenaline rush of your first take off, and the satisfaction of […]

 

RC Sailboating 101

A Basic Guide to Wind-Powered Boating                                                                    For anyone who might be interested in RC sailing it can sometimes be difficult to determine such things as what kind of sailboat to start out with, how to set it up and then how to best enjoy it on the water. Only a small percentage of hobby dealers are RC sailing savvy; so, this article will focus-on giving the novice sailor all of the information required to choose his/her’s first wind-powered marine craft.

SIZE/TRANSPORT NOTES
Since RC sail craft are available in many shapes that feature different mast/keel layouts, the beginner will need to first figure-out what size yacht will fit his/her lifestyle. If you have a small vehicle and limited storage space at home, a 20 to 30-inch long hull with an easily detachable mast/sails and a detachable lower keel may best suit your needs. If you choose a larger hull with an equally long mast and keel, it will take-up a lot more vehicle trunk volume; plus, more pre-sail assembly at the lake. Now if your local sailing location has any amount of submerged vegetation, a hull with a shorter-length lower keel will help prevent any weed buildup problems on the underside of the boat. As for the mast/sail layouts available, most kit/RTR boats use a two-piece mast to ease transport and the lower keel mounts in a recess in the hull bottom and it’s retained by a single thumb nut on the deck of the hull.sail1     KIT VS. RTR
Until recently the only way to start out in RC sailing would involve building a kit boat made-up from either a wood, fiberglass or molded plastic hull. Today both plastic and fiberglass RTR yachts are commonplace; so, you can now choose between constructing your first sail craft from a kit or by going with an almost-ready-to-run sailboat. If you’ve had some previous RC car/aircraft experience and have enough workspace, a sailboat kit from such companies as Victor Model Products, Thunder Tiger, Kyosho and Graupner can be built using regular hobby tools, adhesives and paints. To complete the majority of these kits you’ll only need to roundup a stick-style, two-channel surface radio with two servos, one of which will need to be a high-torque model to control the movement of the jib/main sails on the mast.servo1In the event you decide to go with a RTR sailboat, Pro Boat, AquaCraft and several of the kit makers listed above all sell preassembled yachts that are suitable for the novice sailor. In most cases, these RTR boats come from their boxes with only the need to install the pre-rigged mast and sails, attach the keel unit and assemble the hull’s support stand. Adding some batteries to the boat’s radio system will finish-up the yacht’s basic buildup as you can then check/trim the rudder and sail movements on the prepped hull. Once rigged at lakeside, you’ll want to make sure that all of the vessel’s mast and sail control lines are properly attached and tensioned as indicated in the owner’s manual. Then make a quick range check of the powered-up radio system to make sure that the sails and rudder run through their full range of motions. At this juncture you can launch your new sailboat and the fun of learning how to use the wind to “power” your hull can begin.                                                                     servo2A typical yacht’s onboard radio compartment will contain two servos, one of which will only need to be a regular-output unit for rudder control while the other will be a more high-torque servo to properly manage the movement of the sails.    First runs: Depending on the wind’s direction across the water you’ll find that by letting out the sails (moving the left stick on the transmitter upwards) will “catch” the air and this is what’s called running downwind or with the wind. To sail in the opposite direction (towards the wind) you’ll have to steer the hull at an angle to the air which is “tacking” and this technique will have less sail extension than the downwind transmitter stick settings. If you steer the boat’s bow directly into the wind it’ll likely just sit there which is to put the yacht “in irons” and the sailor will have to let the bow swing to one side to again get air in the sails. An important factor to sailing in either wind condition is that you must have enough forward hull speed to maintain the flow of water past the rudder blade as this will allow you to turn the hull whenever needed. It will take some time to master the balance between wind speed, sail settings and hull angles to the wind; but, in only a short time the novice will be able to maneuver his/her yacht no matter which direction the air is moving.                                                                                                   sail2Should you decide to put your yacht in competition, many sailboat clubs include kit and RTR hull classes in their race programs and with their sometimes tight rule packages you’ll have close racing like this in your future.              Sail support: Like all RC activities model sailing is more fun with a group of boaters and it’s not hard to locate other sailing enthusiasts that might reside near your home. The American Model Yachting Association’s website features a nice club directory to help you pinpoint and contact fellow sailors in your area and you can also use the site to help look for any yacht hardware or racing rules that apply to your brand boat. Custom sails, servos, etc. are all found in the suppliers listing while the rules guidelines section will tell just what modifications on your hull should you decide to try your hand at sailboat racing. Many current RTR and kitted sailing hulls regularly compete throughout the country and the sport sailor can learn a lot of useful running tips from those who race the very same sail craft as the one bought by the beginner. The adaptability of most RC yachts make them fun because both the sport and competitive sailor alike can upgrade their hull’s setup to improve the boat’s on water performance and do it for only a small outlay from their RC budget.sail3 When running your boat against the wind, moving the left stick downward on the transmitter will move the sails closer to the center of the hull and by combining this action with running the vessel sideways to the wind you’ll “tack” the sailboat until you’re ready to swing downwind again.                                                                                                                                                                             

SAIL POINTS
• Always apply a drop of CA glue to each rigging cord knot to prevent any mast/sail spillage in breezy conditions.

• When rigging the hull lakeside, keep the boat out of direct winds or simply lay it on the grass to avoid a blow over.

• Remember, a setup sailboat doesn’t like to be anywhere near a running ceiling fan.

• Braided fishing line (with the same outside diameter) can be used to repair/replace any mast or sail lines.

• Be sure to take a folding chair to the lake because the average yacht can sail for a minimum of two hours.

• Since most of a sailboat’s weight is in the keel, carrying it by the lower keel will be the most stress-free way to launch/retrieve it at the lake.                                                                                                                         WRAP UP
Equally suited to anyone looking for a quiet way to unwind from work or to experience a new style of RC boat racing, today’s selection of RTR/kit yachts can easily fit the requirements of the first-time sailor. Capable of conforming to any boater’s storage, transport and local sailing conditions a RC sail craft will only demand a simple cleanup and battery recharging between trips to the lake to enjoy some more wind-driven boating fun.trans1A regular two-stick surface transmitter is used to control sailboats with the left stick being used for sail movement while the right stick sends commands to the hull’s rudder blade.                                                     Credits: Tony Phalen and http://www.rcboatmag.com/  http:// http://

How to Start off With Flying RC Helicopters

Have you ever wanted to fly radio controlled helicopters, but never known how to start? This article contains everything you’ll need to know about flying an RC helicopter. It’s quite easy and fun once you get the hang of it. Read on to see how!                                                    

1

Start off with a 3 channel helicopter. These should be easy to fly and some can be flown inside. Most of these helicopters will be pretty small so do not fly them outside in the wind or else you can end up breaking your helicopter or someone else’s stuff or hurting someone. copter20

2

Don’t fly far away on your first flight and try to have a fair idea of the range.Before purchasing an RC helicopter model or toy make sure that you can use the frequency and that it won’t interfere with anything else or get interfered with. If this happens you can end up not being able to control your helicopter and it will do what it wants (which is most likely to crash without your knowledge). You can avoid this by buying a helicopter with a 2.4GHz radio, which does not suffer from interference by other sources.  copter21

3

Try to avoid buying a tiny little micro helicopter as the tail motors tend to wear out quickly and the batteries don’t last long.                                                                                                      copter22                                                                                                                      

4

Once you have mastered flying a 2 channel or a 3 channel you can upgrade by purchasing a 4 channel type helicopter.

    

RC Tank Wars

tank1 tank2

 

tank3

 

 

 

 

  

How to Fly a Quadcopter – The Ultimate Guide

How-to-Fly-a-Quadcopter-The-Ultimate-Guide-Cover-Image

This guide will show you how to fly a quadcopter, step-by-step.

Everyone goes through different struggles when piloting a quadcopter for the first time. UAV flying definitely has a learning curve.

So if you’re having trouble flying your quad, you’re just getting started, or you’re looking to hone your skills — don’t worry.

You’re in the right place.

No matter your quadcopter model, this guide will help you prepare for your first flight, stay safe, get airborne, and learn some basic and advanced quadcopter flying techniques.

Our goal is to give you a guide that will take out all of the guess work – from going through a pre-flight checklist, learning the controls, controlling your quadcopter’s flight pattern, and even some advanced techniques. Have fun!

Definitions

General terms:

Line of site – The pilot can see their quadcopter during flight.

FPV (First Person View) — The pilot can see where they’re flying through the UAV’s camera.

Parts:

Transmitter/Remote Control – The hand-held device that allows you to maneuver the quadcopter and adjust its settings.

Propellers – They spin according to the manual controls of the pilot. The intensity of the spin correlates to the intensity of the quadcopter’s movement.

Camera – Many quadcopters either come with a camera or allow the pilot to attach a camera to them. This is how pilots practice aerial videography and photography. (A camera came in second place when we interviewed UAV experts about their favorite drone accessory.)

(Note: For simplicity’s sake, this article assumes that the left stick controls yaw and throttle, and the right stick controls roll and pitch. Some transmitters allow the pilot to switch these controls based on what’s most comfortable.)

Roll – Done by pushing the right stick to the left or right. Literally rolls the quadcopter, which maneuvers the quadcopter left or right.

Pitch – Done by pushing the right stick forwards or backwards. Tilts the quadcopter, which maneuvers the quadcopter forwards or backwards.

Yaw – Done by pushing the left stick to the left or to the right. Rotates the quadcopter left or right. Points the front of the copter different directions and helps with changing directions while flying.

Throttle – Engaged by pushing the left stick forwards. Disengaged by pulling the left stick backwards. This adjusts the altitude, or height, of the quadcopter.

Trim – Buttons on the remote control that help you adjust roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle if they are off balance.

The Rudder – You might hear this term thrown around, but it’s the same as the left stick. However, it relates directly to controlling yaw (as opposed to the throttle).

Aileron – Same as the right stick. However, it relates directly to controlling roll (left and right movement).

The Elevator – Same as the right stick. However, it relates directly to controlling pitch (forwards and backwards movement).

Maneuvering:

Bank turn – A consistent circular turn in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Hovering – Staying in the same position while airborne. Done by controlling the throttle.

Figure 8 – Flying in a “figure 8” pattern.

Flight modes:

(Flight modes can typically be adjusted with certain buttons on your remote control/transmitter.)

Manual – Similar to flying a helicopter. Once you tilt the quadcopter (roll) it will not auto-level itself back to its original position. Even if you let go of the stick and it returns to the middle, the quadcopter will stay tilted.

Attitude (Auto-level) – Once the sticks are centered, the copter will level itself out.

GPS Hold – Returns the quadcopter’s position once the sticks have been centered. The same as attitude mode (auto-level) but using a GPS.

Quadcopter Controls

When learning how to fly a quadcopter, the controls will become your bread and butter.

They will become second nature once you know how they act individually and how they interact together to form a complete flying experience.

With any of these controls, the harder you push the stick, the stronger your quadcopter will move in either direction.

When you first start out, push the sticks very gently so the quadcopter performs slight movements.

As you get more comfortable, you can make sharper movements.

There are four main quadcopter controls:

  • Roll
  • Pitch
  • Yaw
  • Throttle

Roll, Pitch, Yaw, and Throttle of a Quadcopter - Image 1

Simple sketch of roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle on a transmitter (left image) and quadcopter (right image).

(Image source: Quadcopters Are Fun)

Let’s go through each of them.

Roll

Roll moves your quadcopter left or right. It’s done by pushing the right stick on your transmitter to the left or to the right.

It’s called “roll” because it literally rolls the quadcopter.

For example, as you push the right stick to the right, the quadcopter will angle diagonally downwards to the right.

Explaining a Quadcopter's Roll - Image 2

Example of a quadcopter rolling left and right. Notice the tilt of the quadcopter and the angle of the propellers.

(Image source: Best Quadcopter Spot)

Here, the bottom of the propellers will be facing to the left. This pushes air to the left, forcing the quadcopter to fly to the right.

The same thing happens when you push the stick to the left, except now the propellers will be pushing air to the right, forcing the copter to fly to the left.

Pitch

Pitch is done by pushing the right stick on your transmitter forwards or backwards. This will tilt the quadcopter, resulting in forwards or backwards movement.

Explaining a Quadcopter's Pitch - Image 3

Example of a quadcopter pitching forwards and backwards. Note that this view is from the left side.

Yaw

Yaw was a little bit confusing for me in the beginning. Essentially, it rotates the quadcopter clockwise or counterclockwise.

This is done by pushing the left stick to the left or to the right.

Check out the video below for an example.

(Watch from 3:00 to 3:40 and pay attention to how he adjusts the sticks.)

 

Yaw is typically used at the same time as throttle during continuous flight. This allows the pilot to make circles and patterns. It also allows videographers and photographers to follow objects that might be changing directions.

Throttle

Throttle gives the propellers on your quadcopter enough power to get airborne. When flying, you will have the throttle engaged constantly.

 

To engage the throttle, push the left stick forwards. To disengage, pull it backwards.

Make sure not to disengage completely until you’re a couple inches away from the ground. Otherwise, you might damage the quadcopter, and your training will be cut short.

Important note:

When the quadcopter is facing you (instead of facing away from you) the controls are all switched.

This makes intuitive sense…

  • Pushing the right stick to the right moves the quadcopter to the right (roll)
  • Pushing the right stick forward moves the quadcopter forward (pitch)
  • Pushing the right stick backward moves the quadcopter backward (pitch)
  • And so on.

So pay attention to that as you start changing directions. Always be thinking in terms of how the quadcopter will move, rather than how the copter is oriented towards you.

Getting to Know Your Remote Control/Transmitter

A transmitter is a hand-held controller that lets you pilot your quadcopter and control its flight pattern. When you make an adjustment with the sticks, it sends a signal to your copter telling it what to do next.

Check out this picture describing each part of the transmitter:
How-to-Fly-a-Quadcopter-Trasmitter-Labels-Image

(Image source: Alibaba)

Right Stick

The right stick controls roll and pitch.

In other words, it moves your quadcopter left/right and backwards/forwards.

Left Stick

The left stick controls yaw and throttle.

In other words, it rotates your quadcopter clockwise or counterclockwise, and it adjusts the height at which you are flying.

Trim Buttons

Each control has its own trim button, as you can see from the image below.

Trim Buttons on a Transmitter - Image

(Image source: Quadcopter 101)

When you first push your throttle to get your quadcopter off the ground, you may notice that the UAV automatically tilts and flies to one direction (or multiple).

This happens when the controls are unbalanced. To balance them out, certain controls need to be trimmed.

Check out the beginning of this video, where the pilot trims a few of his controls:

(Watch from 0:47 to 1:07)

 

If this happens, you can use the corresponding trim button to adjust the control’s natural intensity. This will stabilize the copter when pushing the throttle.

An Overview of the Main Quadcopter Parts

When learning how to fly a quadcopter, it’s important to understand the machine you’re commanding.

If something goes wrong, you want to be able to diagnose and fix the issue. You also want to understand the capabilities of each part and how they play into flying a quadcopter.

Here are the main parts of a quadcopter:

  • The frame
  • Motors
  • Electronic Speed Control (ESC)
  • Flight Control Board
  • Radio Transmitter and Receiver
  • Propellers
  • Battery and Charger

The frame connects all of the other components. For a quadcopter, it’s shaped in either an X or a + shape.

If you’re building your own quadcopter, you want to consider the size and weight of the frame and how it will affect your flying experience.

The motors spin the propellers. A quadcopter needs four motors, because one motor powers a single propeller.

The higher the kV, the faster the motor will spin. Kv is often quoted in RPM per volt, which means that a 1000 Kv motor on a 10V supply will rotate just under 10,000 rpm at no load.

Electric Speed Controls (ESCs) are wired components that connect the motors and the battery. They relay a signal to the motors that tells them how fast to spin.

At any one time, each of your motors could be spinning at different speeds. This is what lets you maneuver and change direction. It’s all conducted by the Electronic Speed Controls, so they’re very important.

The Flight Control Board is the “commander of operations”. It controls the accelerometer and gyroscopes, which control how fast each motor spins.

The radio transmitter is your remote control, and the receiver is the antenna on the copter that talks to the remote control. When you make an adjustment on the transmitter, the receiver is what understands that adjustment and sends it to the rest of the quadcopter system.

A quadcopter has 4 propellers, and each one helps determine which direction the quadcopter flies or whether it hovers in place.

The battery is the power source for the whole quadcopter. This needs to be charged and recharged, because without a battery, you cannot fly your quadcopter.

The charger charges your battery so you can take multiple flights.

(Pro tip: We recommend buying multiple batteries. This way, you won’t have to wait for the first battery to charge in order to take more flights. You can charge the first battery while you insert the second, third, fourth one, etc.)

The Pre-Flight Checklist (Do NOT Skip This)

Going through a pre-flight checklist will keep you and your copter safe.

It will also make sure you don’t waste time fixing components and getting things ready, when you could be having a blast flying your quad.

Here’s a checklist you can use before each flight:

  • If you have a camera, check that you have your micro SD card inserted.
  • Make sure the transmitter battery is charged.
  • Make sure the quadcopter battery is charged.
  • Insert the battery.
  • Make sure the battery is inserted securely.
  • Make sure each propeller is secure.
  • Check that there are no loose parts on the quadcopter.
  • Check for missing or loose screws.
  • Turn on the transmitter.
  • If your copter needs to calibrate and get satellite lock, wait until it finishes.
  • Make sure there is enough room for launch and flight.
  • Make sure the throttle (left stick) is all the way down.
  • Turn on the transmitter.
  • Back away 3 or 4 steps (or to a safe distance).
  • Keep facing the quadcopter the entire time.
  • Keep a direct line of site at all times when flying, so you can always see your quadcopter. You want to keep a direct line of site so you know when you’re about to crash. Also, sometimes, quadcopters can fly out of the range of the transmitter’s signal, which can cause your copter to fly off on its own (bye bye quadcopter). Keep the transmitter’s range in mind, and don’t let your quadcopter fly out of that range.

How to Fly a Quadcopter – Choosing a Place to Learn

Any UAV pilot will tell you that learning to pilot a quadcopter in an enclosed space is asking for something to go wrong – either with you, your belongings, or the drone itself.

As you get more experienced, and your control becomes natural, flying in tight spaces will be a cinch.

But as a beginner, choose a place that will minimize the impact any mistakes might have.

We suggest starting out in a large, open space, such as a park or a field. Many people prefer to learn on grassy ground, so if the quadcopter needs to make a crash landing, it will at least have some sort of cushion.

Next, stay away from people or animals. Any crashes could cause serious injury.

And finally, wind can be your worst enemy when learning the nuances of flying. To reduce the chance of flying in the wind, try to fly in the morning.

Important Safety Precautions

Quadcopters are basically flying lawnmowers.

They can be dangerous if not operated carefully.

Here are some quadcopter safety precautions to keep in mind:

  • If you’re about to crash into something, turn the throttle down to zero, so you don’t potentially destroy your quadcopter, injure somebody, or injure yourself.
  • Keep your fingers away from the propellers when they’re moving.
  • Unplug/take out the battery of the quad before doing any work on it. If it turns on accidentally and the propellers start spinning, you might have a tough time doing future flights with missing fingers.
  • If you’re a beginner learning to fly indoors, tie the quadcopter down or surround it by a cage.

    How to Get Your Quadcopter Off the Ground

    Alright! Now that you understand the controls and you’ve taken all of the right safety precautions, you’re ready to fly.

    To get your quadcopter in the air, the only control you need is the throttle.

    Push the throttle (left stick) up very slowly, just to get the propellers going. Then stop.

    Repeat this multiple times and until you’re comfortable with the throttle’s sensitivity.

    Slowly push the throttle further than before, until the copter lifts off the ground. Then pull the throttle back down to zero and let the quadcopter land.                                                                               (Watch from 1:15 to 1:40)

     

    Repeat this 3-5 times. Notice whether the copter is trying to rotate left or right (yaw), move left or right (roll), or move backwards or forwards (pitch).

    If you notice any movements happening without you making them happen, use the corresponding trim button to balance them out.

    For example, if you notice the copter moving to the left when you push the throttle, adjust the “roll” trim button next to the right stick.

    Keep adjusting the trims until you get a relatively stable hover off the ground by only using the throttle.

    Congrats! You know how to get your quadcopter airborne.

    Now, let’s learn how to hover in mid-air.

    How to Hover in Mid-Air and Land

    To hover, you will use the throttle to get airborne. You will then use small adjustments of the right stick to keep the quadcopter hovering in place.

    You may also need to adjust the left stick (yaw) slightly, to keep it from turning.

    Use the throttle to get the copter about a foot to a foot-and-a-half off the ground.

    Make tiny adjustments with the right stick (and the left, if necessary) to keep the copter hovering in position.

    When you’re ready to land, cut back the throttle slowly.

    When the quadcopter is an inch or two off the ground, go ahead and cut the throttle completely and let the UAV drop to the ground.

    Repeat this until you get comfortable hovering off the ground and landing gently.

    Flying Left/Right and Forwards/Backwards

    To fly a quadcopter left, right, forwards, and backwards, you will need to hold the throttle at a steady rate to keep it airborne. You will then use the right stick to maneuver the quadcopter in the direction you want it to go.

    First, bring your copter to a hover.

    Push the right stick forward to fly it a couple feet forward.

    Pull the right stick back to bring it back to its original position.

    Now, move it further backwards a couple feet, and return it to its original position.

    Push the right stick to the left to move your copter a couple feet to the left.

    Move it back to its original position, then fly it a couple feet to the right.

    If it starts to rotate (yaw), adjust the left stick to the left or right to keep the copter facing the same direction.

    (Pro tip: When you move in either direction, you will probably notice the quadcopter dropping in altitude. To keep the copter at the same altitude, push the throttle and give it more power whenever you turn or move.)

    How to Pilot Your Quadcopter in a Square Pattern

    You’ve gotten off the ground, and you know how to fly a quadcopter in the four basic directions.

    Now, it’s time to combine these skills and start flying in patterns. This will help you get a feel for simultaneously engaging the controls.

    To fly in a square pattern, keep the quadcopter facing away from you the entire time.

    Push the right stick forward (pitch) and fly forward a couple feet. Then, return the right stick to the middle and hover in place.

    Then push the right stick to the right (roll) and fly to the right a couple feet. Then, hover in place for a few seconds.

     

    Pull the right stick backwards and fly backwards a couple feet. Then, hover in place for a few seconds, and push the right stick to the left and return the quadcopter to its original position.

    You’ve just flown in a square! Keep doing this until you get comfortable with it, and then move on to our next pattern – flying in a circle.

    How to Fly a Quadcopter in a Circle

    This is where you will hone your simultaneous control skills.

    To fly a quadcopter in a circle, you will use pitch, roll, and throttle at the same time.

    As usual, use the throttle to get airborne. Then, decide whether you want to fly clockwise or counterclockwise.

    For this example, we’ll assume you’re flying clockwise (to the right).

    Keep the quadcopter facing away from you, and push the right stick diagonally up and to the right. This will engage both pitch and roll at the same time, and start flyinging the quadcopter in a circle to the right.

    After a couple feet, start rotating the right stick more to the right, so you engage more roll. This will start maneuvering your quadcopter to the right.

    After a few more feet, start rotating the right stick diagonally to the bottom right, and continue to circle the right stick around until the copter returns to its original position.

    Try changing directions, and slowly rotating the right stick to fly in a circle. If you notice the quadcopter starting to rotate and face different directions, adjust the quadcopter’s yaw by pushing the left stick to the left or right.

    How to Rotate (Yaw) Your Quadcopter

    To rotate your quadcopter, use the throttle to get airborne.

    Once at a comfortable hover, push the left stick in either direction. This will rotate the quadcopter in place.

    Rotate it 360 degrees. Then push the left stick in the opposite direction and rotate it 360 degrees the other way.

    Keep doing this until you’re comfortable with it.

    Flying a Quadcopter Continuously

    Flying a quadcopter continuously requires you to rotate and change directions simultaneously.

    This will take some getting used to, because the quadcopter will be facing different angles in relation to how you’re facing, so you will need to pay close attention to how each movement of the sticks will affect the quadcopter’s flight.

    First, take off and hover.

    Rotate (yaw) your copter to a slight angle.

    Use the right stick to fly it left/right and forwards/backwards. Get comfortable flying the quadcopter while it faces a different direction.

    Rotate it to another angle, and use the right stick to maneuver it again.

    Keep doing this until you’re comfortable flying at different angles.

    To fly continuously, slowly push the right stick forward.

    As you’re pushing the right stick forward, push the right stick slightly to the left or to the right at the same time.

    Fly in different directions by pushing the right stick forward (pitch) and adjusting it left and right, and using the left stick (yaw) to change the direction the copter is facing.

 

Then, try adjusting the quadcopter’s height by moving the left stick forward and backward (throttle).

Congrats! Now you know how to fly a quadcopter with continuous movement.

Keep practicing until you can direct your quadcopter at will. Then, move on to the next section, where we’ll discuss different milestones for you to shoot for.

Different Milestones to Pass

Use these milestones to keep you organized during the learning process.

They will help you gauge where you’re at and what you should be going for next.

  • Learn how the four main quadcopter controls – roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle – affect a quadcopter’s movement.
  • Understand the parts of your quadcopter and what each of them does.
  • Prepare a pre-flight checklist and go through it before each take off.
  • Understand the safety precautions.
  • Use the throttle to get airborne, and make any necessary adjustments using the trim buttons.
  • Get comfortable hovering in mid-air and gently landing your quadcopter.
  • Take off to an altitude of 3 feet and land in the same position.
  • Take off to an altitude of 3 feet and spin the UAV around 180 degrees.
  • Get comfortable flying your quadcopter left/right and forwards/backwards.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter in a square pattern.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter in a circle.
  • Learn how to rotate (yaw) a quadcopter.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter continuously.
  • Do all of the above, but at an altitude of 25 feet.

Beginner’s Quadcopter Flying Techniques

Here are some beginner flying techniques for you to master:

  1. Hover in place.
  2. Hover and rotate the quadcopter.
  3. Rotate the quadcopter to different angles, and fly it left/right and forwards/backwards until you’re comfortable flying a quadcopter without it facing the same direction as you.
  4. Fly your quadcopter in a square pattern.
  5. Fly your quadcopter in a circle.
  6. Fly at different heights.
  7. Pick two targets on the ground, and repeatedly land, fly, and land on each one.

Check out this video for an example of #7:

(Watch from 4:33 to 4:57)

And if you’re still struggling to get the hang of it, Korey Smith from My First Drone put together a useful bank turns video as well.

Next Steps

Congrats on finishing our “How to Fly a Quadcopter” drone pilot training guide! We hope it gets you on your way to flying a quadcopter like a pro.                                                                                                               Credits: http://uavcoach.com/  http:// http://

Owning And Operating A Nitro Powered Radio Controlled Car Or Truck

Nitro RC Cars

by :nitro1Owning and operating a nitro powered radio controlled car or truck adds an element of excitement and realism to this hobby above and beyond that provided by the electric RC counterparts. Unfortunately, it also poses some unique challenges. The one question that is posed to me the most often is ‘how do I start a gas powered RC car’?

Well, first of all, you need to assemble a few necessary items. These can be obtained either individually, or purchased as a package with or without your radio controlled car or truck. You will need the correct nitro fuel, a glow igniter, batteries for your radio transmitter and receiver, and a small screwdriver.

Have your glow igniter fully charged and ready to use. Make sure you have installed batteries in your controller (transmitter) and the car’s on board receiver. Verify that they are functioning properly by operating the steering, throttle and brake. After all, you want to be able to control your RC car once it is running! Fill the car’s fuel tank with the proper nitro fuel. Be careful  fuel is extremely flammable and toxic! Check with your engine’s manufacturer or your local hobby shop to make sure you are using the recommended nitro mix. 20% is the most popular. OK? Now we are ready to fire her up.

Clip the glow igniter to the glow plug located in the top of the engine cylinder head. Rotate the engine by whatever means your car or truck uses such as manual pull recoil, on board electric starter, drill operated shaft starter, or portable starter box. You may have to ‘choke’ the engine to initially supply fuel to the carburetor. You can easily do this by placing a finger over the exhaust outlet. Watch for fuel movement through the fuel hose so you know when fuel has reached the carburetor. You don’t want to flood the engine!

Once the engine has started and is running smoothly, you can remove the glow igniter. Drive easy for a few minutes until the engine warms up a little. After warm up you may find it necessary to adjust the carburetor high speed needle, low speed needle, or idle speed set screw to maximize performance.

This might all seem intimidating to you, but it really isn’t hard to learn with a little practice and patience. The sound of that high performance nitro engine springing to life makes it well worth the effort!
sources www.hobbiedown.com and actionvillage.com

Step 1: how to drive you Gas RC car.                                                   nitro2nitro3                      I no most people think its easy to drive but most do not.
Step1
Realize that your controller works just like the steering wheel on your regular car. When you move it to the left, your RC car moves to the left and when you push the controller to the right, your car moves to the right.
Step2
Drive as fast as you can the first few times you take your RC car onto a new track. This will help you get a feel for the track without worrying too much about making a mistake.
Step3
Stick to the middle of the track instead of trying to hug the edges. Your lap times might not be as good, but at least you won’t drive your RC car right into one of the track barriers.
Step4
Look for lines or the areas of the track where more experienced racers drive their cars. This should give you an idea on how to lower your lap times.
Step5
Draft with other cars just as you would if you were racing NASCAR instead of driving an RC car. Not only can you increase your speed, but you can also see where other cars are running and what spots drivers are avoiding.
Step6
Be consistent any time you drive your RC car. The more time you spend racing and practicing, the better you’ll get.
ive but most dont.

Step 2: gas rc car safey                                                                              nitro4nitro5nitro6Safety Issues and Rules for Responsible RC Car & Truck Operation
Be a safe, courteous, and responsible RC car or truck owner and operator. Protect yourself, those around you, and your RC vehicles by using common sense and following certain guidelines for safe use of radio controlled cars, trucks, motorcycles, tanks, bulldozers, and other RC ground vehicles.
Control Your Controller
Before you run your RC: Controller on first, vehicle on second. After you run your RC: Vehicle off first, controller off second.
Choose a Safe Area to Operate Your RC
Choose a safe, open area to operate your radio controlled vehicle. Avoid people and busy streets.
Check Your Frequency
Check your frequency and make sure no one in your operating area is using the same frequency at the same time you are.
Check for Obstacles Before Operating Your RC
Survey the area that you will be driving in and make sure it is clear of undesired obstacles… i.e. stumps, large rocks, puddles of water, or other obstructions.
Avoid Spinning Wheels
Do not pick up your vehicle while the tires are still moving.
Handle and Store Nitro Fuel Safely
Nitro fuel is highly flammable. Avoid open flames — including smoking — around nitro containers. Mark your container for identification.

Step 3: Nitro RC Operation And Maintenance                               nitro7Nitro RC Operation and Maintenance
A nitro RC has many more parts than most electrics. There are also specific operational and maintenance requirements from engine tuning, to break-in, to after-run maintenance. Learn how to keep your nitro RC glow engine at peak performance levels. And when your nitro engine won’t run, do some troubleshooting to isolate and fix the problem.
Nitro Troubleshooting @
Nitro Engine Break-in Procedure
Proper nitro engine break-in is critical for long-lasting performance of your RC. Every new nitro engine should undergo a break-in procedure. If you do nitro engine break-in properly, the up-keep on your RC vehicle is less costly than if the procedure is done hastly and incorrectly. Be patient.
Adding After-Burn Oil
After running your RC for a while you have to perform after-run maintenance. Part of that after-run maintenance includes lubricating the pistons and all the internal parts by adding after-burn oil to the engine cylinder head.

Step 4: Carb ajusting.nitro9nitro8                  How does the carburetor work and how do I adjust it?

We got the theory part of the engine under control. We can’t really tune a piston or adjust a crank-shaft, at least not in your every-day engine maintenance and adjustment. So without further delays lets dive into the 2nd phase of this project& The Carburetor. What good is a 1.2 HP engine if you can’t keep the dam thing running? That’s exactly my point, it does not matter how little horse power your engine has, if it can stay running for the entire duration of the main then you will have a real good change to at least get one of the top three positions. They say that before you can win a race -first you must finish. The first part of finishing a race it to have a well tuned engine. In this article we will go over how a carburetor works and how to adjust it. Without any further delays lets get busy!

Carburetor Theory

The carburetor has one main function, to regulate engine speed. It accomplishes this by metering the amount of air and fuel as required, to sustain combustion per the input of the throttle servo. Thus for a low-speed idle you would have a small amount of air and fuel entering the engine. This would in effect lower the chemical energy entering the combustion chamber and thus lessen engine power and subsequently lower the RPM. As we open the throttle the carb will allow more air and fuel into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine power and RPM’s (revolutions per minute). Now that we know what the carb. has to do lets explore the underlining fluid mechanic properties that allow the carb to function effectively at different throttle settings.

The Venturi-Effect

What allows the carb to pull fuel from the fuel tank is the venturi-effect. This states that in a converging funnel the entering fluid velocity increases as it passes through a reduction in the funnels throat diameter. This increase in fluid velocity decreases the localized pressure at the venturi throat to below atmospheric pressure. This low pressure region is precisely where fuel enters the carburetor throat. This is what allows the engine to “suck” fuel from the gas tank. The truth is that the venturi-effect is all that is needed for the engine to get fuel. Pressurizing the fuel tank is really only done to decrease the effects of fuel level on the mixture setting of the carburetor.

Fuel Metering Devices

The venturi-effect draws fuel from the tank but does little to regulate it’s flow. It’s true that as the engine accelerates the amount of air that moves through the engine increases. The increase in air velocity also increases fuel flow into the induction port, this helps the engine self regulate the fuel up to a certain point.

This is not the only means for the carburetor to meter air and fuel. Engines need a metering device to help regulate the amount of fuel that enters the carburetor. This is accomplished with an adjustable orifice, typically we call them needles or jets. Most engines have a second adjustable needle that helps regulate fuel at low throttle settings. By adjusting these two needles we can control the transition from low to high speed operation of the engine.

How do we adjust a carburetor?

The carburetor is typically adjusted with a long flat-head screw-driver. Carb adjustments are then done by rotating the needled in, our out of the needle seat. The idle speed is adjusted by a screw at the base of the carburetor. This allows the throttle barrel to only close to a preset position.

The carb has three main adjustments that allow you to set the following:

1. Set the idle speed.

2. Set the mixture at idle (Adjustable on 2-needle carbs only).

3. Set the high speed needle mixture and control engine temp

How to make carburetion adjustments:

Idle Speed:

The throttle stop screw or idle-speed screw (same thing) determines how far the carb barrel will be able to close when the servo is in the neutral position. Typically you set the servo/throttle linkage so that the carb will go from fully open when the trigger is fully pressed to fully closed when the trigger is in neutral. Then you would adjust the idle-stop/speed screw so that there is a 1-2 mm gap when the servo is in the neutral position. You might need to readjust the spring collars on the throttle linkage to force the throttle arm against the idle speed screw.

Tip#1: If you completely mess up the carb setting and you want to go back to the factory recommended needle setting then you must have the carb fully (Yes I mean fully closed) before you can set the low-speed needle to whatever turns the engine manufacturer suggests. Before you close the carb fully back the low-speed needle a bit to make sure you wont put un-needed stress on the needle seat.

Tip#2: There should be no speed change whatsoever when the car is in idle and when you hit the brakes. If the engine’s RPM drop either your linkage isn’t set right or the idle-speed screw is set too loose. Tighten clockwise until the carb barrel doesn’t move when you go from neutral to full brakes.

Tip#3: Some RTR kits have servo horns that are too small. There is not enough servo throw to open the carb barrel, if you use servo trim to be able to open the carb fully, then when you go to neutral the carb doesn’t close enough. To compensate for this the novice engine tuner opens up the low speed needle to drop the engine RPM so the car will stay still when at idle… The drawbacks of correcting the linkage problem with the mixture control is that now the low-speed is too rich and the car won’t idle for more than a couple of seconds before the engine sputters and dies.

To fix this problem you need to get an after market servo horn that is larger yet still fits your particular servo brand. Now you can go from fully open to fully closed, without using trim. Now you wont have to compromise the carb settings because of lack of servo throw.

Low-Speed Needle:

At this point you would start the engine warm it up and commence tuning. Adjust the low-speed needle clock-wise until the engine doesn’t sputter when at idle. You want a fast idle, if the car wants to move forward a lot, then turn the idle-speed screw counter clock wise to lower RPM until the engine just barely want to engage the clutch. It may take a little time to get the settings right.

Remember you want the fastest idle you can get away with. It will make the engine more stall proof. Some engine will overheat if the idle isn’t rich enough, you need to experiment to determine what’s the right setting for your particular engine. When every thing is set right the engine will be able to idle through an entire tank without missing a beat.

High-Speed Needle:

The high speed needle will control fuel flow into the carb from 1/2 to full throttle. Typically the high speed needle is set to allow the engine to reach it’s peak power point, then you open the needle slightly and go racing. On very hot and humid days you will probably have to make a compromise in the tuning department. For most this will mean you will richen up the high-speed needle to lower engine temperatures to acceptable levels. Everyone has their own interpretation of what an acceptable engine temperature is, for me anything under 260 is acceptable. Going higher will typically mean shorter engine life-span and less reliability.

Step 5: Glow Engine tuning basics                                                      nitro10nitro11                        Understanding Your Engine
The first and foremost consideration when attempting to tune your glow engine is understanding the basic parts and their functions. By understanding the fundamentals, you can better tune your engine for maximum performance while at the same time, expanding the life of your engine.

Carburetor
The carburetor is the mechanism that mixes fuel and air in very specific proportions and passes it on to the engine through the vacuum intake. The natural operation of the engines causes of flow of gases to pass through the engine (through the carburetor) and out the exhaust manifold and on to the pipe or muffler. The exact mechanism for this is unimportant for the scope of this tutorial, however it is important to realize that air and fuel pass into the engine by this vacuum method. Depending on how you adjust your carburetor, you can either adjust how much of this gas/air mixture reaches the engine and to what proportion of gas to air passes on to the engine. By reducing the amount of fuel per volume of air, you are making the mixture “lean” and by increasing the amount of fuel, you are making the mixture “rich”.

The two types of carburetors are slide and barrel. The old-style barrel carburetors still dominate the market because of their simplicity in design and because of the tendency for designers to hang on to legacy design. These have been around since the beginning of glow-fuel planes. They control gas/air flow by rotating a barrel with a hole cut in either side that allows varying amounts of gas/air mixture to flow through the carburetor as the hole opening enlarges to the venturi (air shaft down the center of the carb body).

Idle-Speed Adjustment
This is the most basic and easy to understand part of tuning your carburetor. This spring-tensioned screw limits the closure of the barrel aperture. Although this doesn’t affect the mixture of the fuel it does affect the idle speed. The more closed the aperture is, the slower the idle, the larger the aperture, the faster. As you close this aperture up and the idle speed decreases, you will eventually (sooner than later) stall the engine out. In order for the engine to run, it must have enough inertial energy built up in the engine and flywheel to carry it through the entire ignition cycle. Generally speaking, you want to adjust this down to the slowest idle, just before it begins to stall.

Low-End Mixture Adjustment
This adjusts the fuel mixture at or near idle. Some engines lack this low-end mixture valve for reasons of simplicity, however this makes accurate tuning difficult.

For barrel carbs, this mixture valve is generally found where the throttle-arm pivots. Some are countersunk, others are clearly visible from the outside. On slide carbs, they are generally found on the opposite side of the carb from the throttle slide shaft (has an accordion billow type rubber boot over it) next to, but below the fuel-inlet and high-end mixture valve.

High-End Mixture Adjustment
Also known as the Main Needle adjustment, this is the primary fuel mixture adjustment. This is generally found on the top end of the engine, typically next to where the fuel line goes into the engine. Some are flat-head screws like the low-end mixture, others are hand adjustable valves.

Tuning Basics

It’s important to understand that there is a reputation for glow-engines to be difficult to tune. This is a common error in thinking. With a little bit of know-how, tuning a glow engine can really be a simple, pain-free process. People that don’t properly understand the basics can easily become frustrated by what should be a simple, straightforward process. Here’s how you do it:

Dialing it In
For the purpose of this tutorial we are going to make some basic assumptions. First, we’re going to assume that the rest of your car or truck is properly functioning and that you have everything ready to go. Second, we’re going to assume that you are able to start your engine and that it at least runs for a second or so.

The first place to start with dialing in your engine is to make sure that you have your idle-speed properly adjusted. Your engine manual should give you specific instructions on setting the aperture gap to the minimum size. It’s important that we get this resolved before continuing on. If your engine can’t get enough air/gas flow then it won’t start/run. A clockwise rotation opens the aperture and increases the idle RPMs, a counterclockwise slows it down.

Second, you should tune the low-end mixture valve. This is done before the high-end (main needle) adjustment because an improperly adjusted low-end can affect the high-end performance. Like most mixture valves, clockwise rotation will “lean” the mixture and a counterclockwise will “richen” the mixture.

To determine whether the low-end mixture requires tuning, allow the engine to warm up completely, and then allow it to idle, uninterrupted for one full minute. If the engine continues to run after the minute is up then your low-end mixture is correct and you’re ready for the high-end adjustment. If it dies on you then there are two possibilities; either you are running too rich or too lean. To determine which is the case you must listen for how the engine dies in its idle test.

If the engine’s RPM’s rev up at the last second and then the engine dies than you are running too lean. To correct this, turn the low-end mixture screw counterclockwise (out) 1/8 of a turn (always make adjustments in 1/8 turn) and retry the idle test.

If, on the other hand, it begins to wind down and you notice a change in how the exhaust sounds in the last few seconds, then your engine is running too rich. To correct this, turn the low-end mixture screw clockwise (in) 1/8 of a turn and then retry the idle test.

Once you have passed the idle test and are able to idle for one full minute (after first warming the engine up, of course) you are ready to continue on. You may have to repeat the above process a few times until it is properly set. Remember, only adjust the screw 1/8 of a turn. It’s far too easy to go too far with the adjustment. Setting changes don’t always take effect immediately. You may have to run your engine for a few minutes for the full effect to take place.

Now that you have dialed in your low end, any carb mixture problems can be isolated to the high-end (main) mixture adjustment.

Acceleration is the tell-tale sign of how to tune your high end. If you hit the throttle and it takes off suddenly but then suddenly dies or loses power then you have your main mixture set too lean. Try backing (counterclockwise) the main mixture needle out 1/8 of a turn and retry. If it bogs immediately when you hit the throttle (sounds like it’s choking), then it’s most likely running too rich. Try leaning the mixture out by screwing the main mixture valve in (clockwise) 1/8 of a turn.

The more accurate way of really dialing in the top-end is to take the engine’s temperature. A properly tuned engine should run between 210� and 220� Fahrenheit. This can only really be ascertained by using and infra-red thermometer such as the type used by automotive mechanics. On-board or direct-transfer types that measure the heat from the head are inaccurate because, assuming the head is properly dissipating heat, it would reflect a lower than accurate temperature as a majority of the heat energy would be dissipated from the exposed surface of the head. By “looking” at the temperature near the core (actually, area immediately surrounding the glow plug) the temperature can be more accurately read.

The cheap but easy alternative would be to drop a bead of water down the head on the glow-plug and see whether it boils off. If it slowly simmers than it probably is running right around 212�. If it boils to quickly then it’s probably too lean and needs to be richened. If it just sits there and doesn’t boil at all, then its running too rich and needs to be leaned out.

An engine that is running too lean will run hotter and exceed the 220� degree limit. This can significantly reduce the life of your engine. Although it may be tempting to run your engine as lean as possible (does give a short-lived performance boost), this should only be done if you are very wealthy and like swapping engines out every race. There is no quicker way to kill and engine, honest. This is simply because as you lean the engine out, it gets less fuel to the engine, and more importantly, less lubricant. Since glow fuel is the only means of lubrication for your engine, the lack of it means certain death to your powerplant.

A few final do’s and don’ts…

    • Give your adjustments time to take affect. Remember that most adjustments won’t be immediately noticeable. You need to drive your engine through it’s full range for at least a minute. Make sure you make adjustments in 1/8 turn adjustments only!
    • Always run on the rich side. It’s far better to take a slight performance hit than to turn your engine into a paper weight. Running too lean may give you a temporary thrill, but it’s short lived. Your engine must get the proper amount of lubrication at all times.
    • Changes in temperature affect your tuning! Whenever the outside temperature changes you will most likely need to re-adjust your engine. Warmer temperatures require a leaner setting where colder temperatures require a richer setting.

 

I hope that this info gets you on the right track. If all fails, it’s always a good idea to get expert advice from the vets down at your local track. However, be aware of the guy that’s too eager to give you advice on how to get that extra performance boost out of your engine. Unless he or she plans on buying your next engine, I would be weary of any such advice.

Good luck!

Step 6: Engine Maintenance.                                                                nitro10nitro11                         day-to-Day Maintenance

There are three basic steps one should take on a day-to-day basis to ensure you continue getting the most from your engine:

1. Keep your engine clean on both the inside and outside. By keeping pariticles of dirt out of the workings of your engine, the operating surfaces will remain smooth and therefore less wear and better performance will result. Always use a fuel filter between your tank and the engine to catch any particles in the fuel. When operating in dusty conditions, use an air filter on your carb to keep particles out of your air intake. When done for the day, use a motor spray to clean off the dirt from the outside of the engine, especially the carb and linkages.

2. Use an after run at the end of the day. Since fuel contains elements that are hydroscopic (they abosrb water), any fuel left in an engine will attract moisture and therefore contribute to rust. It is important that you run the engine dry after your last flight or run to remove the last of the raw fuel. This can be done by simply pulling the fuel line from the engine and letting the engine run out. Apply several drops of after run oil into your carb and turn the engine over to ensure the oil gets distributed throughout the inner workings, coating the metal and protecting it from rust.

3. Ensure all of your nuts and bolts are tight. Between flying or running sessions, check that all of your bolts, such as the head bolts, backplate bolts, muffler bolts, engine mounting bolts, and carb mounting screws, are tight. Also, check that prop nut to ensure you won’t be launching a spinning prop on your next flight. An over revved engine, particularly a four stroke, can cause damage without the load of a prop or flywheel.

End of Season Maintenance

When the flying season is over, a small amount of engine care can ensure a successful beginning to the following season.

Clean Engine with Motor SprayRemove your engine from the model and give it a visual checkessentially perform the same checks you would do at the end of a day. Make sure that all bolts are in place and tight. It is not necessary to disassemble the engine unless you feel that there is internal damage or that the bearings require replacing. Replace any stripped bolts or rough running bearings. Clean the entire engine with motor spray to remove all dirt. Finally, load up the engine with after run oil, turning it over to ensure that all moving internal parts are covered. This will go a long way to reducing the chance of your engine rusting in the off season. Store the engine in a baggie to keep the dirt out and the oil in!
Beginning of the Season

The first thing to do before re-installing your engine is to replace the plumbing in your model. Remove the fuel tank and take out the rubber stopper and all brass and silicone tubing. There are components in the fuel that break down brass over time and if left, the tubing will eventually crumble or at the least allow air to enter the line. Clean the residue from the tank itself with a bit of isopropyl alcohol and then install a new rubber stopper assembly with new brass and silicone tubing. Reinstall your tank.

Take your engine from its baggie and use spray motor cleaner to get the after run off the outside of the casing. Re-install your engine to the model. When you are ready to run your engine, remove the glow plug and flush fresh fuel through the engine, turning it over with your thumb over the carb. This will clear out the storage oil. Replace the plug and start your engine as normal. http://  http://Amazon.com – Read eBooks using the FREE Kindle Reading App on Most Devices

Off-Road RC Car Tuning Guide

Need More Steering?
• Batteries – Move batteries towards the front of the vehicle.
• Front Shock Mounting – Move the lower shock mount towards the outside
• Front Camber Link – Longer camber links increase steering
• Front Ride Height – Lower the front ride height
• Rear Ride Height – Raise rear ride height for more high speed steering
• Rear Shock Mounting – Move upper mount towards outside
• Wheelbase – Lengthen the wheelbase for more steering
• Rear Toe-in – Decrease rear toe-in
• Ackerman – Use less Ackerman for more sensitive steering                                                                               offroad1                                                                                                             Need More Traction?
• Batteries – Move batteries towards the rear of the vehicle
• Rear Ride Height – Lower rear ride height
• Rear Camber – Less camber (0 -1 deg.)
• Camber Link – Longer camber links
• Rear Shock Mounting – Move upper mount towards the inside
• Wheelbase – Shorten the wheelbase
• Rear Toe-in – Increase rear toe-in
• Slipper – Loosen slipper so wheels don’t spin as much                                                                                             offroad2                                                                                                                 Need Better Jumping?
• Shock Oil – If bouncing too much or bottoms out over jumps, use heavier oil
• Shock Pistons – If bottoming out over jumps, use smaller hole pistons
• Rear Shock Mounting – If bottoming out over jumps move upper mount towards he outside
• Battery Position – If nose high during jumps, move battery forward, move rearward if nose is down during jumps
• Weight – Add weight to nose if it’s too high during jumps                                                                                     offroad3                                                                                                                              Need More High Speed Steering?
• Front Toe – More toe-in gives you more steering coming out of the corners
• Front Caster – Less caster gives you more steering exiting corners
• Rear Ride Height – Raise rear ride height for more high speed steering                                                            offroad4                                                                                                                    More Stable Over Rough Tracks?
• Anti-squat – Less anti-squat allows better acceleration on rough tracks
• Rear Camber – More negative camber is more stable on bumpy tracks
• Rear Camber Link – Shorter camber links is more stable on bumpy tracks
• Front Shock Mounting – Move lower shock mount inside for bumpy tracks
• Battery Mounting – Place in the middle for most stable on all tracks                                                                 offroad5                                                                                                                   Credits: rcracingusa.net  http://     

RC Boating Basics

       While RC airplanes and cars tend to get the majority of modelers’ attention, there is another area of RC that can be just as much, if not even more fun than both. RC boats provide a totally different experience than flying a plane or driving a car on many different levels. There are boats for everyone from performance enthusiasts, casual sailing fans, those who love the detailed runabouts of years gone by and more. Besides the aesthetics of individual boats, there are other considerations to think about such as battery or fuel power, to build or buy a Ready-To-Run boat and more.

Hull Styles:
When talking about the performance and handling of a particular boat, the configuration of the hull will have enormous impact on the overall performance and handling of a boat on the water. When talking about the different types of hulls there are several different configurations commonly used in RC boats that we’re going to discuss. They are, in no particular order Deep-Vs, catamarans, sailboats and Minis.boat14        Deep-Vs are one of the most popular hull style for boats and are capable of tremendously high speeds. A Deep-V gets its name after the look and profile of the hull’s distinctive V-shape. This hull configuration relies on hull strakes for improved stability and cornering ability, and its Deep-V design helps the boat absorb the impact of bigger waves on rough water. In addition, the V-shape causes the boat to bank in the turns to assist turning. When you jump on the throttle with a Deep-V, the nose will typically come out of the water and as the boat gets on plane, it will ride on the rear 1/3 of the hull. boat15       Catamarans have been modeled after off-shore race boats and, due to their wider hull footprint acting as 2 sponsons, provide additional positive stability when compared to a Deep-V. The additional hull surface in the water provides the handling improvements and increased stability. While it is more stable, the fact that a catamaran has more of its hull in the water translates into increased drag and slightly reduced top speed.  boat16       For the best in relaxation, sailboats offer the lowest maintenance and are very fulfilling in regards to boat-handling skills. With no power other than the wind, skills must be honed to learn how to adjust the sails to take best advantage of wind currents. There is nothing like tacking into the wind, seemingly defying the wind direction.                                                            boat17       When you want to drive a boat but you don’t have access to a huge piece of open water, a mini boat is the perfect option. Minis are smaller than other boats, but they feature similar handling and performance characteristics of their larger cousins. Minis are available as RTRs that require very little preparation time to get on the water and provide an inexpensive and economical way for someone to get their feet wet in the world of RC boating. Some mini boats can even be driven in swimming pools if you need to get your boating fix in a snap.                                                          boat18       While fuel-powered boats used to rule the roost recent advancements in motor and battery technology has swung the pendulum in favor of electric boats. Electric boats also provide simple, plug-and-play operation. When you want to drive your boat, all you need to do is charge up the battery pack, plug it in, and you’re ready to go. There are two different electric power types that a boat can use, brushed or brushless. Brushed motor systems provide a good place for people to get their feet wet in RC boating, so-to-speak, without breaking the bank. Brushed motor systems are a little slower and less expensive but still provide decent power and runtimes. Brushless motor systems provide more power, requires less maintenance than brushed motors and can handle a higher voltage level. With brushless motor systems you’ll see an increase in acceleration and top speed while also being more efficient than their brushed counterparts. With some brushless motor systems they can handle over 22-volts! Now that’s some serious power!                                                            boat19       Gasoline-powered boats use basically the same gasoline that your full-size car uses, making refueling relatively inexpensive and easy. There is one difference between what your car runs on and what an RC boat utilizes for fuel. RC boats run off of a gasoline and oil mixture, very similar to what you might use in a gas leaf blower or string trimmer. Boats that run off of gasoline engines are larger and use a larger displacement engine than their nitro-powered cousins. Regardless of whether you decide to go with a nitro- or gasoline-powered boat, you will find that, generally speaking, fuel-powered boats offer extended run times when compared to battery-powered boats. Fuel-powered boats also offer the intangible sensation of the realistic sound produced by the engine as it rips across the water’s surface, adding to the experience and excitement. The engine noise could possibly eliminate some ponds and streams from consideration as areas to drive in.                              boat20       Much like the advancements to the power systems we’ve seen some solid improvements in the realm of RC transmitters and receivers. 27Mhz and 75Mhz radio systems have, for the most part, been replaced with 2.4GHz systems. With 2.4GHz systems you will be less prone to interference from other sources and you don’t need to worry about frequency conflicts like in years past. Spektrum’s 2.4GHz Marine Technology also adds in the extra safety of an integrated cut-off to prevent runaways.                                                                                                                                              boat21       As with all mechanical devices, inevitably some maintenance or repairs must occur. There are several key tools that you should have on hand at all times in case you need to perform basic maintenance, repairs and tuning. Whether it’s a kit, ARR, or RTR, there should be a small plastic baggie that includes a basic assortment of tools and Allen wrenches. These tools tend to work for a while, but the metal they’re made out of is relatively soft. After several uses, the heads of the wrenches can round off, making getting a good bite on a screw head a real pain. Invest in a good hobby-grade set of Allen wrenches and nut drivers. You’ll realize their value the first time you use them. Dynamite carries a wide variety of hand tools to make these jobs go as smoothly as possible. These sets come in the most popular sizes used in RC and are as durable as they are affordable. From Allen wrenches and nut drivers to glow drivers and accessories, Dynamite has the right tools for the job. Other key tools for your box should include things such as a tuning screwdriver for making needle adjustments on your engine, needle-nose pliers, fuel bottle, glow igniter (also known as a glow driver) and extra glow plugs.                                                                                                                                                                               boat22       Both electric and nitro boats can make use of a battery charger. Obviously electrics will need to have their main batteries charged, but rechargeable batteries are used in nitro boats too. From the batteries for hand-held starters to receiver packs, having a good charger can make it easier to run your boat. Timer chargers will save you money, but don’t provide quite as complete of a charge. Peak detection chargers cost a little more but feature circuitry to ensure your battery pack is brought to a complete charge safely.
If you are planning on purchasing an electric-powered boat, some RTRs may require you to purchase a battery pack and a battery charger. You may even need to purchase these items for a nitro boat as well, especially if your nitro boat includes some sort of electric or hand starter. There are several things to consider when purchasing a battery pack. One of the biggest things to consider is the type of battery you will use, be it LiPo or NiMH. NiMH batteries are less expensive and provide solid performance. NiMH packs do tend to have a sharper discharge curve, meaning the speed and performance difference between the start and end of a run tends to be greater. You also have performance declines from one run to another in a day commonly. Another option would be to go with LiPo battery packs. LiPo batteries are lighter weight than NiMH packs and have a flatter discharge curve, meaning the performance from start to finish is more consistent. LiPo batteries also don’t have performance degradation issues like NiMH packs have.
Another consideration with LiPo battery packs is what is called the “C” rating. The C-rating of a battery refers to the amperage discharge capability of a particular battery. The higher the C-rating of a pack the more load it can handle without issue. You can always go with a higher C-rated battery for a boat but you never want to go with a lower C-Rating. For most boats a 30C rating or higher is sufficient.
Finally you’ll want to consider the capacity of your battery. Capacity refers to the amount of run time per charge each type of pack is capable of. A higher milliamp rating, or mAh, will translate into a long time between charges. For example a 3300mAh battery would run out of power before a 4200mAh battery pack. You can adjust the capacity up or down without issue, the only difference would be how long the battery runs before it needs to be recharged.                                                                                            Credits: proboatmodels.com and 

6/7/2012 by

Copyright:© 2012 Horizon Hobby, Inc http:// Shop Amazon Gift Cards. Any Occasion. No Expiration.

Water Drop Effect — Proline How to Paint series

paint1paint2paint3paint4paint5

 

Squirrel’s YouTube Video Playlists: http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=S…  http://  Join Amazon Kindle Unlimited 30-Day Free Trial

Why the US Government Is Terrified of Hobbyist Drones

A staff member from DJI Technology demonstrates the DJI Phantom 2 VIsion+ drone. Click to Open Overlay GalleryA staff member from DJI Technology demonstrates the DJI Phantom 2 VIsion+ drone. Kin Cheung/AP

IF YOU WANT to understand why the government freaked out when a $400 remote-controlled quadcopter landed on the White House grounds last week, you need to look four miles away, to a small briefing room in Arlington, Virginia. There, just 10 days earlier, officials from the US military, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FAA gathered for a DHS “summit” on a danger that had been consuming them privately for years: the potential use of hobbyist drones as weapons of terror or assassination.

The conference was open to civilians, but explicitly closed to the press. One attendee described it as an eye-opener. The officials played videos of low-cost drones firing semi-automatic weapons, revealed that Syrian rebels are importing consumer-grade drones to launch attacks, and flashed photos from an exercise that pitted $5,000 worth of drones against a convoy of armored vehicles. (The drones won.) But the most striking visual aid was on an exhibit table outside the auditorium, where a buffet of low-cost drones had been converted into simulated flying bombs. One quadcopter, strapped to 3 pounds of inert explosive, was a DJI Phantom 2, a newer version of the very drone that would land at the White House the next week.

Attendee Daniel Herbert snapped a photo and posted it to his website along with detailed notes from the conference. The day after the White House incident, he says, DHS phoned him and politely asked him to remove the entire post. He complied. “I’m not going to be the one to challenge Homeland Security and cause more contention,” says Herbert, who runs a small drone shop in Delaware called Skygear Solutions.  A Phantom 2 consumer drone is equipped with three pounds of mock explosive at a January 16 DHS conference.Click to Open Overlay GalleryA DJI Phantom 2 drone is equipped with three pounds of mock explosive at a January 16 DHS conference. Daniel Herbert

The White House drone, of course, wasn’t packing an explosive and wasn’t piloted by a terrorist—just a Washingtonian who lost control of the device while playing around in the wee hours. But the gentle censorship directed at Herbert illustrates how serious the issue is to counterterrorism officials.

A Drone Maker Takes Decisive Action

The Phantom line of consumer drones made by China-based DJI figures prominently in the government’s attack scenarios. That’s not because there’s anything sinister about DJI or the Phantom—in fact, just the opposite. The Phantom is the iPod of drones, cheap, easy to use, and as popular with casual and first-time fliers as with experienced radio control enthusiasts.

With all the attention surrounding the White House landing, DJI felt it had to take action. So last Thursday it pushed a“mandatory firmware update” for its Phantom 2 that would prevent the drone from flying in a 15.5 mile radius of the White House. So far it’s the only drone-maker installing what’s known as GPS geofencing.  http://

The technique is not new to DJI. The company first added no-fly zones to its firmware in April of last year to deter newbie pilots from zipping into the restricted airspace over airports, where they might interfere with departing and arriving aircraft. If a Phantom 2 pilot flies within five miles of a major airport’s no fly zone, the drone’s maximum altitude begins to taper. At 1.5 miles away, it lands and refuses to take off again. Municipal airports are protected by smaller zones, also programmed into the drones’ firmware.

For DJI, airport no-fly zones were a response to the growing popularity of the Phantom 2 and perhaps a hedge against the constant threat of increased regulation. “We started seeing the community of pilots grow,” says spokesman Michael Perry, and many users have no idea where they can and can’t legally fly the drone. “The guy in the White House incident, I’m pretty sure he didn’t know that flying in downtown DC is illegal.” Rather than put the onus on every user to learn local air traffic zoning rules, DJI translated them into code, and added a little buffer zone of its own for added safety.

The White House geofence is only the second one that isn’t centered on an airport, according to Perry—the first was Tiananmen Square. It won’t be the last. Now that the company has perfected the ability to erect geofences at will, the sky’s the limit—or, more accurately, the skies are limited. DJI is preparing an update that will increase the number of airport no fly zones from 710 to 10,000, and prevent users from flying across some national borders—a reaction to the recent discovery that drug smugglers are trying to use drones to fly small loads of meth from Mexico into the US.

‘I Want to Fly Wherever the Heck I Want’

This geofencing has critics, including hobbyists chagrined to find their favorite flying spot suddenly encompassed by a DJI no-fly zones. “I live just inside a red zone and find it quite offensive that a company would attempt to restrict any potential usage in/around my own house,” one user wrote in response to the first geofencing update last April.

“One could theorize that every zone anywhere could be a restricted zone,” wrote another. “Thank you but no thank you. If I spend thousands of dollars then I want to fly wherever the heck I want as long as it is under 400ft and 500ft away from airports.”

“This is NOT something users want,” another critic added. “I have a good relationship with my local airports and have worked with every local tower or control center. I get clearance to fly and they have been great, but this ‘update’ takes away my control.”

Ryan Calo, a University of Washingtonlaw professor who studies robots and the law, traces the resistance to two sources. “One is a complaint about restricting innovation. The second one says you should own your own stuff, and it’s a liberty issue: corporate verses individual control and autonomy,” Calo says. “When I purchase something I own it, and when someone else controls what I own, it will be serving someone else’s interest, not mine.”

DJI, in other words, has flown into one a core discontent of the Internet age. Technology’s no-fly zones already are everywhere. Lexmark printers and Keurig coffee makers have been programmed to reject third-party ink cartridges and coffee pods. Auto dealers are beginning to install remote-control immobilizers in cars sold to sub-prime borrowers, so they can shut down a driver who’s delinquent with an auto payment (the technology already has resulted in a 100-vehicle automotive hack attack.) In 2009, some Kindle owners discovered Amazon has the power to remotely delete the book they’re reading, after the company purged George Orwell’s 1984 and Animal Farm from e-book readers, an action Jeff Bezos later apologized for .

“The fate of small drone flights over DC may seem like a little thing—a spat worked out among private players,” wrote EFF’s Parker Higgins in a blog post Monday. “But these small battles shape the notion of what it means to own something and illustrate the growing control of manufacturers over user conduct.”

Geofencing Won’t Prevent Terrorism

While alarming to some, DJI’s paternal interference in its customers’ flight plans probably will reduce unintentional incidents like last week’s White House landing. But it certainly won’t prevent the scenario feared by official Washington: an attacker looking to weaponize a drone. For one thing, hardcore drone hobbyists tend to be tinkerers, and sooner or later their rumbling will translate into published firmware hacks and workarounds anyone can use.

“Right now there doesn’t exist any hacks to remove the geofencing or downgrade the firmware,” says Herbert. “I’m sure they’re coming. People will figure it out eventually.”

But, he notes, drone fliers who don’t want geofencing have many options. DJI’s mandatory update only affects the Phantom 2 line—ironically, the older Phantom 1 that landed at the White House isn’t included. And Phantom 2 owners will receive the mandatory update only when they link their drone to their Internet-connected PC or Mac. And if you really want to exercise your own judgment when flying, DJI says you can simply buy from a competitor.

“We do provide different layers of security to make it difficult to hack and get around,” says DJI’s Perry. But for those determined to avoid geofencing, “there’s an easy way to do that, which is to buy another quad-copter.”

That may be true for now, but it’s easy to see lawmakers and regulators jumping on DJI’s mandatory update as an easy cure, and mandating geofencing industrywide. When that happens, you can expect that circumventing drone firmware, for any reason, will become illegal, the same way hacking your car’s programming is illegal. One thing is for certain: Nobody willing to strap a bomb to a toy drone will be deterred.   http://Remote Control Toys on Sale

Modifying Your RC Motor

Nine Easy Go-FastMods- It’s no question – the sensation of speed is one of the most popular aspects of radio control. Racers and bashers may differ in many ways when it comes to how they enjoy their favorite hobby, but they both share their desire for faster acceleration and higher velocity. From cleaning and oiling bearings to installing more horsepower, there are many ways to make your car faster – some without spending any money!

mod1 http:/  I dug deep into the RCCA archives for this gem – nine easy go fast mods. Enjoy the read, then start wrenching – after all, you’ve got races to win…even if they’re just down the street.

MAXIMUM VELOCITY MINIMUM EFFORT
Words: Kevin Hetmanski

Who doesn’t like to go fast? Nobody. Who wants to go faster? Everybody! Without spending a lot of time or dough, following these 8 tips will help you add a few more miles per hour and a little more distance between you and the second-fastest guy on the block. Think of them as “speed reading.”

POP THE CARB RESTRICTER

If you remove the carb restricter, you can uncork an extra mph or 2 as well as some snappier acceleration.

SPEED INCREASE ª 2MPH

Most nitro cars come with unrestricted carbs, but if your carb has a restricter (such as on this Associated GT2 RTR), you can gain a few mph by popping it out. When we tested the GT2 RTR, removing the restricter added 2.7mph and made the throttle punchier, which is great on pavement and other high-grip surfaces but can cause spin outs in low-grip dirt. So, if you pop the restricter, keep it in your toolbox; you may want to put it back in!

USE A 7-CELL OR LIPO PACK

Upgrading to LiPo power will save more than 3 ounces of weight and increase voltage for a significant speed boost.

SPEED INCREASE ª5 TO 10MPH

Boosting voltage is an easy, no-mod way to increase the speed of any electric car, provided your speed control can handle the extra juice. If you switch from a 6-cell pack to a 7-cell, you’ll increase voltage from 7.2 to 8.4 volts and have a significant increase in off-the-line punch and top speed. You can get a similar benefit (along with reduced weight and increased run time) by switching to LiPo power. A 2-cell LiPo pack delivers 7.4 volts; that doesn’t seem like a big voltage gain, but it does make a very noticeable difference in performance because the pack is also 3.5 ounces (give or take) lighter than a sub-C pack.

RUN FUEL WITH A HIGHER NITRO PERCENTAGE

More nitro means more speed-producing power.

SPEED INCREASE ª2 TO 5MPH

More nitro means a bigger boom with each combustion cycle, and that means more speed (or at least you’ll have the power you need to spin a taller gear ratio, and that will mean more speed). For maximum engine life, we suggest that you run 20-percent nitro for regular running, but when it’s time to crush the other guys in the neighborhood, reach for a jug of 30 percent. But be warned, the engine will run hotter.

INSTALL A HOTTER MOTOR

Drop in a hotter motor, like a 10.5 from Tekin’s Gen2 series, and you can easily add 10mph or more, depending on the motor you’re replacing.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 15MPH

Swapping a Neon’s 4-banger for a big-cube V-8 would be a herculean task in the full-size hot-rodding world, but similar performance gains are as simple as removing two screws on an electric RC car. Most RTRs include an anemic 540 motor that’s good for about 18mph; install a modified motor, and you can easily double that speed; the lower the number of winds, the faster the motor. One caveat: the faster the motor, the greater the strain it will put on your car’s speed control, hence the “motor limit” rating for most speed controls. Check your speed control’s manual, and stick with a motor that has the same number or more winds than the limit.

INSTALL BALL BEARINGS

For the ultimate in friction-fighting, ceramic bearings like these from Acer are the way to go.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 2MPH

Fresh bushings can actually outperform grease-packed ball bearings, but bushings quickly degrade and that costs speed. For maximum velocity, metal-shielded (not rubber-sealed) bearings are best. Most cars already have ball-bearing transmissions, so all you have to do is pop bearings into the hubs. The speed increase won’t be dramatic and will depend on the state of your car’s drivetrain before the install, but you’ll get more than speed: bearings greatly outlast bushings and take the slop out of rotating parts.

SWAP MONSTER TREADS FOR STREET TIRES

Pro-Line’s Road Rage tires (left) will let your truck reach its maximum speed potential on pavement; bar-treads such as those on the Mashers (right) require more power to spin.

SPEED INCREASE ª2 TO 5MPH

Gnarly monster treads are fine for the dirt and grass, but their excessive weight and rolling resistance robs you of speed on pavement. If you trade those treads in for street rubber, your truck will need less power to overcome that weight and rolling resistance, leaving more power for pure speed once you’re geared to take advantage of that power and to compensate for what will likely be smaller-diameter tires.

TUNE THE ENGINE

Don’t be afraid to lean it out! You can always richen it back up if you go too far.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 10MPH

The only thing more amazing than the amount of power a little nitro RC engine can make is how much less power it makes if the needle settings are just a little off. We’ve seen guys give up half their engine performance to bad tuning, typically by running the engine too rich. Lean the high end out by turning it clockwise 1/12 turn (think of it as 5 minutes on the face of a clock), and make a few passes to see if your engine reaches higher rpm (and thus, higher speed). When the engine stutters at full throttle or starts running closer to 300 degrees, it’s too lean; aback it off until the engine sings a clear high note at full throttle with a faint smoke trail from the pipe.

CUT THE FAT

Kevin Hetmanski’s race-prepped Revo is full of weight-saving tricks: graphite chassis, deleted receiver and battery boxes, single high-torque steering servo to replace dual servos.

SPEED INCREASE ª1 TO 3MPH

If you can trim weight from your ride, it won’t need as much power to get up to speed, and that means it can go even faster. Exactly how much weight you can lop off depends on the type of vehicle you have. A burly monster truck with 8 shocks, heavy tires, a reverse-gear servo and other not-essential-for-speed parts can be lightened significantly by removing the superfluous parts, but a racing-style buggy, stadium truck, or touring car might only have a few grams to offer (don’t bother).

FAST FACT

When looking for weight savings, go to the wheels and tires first. The old racers’ adage “a pound of rotating weight is like 2 pounds of non-rotating weight” is very true, especially if you have a monster truck with heavy chevron tires!

GEARING THE REAL SECRET OF SPEED

A set of pinion gears such as these from Robinson Racing will let you match your car’s gearing to its power potential.

All of the tips outlined in this article can increase speed, but to really take advantage of them, proper gearing is essential. Otherwise, you’ll probably see quicker acceleration but little or no increase in top speed, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as acceleration wins more races than sheer speed. But when absolute speed is the goal, it’s all about gearing. To understand why, think of your car as a bicycle, and its engine as your legs.

THINK PEDAL POWER

Put your bike in first (the easiest) gear, and you can easily pedal to your maximum rpm. You probably aren’t going very fast, but you can really spin the pedals. A lighter bike, more aerodynamic position, or reduced rolling resistance won’t help you go any faster, since your legs are already going as fast as they can. So you up shift the bike to a taller gear ratio, and you go faster, and you keep up shifting and going faster until the gear ratio is too tall for the strength of your legs to overcome. The same thing is going on in your RC car. Unless your modification increases the motor’s or engine’s rpm, your car won’t go faster. But if you make it more powerful (or free up more power by diverting less to fighting inertia and rolling resistance), your powerplant will be able to turn a taller gear ratio for more speed just like an Olympic cyclist is able to go faster because he has stronger legs to turn a bigger gear on his bicycle.

PUTTING IT TO WORK IN RC

There are two ways to gear up an RC car for more speed: install a pinion or clutch bell with more teeth or a spur gear with fewer teeth. This will make your car roll farther with each turn of the engine’s crank or the motor’s output shaft and thus increase speed. Try going up two teeth maximum on the clutch bell, or up to four teeth on the pinion gear. Don’t overdo it; if you gear the car too high, you’ll strain the powerplant, and you may actually go slower. Check your manual for suggested gear ratio ranges.                 Credits:    http:// http:// Remote Control Toys on Sale