Tagged: quadcopters

Star Wars Air Hogs Star Destroyer Drone

The Imperial I-class Star Destroyer,[20] also known as the Imperial I-class Destroyer[21] or the Imperator-class Star Destroyer,[5] was an iconic class of warships designed by Lira Wessex and built by Kuat Drive Yards.[22][23] The Imperial-class Star Destroyers, along with Imperial stormtroopers, represented the might of the Imperial Military throughout the galaxy during the reign of the Galactic Empire.[23]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Imperial I-class Star Destroyer

Production information

Manufacturer

Kuat Drive Yards[1][2]

  • Various subcontractors[3]

Model

Imperator-class Star Destroyer,[4] later renamed Imperial I-class Star Destroyer[5]

Class

Star Destroyer[2]

Cost

150,000,000 credits[6]

Technical specifications

Length

Maximum acceleration

>2,300 g

MGLT

60 MGLT[7]

Maximum atmospheric speed

975 km/h[8]

Hyperdrive rating

Hyperdrive system

Equipped[7]

Power output

Peak: ~7,73 × 1024 W[2][10]

Shielding

KDY ISD-72x shield generator domes (2)[7](local area-effect)[11]

Sensor systems

KDY ISD-72x shield generator domes (2)[12][11]

Targeting systems

LeGrange targeting computers[13]

Armament

Crew

Cargo capacity

36,000 metric tons[7]

Consumables

Communication systems

HoloNet transceiver

Usage

Year introduced

Affiliation

  • Galactic Republic[4]
  • Galactic Empire[18]
  • New Republic[19]
  • Imperial Remnant
  • Galactic Federation of Free Alliances
  • ConfederationThe Imperator-class was originally used by the Republic Navy toward the end of the Clone Wars, and served alongside the Tector-class in a few task forces during the conflict.[4] It was at the time one of the largest warship classes in the Republic Navy.[24] It later became a mainstay of the Imperial Navy[25][5] and was also fielded to a lesser degree by the Empire’s successor-states.[19]         

    Characteristics

    Half the budget is going to the production of these enormous new Star Destroyers.
    Mon Mothma[src]

    Cost

    The Imperial I-class belonged to the Star Destroyer family of warship, exemplified by its dagger/arrowhead design. A single Imperial-class vessel cost the Empire more than twenty times the cost of a EF76 Nebulon-B escort frigate, which was the equivalent of several star systemsannual economic output.[26][27]

    Dimensions

    The Imperial-class was produced in large numbers and was the premier warship class of the Galactic Empire.[22] All known variants were 1,600 meters long (one mile). Compared to most common frigates and downscaled cruisers[5] known from the days of the Old Republic, the Imperial-class was a huge warship,[28][23] but in the Imperial Navy, it was one of the Empire’s mid-sized mainline warships,[16] like its predecessor had been for the Republic.[5] The hulls of the Imperial-class were painted in Star Destroyer White, a purely economic choice as it was the only variety of paint that was produced in sufficient quantities to coat the Empire’s immense number of warships.

    Crew requirements

    According to officially available statistics, Imperial-class Star Destroyers had at least 37,000 officers and crew. Counting the stormtrooper complement (one division or legion, 9,700 men) would total 46,700. This would include a stormtrooper detachment, starfighter pilots, and support craft pilots.[20] Differing from many other Imperial vessels, recreational facilities provided entertainment for off-duty personnel and “guest rooms’ could accommodate Imperial VIPs.[29]

    Offensive and defensive systems                                                                                                                                                                                           Cross-section showing from left to right: Main gun batteries, an auxiliary reactor, main hypermatter reactor core, docking and hangar bays, storage areas, tractor beamprojectors.                                                          

    The Imperial I-class Star Destroyer possessed a main battery of six heavy turbolasersand two heavy ion cannons, arranged in four dual mounts flanking the ship’s tower structure.[28]

    Like with several other Star Destroyer classes, the designers did not take advantage of their wedge shape to give the heavy cannons the ability to focus on targets in the forward firing arc that were level with the ship.[5][28] This could have been accomplished either by superelevating the aft turrets, or merely by spacing the turrets apart over a longer distance of the ship’s length. In any case, this Star Destroyer class could bring all its heavy guns to bear by dipping its bow downward.[30]

    Numerous smaller and medium guns were mounted around the ship to ward off attacks against lesser ships not capable of being targeted by the main battery. They varied in size; some were designed as point-defense cannon to destroy incoming missiles and starfighters while others engaged lesser capital ships.[28] Some ships, such as Emancipator, were refitted with proton torpedo launchers. Three triple-gun turrets were mounted on the ridge of the ship, just forward of the lowest, forwardmost terrace of the dorsal superstructure.[28]

    Mounted just beyond the forward tip of the attack hangar (see fighter complement), were two large ventral turbolasers, which sat near the corners of the massive hangar.[18]                                                              

    Complement

    Imperial-class Star Destroyers typically carried a standard Imperial wing of 6 TIE squadrons, for a total of 72 starfighters.[22][28]

    The standard wing included four TIE Fighter squadrons (one squadron often referred to be a reconnaissance squadron of TIE/rc starfighters), one squadron of TIE Interceptors, one squadron of TIE Bombers (lower priority ships had to make do with TIE/gt starfighter-bombers). Often one or two flights in a fighter squadron were TIE/fc starfighters. Sometimes one of the fighter squadrons was used for training purposes. By the Battle of Endor, one of these fighter squadrons had been phased out in favor of a second squadron of TIE Interceptors.[31]                                                                  Imperial I-class Star Destroyer in a planet’s atmosphere.                                                                                                                                                     

    The attack hangar was located on the underside on the ship and was guarded by a set of armored doors. TIE fighter service and refueling bays, and TIE launch hangars surrounded the main hangar. TIEs were launched from cycling racks and pilots boarded from overhead gantries and were released into space as they disengaged from the front position in the racks.[28]

    Returning fighters landed in separate hangars and then were guided by small tractor beams into receiver-carriers. The receivers carried the TIE to a debarkation station where the pilot would exit. Once moved through the transfer tunnels to a launch hangar, the fighter could be serviced and refueled in a separate bay. In the hangar, the TIEs were cycled through a launch rack and ready for the next launch. The small forward hangar was for shuttle craft carrying high-ranking officials. The forward hangar was also used as a back-up to the main hangar.[28]

    These ships carried 9,700 troops, as well as massive war vehicles such as AT-AT and AT-ST walkers.[22] AT-AT barges and other landing craft were used to deliver ground assault forces to a planet’s surface.[22][28][32][33]Although larger landing craft could only be carried onboard bigger Imperial vessels,[16] the Imperial-class could transfer a large number of heavy walkers to smaller transport ships via a detachable rail system.[34]

    The Star Destroyer could use its guns and TIE starfighters to support any surface action. If a planet required a lasting presence, a Star Destroyer could quickly deploy a prefabricated garrison base.[22] Like most other Star Destroyer models, the Imperial-class was capable of entering atmospheres and supporting ground operations directly.[35][36][37]                                                                                                              

    Propulsion systems

    ISD-I engines

    Ion engines on an Imperial I.

    There were entire planets that, throughout their history, did not expend as much power as an Imperial-class ship did in one hyperspacejump.[22] The hyperspace generator was located along the ship’s ventral surface.[29] A massive solar ionization reactor bulged from the ventral spine, annihilating hypermatter as fuel to power the ship. Auxiliary reactors flanked the main reactor and the three reactors were connected to the three main engines. In addition, the backup engines were connected to additional reactors as well.[28]

    Catastrophic release braces were located underneath the ventral reactor bulge, in case of emergencies where the core of the main reactor had to be ejected from the ship.[38]

    As designed, the Imperial-class had a Class 2 hyperdrive with a Class 8 emergency backup.[6] However, KDY’s practice of subcontracting out the design to meet Imperial demands led to occasional design quirks: Star Destroyers built by the Corellian Engineering Corporation were considerably faster, both at sublight and hyperspace speeds.[39]

    For sublight propulsion, the Imperial-class relied on an array of three primary Destroyer-I ion engines produced by KDY specifically for the vessels. For emergency situations requiring additional thrust, the Imperial-class could use its four Gemon-4 ion engines.[31] The engines were capable of accelerating the ship with a force of several thousand g.[33]

    Bridge tower

    The command bridge tower of the Imperial-class Star Destroyer was massive, and the command bridge followed a design similar to that of many other KDY warship classes, such as the Venator-class[40], the Executor-class designs.[11] The sensor array on top of the Mk. I’s tower had support beams running diagonally across it. These would later be substituted for vertical ones during a minor refit, which made the array look similar to the one on Mk. II vessels.[41] The two globes atop the bridge tower served two purposes: aiding both in hyperspace communication and deflector shield generation. The proximity of the deflector shield generators made the bridge tower one of the most protected parts of the Star Destroyer[31][42]                                                                                                              

    History

    I hate the look of these new mass-produced Imperator-class Destroyers. None of the artistry that went into the old Acclamators or Venators—even the Victory Twos. So goes elegance.
    Brudi Gayn[src]                                                                                                                                                                                    

       

    Imperial-I-SD-ANH

    An Imperial I-class Star Destroyer as seen from below.

    Republic origin

    The Imperator-class was designed as a massive, powerful, mid-sized warship,[5], and appeared in limited numbers during the Clone Wars, where it served in several Republic task forces.[4] As the war neared its end in 19 BBY, the production lines of new Imperator-class and Tector-class destroyers expanded, while the lines for the older, lighter Venator-class slowed down.[5]

    The first vessel was named the Executrix,[24] while the second was the Exactor, which later served as the first personal flagship of the Imperial enforcer Darth Vader.[43] There was also an Imperator among the Mk.I models, sharing the class name.[44] Following the Great Jedi Purge and the establishment of the Galactic Empire in 19 BBY, the Imperator model was renamed Imperial-class[5] and production of the class was increased even further[43] and refined.[25] Despite the name change, some Imperial documents continued to use the original name to identify the class.[17]

    Imperial service

    Exactor

    The Exactor orbiting New Plympto in 19 BBY.

    Imperial-class Star Destroyers had a distinguished career in the Imperial Starfleet, where they symbolized the Empire’s military might (for better or worse). Eventually, these Star Destroyers rendered older vessels, like the Venator-class, obsolete.[45]

    Capable of laying waste to entire worlds (provided those worlds did not have planetary shields), the Imperial-class became infamous as the prime enforcer of Imperial rule, and even served as a small, peacekeeping battleship.[22][28] According to official records, over 25,000 were eventually produced.[46] The Navy’s immense demand for Star Destroyers led Kuat Drive Yards to subcontract the design out to various other shipwrights, which occasionally led to a number of design quirks: Star Destroyers built by the Corellian Engineering Corporation were considered the fastest ships in the Imperial Navy, both at sublight and hyperspace speeds.[47] Many Star Destroyers were destroyed in the fratricidal warfare that consumed the Empire after the death of Emperor Palpatine at Endor in 4 ABY, while others defected or were captured over the years.[19]

    Within sector-level fleets, the ISD served a central battleship role, being the flagship of the unit known as the “Battle Squadron.” A Sector Group was responsible for patrolling a given sector and was composed of 24 Star Destroyers.[29] It was also observed to operate more or less independently and often far from support ships and facilities. Through many operations, the ISD functioned as a destroyer, a capital ship fast enough to chase down blockade runners and protect fleets. As an escort, it also supported Imperial Star Cruisers and Star Dreadnoughts in fleet combat.[48][16]

    When he assaulted Hoth, Darth Vader commanded the Star Dreadnought Executor and brought along a flotillaof Imperial-class vessels from Death Squadron to assault the planet. The Rebellion’s heavy ion cannon, powered by the reactor of a battlecruiser, easily overwhelmed individual Star Destroyer shields and rapidly disabled ships in orbit.[41][49]

    Executor and escorts

    A refitted Imperial I-class Star Destroyer escorting the Executor.

    In the New Republic era, Imperial-class Star Destroyers continued in the escort role for larger vessels in campaigns like Operation Shadow Hand in 10 ABY. The Super Star Destroyer Allegiance led a task force of Imperial-class ships and World Devastators during the First Battle of Mon Calamari.[50] This was one of many fleets that struck out from the Core as part of the operation, which was aimed at taking back most of the Galactic Empire’s former territories. Operation Shadow Hand saw a relatively heavy use of different types of Super Star Destroyers supported by Star Destroyers.[50]

    However, due to lack of logistics, not all Imperial splinter factions made use of Super Star Destroyers. For instance, Grand Admiral Thrawn massed a sizable force in 9 ABY, but could not obtain any larger warships. In those instances, Star Destroyers like the Imperial-class acted as main command ships of a navy.[51][52]

    Later service

    This particular class of vessel saw extensive service in other navies, including that of the successor-states the New Republic and the Galactic Alliance.[19] Some New Republic Imperial I-class Star Destroyers, like the Mon Mothma, were refitted to include gravity well projectors.[53]

    Private service

    Errant Venture

    The Errant Venture.

    One Star Destroyer was operated by a private individual—the Errant Venture, formerly the Virulence, which had been captained by the smuggler Booster Terrik. The warship was claimed by Booster in the wake of the decisive Battle of Thyferra that concluded the Bacta War,[54] but was in poor condition for many years owing to the great cost of maintaining such a large vessel. In addition, she was stripped of the vast majority of her armament: only ten turbolasers were permitted, and even those were not always functional.[55]

    Years later, the vessel received a comprehensive refit in exchange for Booster permitting its use in a New Republic special-operations raid on an Imperial base. The most notable part of this refit was a deep red paint job instead of the classic Imperial white.[56] While Captain Terrik was not permitted to keep all of his weapons after the operation, they were reinstated when the Yuuzhan Vong War occurred. During the Yuuzhan Vonginvasion, she served as a temporary Jedi sanctuary and also as squadron flagship.[57]

    Variants

    Imperial II-class Star Destroyer

    Several variant designs and refits were made using the Imperial-class as a basis. The most famous and widely produced, was the Imperial II-class Star Destroyer, the second iteration of the class. It included improved armor and weaponry, a different sensor tower and other cosmetic differences.[20]

    Imperial-class variant

    Victory basis

    Imperial-class variant design.

    Similar to how some Victory-class vessels borrowed design elements from the Imperial-class[58], at least one Imperial variant borrowed elements of the Victory-class. It had an elongated command tower and wing-structures on the side of the superstructure.[59]

    Interdictor-class Star Destroyer

    Another variant was the Interdictor-class Star Destroyer, heavily modified Imperial-class ships that were fitted with gravity-well generators and utilized to halt hyperspace travel for enemy ships.[60]

    Behind the scenes

    There has been some disagreement over the name of the class. Early material by Geoffrey Mandel, now considered unofficial, showed the Star Destroyer model smaller than they later appeared. The class-name Imperator was used for these drawings, and the ships were to be produced at the Gyndine shipyards. Many of the designs were greatly upscaled shortly before production began. Some critics suggest that naming one of the Empire’s class of ships Imperial is redundancy in name.

    Star Wars: Revenge of the Sith Incredible Cross-Sections eventually put the debate to rest, by clarifying the issue—while the class was originally named Imperator, it was renamed Imperial at some point after the Great Jedi Purge. Other sources would later on reference Imperator, including the novel Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader and the EU-section on the Venator-class Star Destroyer’s Databank title official profile in the Databank (content now obsolete; backup link on Archive.org). The word “Imperator” is Latin and was used as a title for “An army commander in the Roman Republic”. Later, during the Roman Empire, it became a title worn by the Emperors and signified “The supreme power of the Roman emperor”.[61]

    Imperial SD Sketchbook

    Star Destroyer concept sketch.

    Based on an animatic of a Revenge of the Sith TV spot, an Imperator-class Star Destroyer was scheduled to make an appearance during the final scenes of the film, but was apparently cut out and replaced with a Venator-class in post-production.

    Imperial-class Star Destroyers have featured prominently in many Star Wars computer games. However, they have generally been “toned-down” to allow the player some chance of defeating them with a starfighter. Some of these game mechanics have included shooting sensor globes and reactor bulbs with your starfighter to bring down the whole ship.

    Imperial-class Star Destroyers have sometimes been referred to as cruisers. The book Starships of the Galaxy(Saga Edition) referred to most common Star Destroyers as being classified as “star cruisers”, with lowercase letters. It also noted that unlike the term “Star Destroyer”, “star cruiser” means “a naval cruiser that travels through space”.[62] Since the Imperial-class has also been called a “star destroyer”, the class can be seen as either a naval destroyer or a cruiser, given similarities in their roles. Imperial-class ships have also been described as battleships (more specifically, “peacekeeping battleships”).[2] This is presumably because one Imperial constituted a line on its own. RotS:ICS also mention warships being “downscaled”, depicting at least two separate classification systems, one where regular Star Destroyers are destroyers and another where they are battleships.

    Numerous Expanded Universe sources state that the Imperial I is armed with 60 identical turbolasers and 60 identical ion cannons. However, analysis of the Star Destroyer models used in the films shows that this is a flawed description. The Star Wars: Incredible Cross-Sections factbook followed the movie model more closely, describing three twin-barreled heavy turbolasers and one ion cannon on each side of the command tower, one quad-laser cannon in each side trench, three cannons in front of the terrace superstructure, and numerous smaller guns lining each trench, as well as several tractor beam projectors located inside the vessel.

    The Star Wars Technical Journal offers a slightly different number for the crew requirement: 4,520 officers and 32,565 enlisted men making a total crew of 37,085.

    Credits :http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/                                                                                                                                 

                                                       

WLtoys V383 500 Electric 3D 2.4G 6CH RC Quadcopter

drone11 Description:
Brand name: WLtoys
Item No.: V383
Item name: 500 Electric 3D RC Quadcopter
Transmitter: 6 channel
Span: 404mm*415mm
Blades diameter: 289mm
Weight: about 990g
Battery: 14.8V 2200mAh 50C lipo battery
Motor: 2218 3000KV
ESC: 50A Brushless ESC
Servo: 0.8 sec/60°,3KG/cm 6V
Flight time: 6-8 minutes
Charging time: 60-80 minutes
Control distance: 200-500m                                                                                                                                            drone12 Features:
6 Axis stabilization with 3D flight mode
Higher performance 3D flight capable
Being able to fly stably like a quadcopter and flexibly like a helicopter
Stable and smooth flight for beginner
Can fly forward, backward, and sideways, with the ability to perform maneuvers including loops, rolls, tic-toc’s, hurricanes, funnels, and more.                                                                                                                       drone13 Package Included:
1 x  WLtoys V383 RC Quadcopter
1 x 2.4G Transmitter
1 x 14.8V 2200mAh battery
1 x balance charger
8 x propellers
1 x manual                                                                                                                                                                            http://      rc fun

XK DETECT X380 X380-A X380-B X380-C GPS 2.4G 1080P HD RC Quadcopter RTF

Model Number: X380

Presenting the XK Detect X380 2.4GHz RTF GPS RC Drone! This drone delivers rock-solid performance, crisp handling, and exceptional stability all in package that’s simple to set up and fly right out of the box! This RC Drone is designed for stress-free camera work and filming. From the 2.4GHz transmitter with one-key take-off and landing, dual self-centering sticks for automatic hovering, and an integrated GPS Auto-Pilot System, the XK Detect allows you to have your full attention on getting great video. Whether you’re a professional or an enthusiast, the XK Detect X380 2.4GHz RTF GPS RC Drone offers outstanding quality for the price. Get yours today!                                                                                         drone4                                                                                                drone3  drone5   drone6  drone7  drone8     

DJI Inspire 1 Pro Black Edition

The DJI Inspire 1 Pro Black Edition takes the bright, white shell and remote control of the Inspire 1 and transforms them into black. Inspired by high-end film making equipment the world over and also its cousins the DJI Ronin and Ronin-M, this new look adds style and gravitas to the already head turning Inspire 1 and allows it to fit in neatly on a film set.                                                                                                     drone1    AERIAL IMAGING EVOLVED

The DJI Inspire 1 Pro and Inspire 1 RAW are the smallest, easiest professional aerial filmmaking platforms in the world. They combine DJI’s unparalleled leadership in aerial technology with world-class M4/3 imaging capabilities. Whether you are a professional photographer or a Hollywood filmmaker, the Inspire 1 Pro and Inspire 1 RAW are ready to take your work to new heights.                                                     drone2   

ZENMUSE X5 AND X5R
The Zenmuse X5 and X5R are among the smallest Micro 4/3 cameras ever made and the only M4/3 cameras designed specifically for aerial imaging. Both can capture ultra-clear 4K video at up to 30 frames per second and capture photos at 16 megapixels in Adobe DNG RAW. The Zenmuse X5R is also the first camera of this type able to shoot 4K raw video, making it perfect for professional filmmaking. As M4/3 cameras, you have a choice of lenses and also full wireless control over focus, aperture and more.    camera1  

COMPREHENSIVE APP CONTROL
The DJI go app gives you an unprecedented level of control over your camera while you fly. Use the intuitive auto focus mode to compose the perfect shot and change everything from focus to shutter speed and aperture with the tap of a finger. Through the same app you also control how your Inspire flies, from auto take-off and landing, to fine tuning of your flying experience and even a set of intelligent flight modes.                                                                                                                                                                                   camera2                       Inspire 1 Pro – Professional aerial filmmaking platform | DJI

Complete Control

Use the Inspire 1 Pro or Inspire 1 RAW just like you would a camera, with a shutter button for stills and a record button for video built into the remote control. It also features a jog dial that allows you to change camera settings quickly, and customizable buttons for you to personalize. Plug the DJI Focus into the remote control to extend its reach as far as the Inspire 1 Pro or Inspire 1 RAW flies.                                         control1

Remote Focus

Take control of your focus for the first time, and combine it with aperture control for another layer of creative freedom. Do you want to start on a shallow depth-of-field of your subject and then bring the background into sight? With remote focus control you can, with a tap of the screen inside the DJI GO app. Using the DJI Focus, you can even turn a dial just like you would turn a lens allowing for even more refined control.                                                                                                                                                                    camera3camera4

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AEE Toruk AP11 Pography FPV Unmanned Aircraft System

drone18

AEE Toruk AP11 Pography FPV Unmanned Aircraft System UAV Aerial Drone Quadcopter Transport Android RC Airplane , red & white

Intuitive Flight System

Follow Me Function

Fly Long Distances over 2,000 feet

Autonomous Flight

Easy to Control Flying drone23                                       

3-Axis Gimbal w/ S61 Action Camera

Stabilized Videos with Vertical Tilt Movement

Record in1080p/60fps HD Video Resolution

Take Vivid 16MP Photos

10X Digital Zoom

Detachable Action Camera for Additional Usagedrone24

Follow Me Feature

Dedicated Wristband with GPS Receiver

Accurate Tracking

Dedicated Antennae for Increased Precisiondrone25                                drone26 The AP11 is one of AEE’s top drone models. This powerful weatherproof quadcopter boasts a flight time of up to 25 minutes with a maximum speed of up to 45 miles per hour. The drone’s 3-axis gimbal stabilizes the camera to produce beautifully smooth images and is compatible with all S Series AEE Cameras as well as the Hero, Hero 3, Hero 3+ and Hero 4 GoPro models.                                                          drone27 Connect your smartphone directly to the remote control and follow the drone’s flight path with the built in wifi capability. Included is a set of spare propellers and propeller protectors, along with tools and a detailed instruction manual. The real highlight of the AP11 is the integrated follow-me function. This function is activated with the included Follow-Me-wristband, which automatically has the drone follow the person wearing the band. This drone takes unique aerial photographs that are of professional film studio quality. Look at the world from a new perspective with the AP11 recording new heights.

Wireless Remote Control

Powerful radio remote control transmitter

Joy Sticks allowing for precise movement

Integrates with smartphone for first person live view (FPV)controller1controller2

 

Product Description

Brand:Others,
Model:AEE AP11,
Channel Number:8CH,
Gyro:2 axis,
Radio System:2.4G,
Color:Red,White,
Function:Access Real-Time Footage,Control the Camera,One Key To Auto-Return,Hover,GPS Positioning,Gather Flight Data,
IOS & Android System Control:Android,IOS,
Camera Resolution:1080 p / 60 f video function, 16 MP static photo,
Remote Control Distance:700 Meter,
Recharging Time:1-2 hour,
Flight time (Minutes):25minutes,

Product Details

  • Brand: FW Flying toys

Features

 

Quadcopter: 3 Things you Need to Know

drone12

Helicopters, Drones, Airplanes, Quadcopters? What does it all mean? This week we’re clearing the confusion on the very popular quadcopter. This has got to be one of the newest, trendiest, and most popular kinds of drone for sale. If you’re interested, we’ll bring you three things you must know about quadcopters.

First things first, what the heck is a quadcopter?

No need for confusion here, a quadcopter is simply an “unmanned helicopter having four motors.” Most hobby sites, like ours, also use the term to refer to any RC Drone with four motors. Want the breakdown on all other types of multicopters? Heres the list:

Helicopter: 1 motor                                                                                                                                                       copter35                                       Bicopter: 2 motors        copter36 Tricopter: 3 motors copter37  Quadcopter: 4 motors drone13 Pentacopter: 5 motors drone14 Hexacopters: 6 motors drone15 Octocopter: 8 motors drone16

The multicopter phenomenon currently ends with a Drone/Helicopter with 8 motors (which is plenty).

What you need to know if you purchase a quadcopter:

Well, first off, congratulations on your new quadcopter! We sincerely hope you enjoy it. Just like becoming a new driver, you’ll need to know a few things before you fly your drone.

1. Drone Registration: It is a mandatory thing to do for all drones weighing .55 pounds and less than 55 pounds must be registered to the FAA. Don’t worry, it won’t cost you much, but you must do it before flying your drone.

2. Locate your Power Switch: Sorry if we sound like Captain Obvious here, but you’d be surprised, sometimes it is hard to find this tiny switch. Once you do find it, turn your quadcopter on to see if it had any charge. Test your controller by pressing buttons to make sure that your quadcopter and remote are in sync. If there is no signal, refer to your owners manual to sync both of your devices.

3. Charge Time:  All quadcopters are different, but knowing your quadcopter’s charge time is very important. Find out the time LIMIT. Do not exceed your charging limit because you WILL burn out your battery and have to purchase a new one.

4. Flight time: The more money you spend on your quadcopter, the longer you’ll be in the air. When a quadcopter is about to die, it will simply fall from whatever height it is at. If you know your flight time, you can estimate at what time you should bring your quadcopter down to a shorter height as to not cause damage.

5. Range of Flight: How far does your quadcopter go? Know your range of flight so you can always be in control. For all quadcopters, there is a 400 foot height restriction to prevent interference with Aircraft.

6. Short list of general rules to know:

– Avoid flying in residential or highly populated areas. Not all people are comfortable with quadcopters, and if you lose control, you could crash into someone.

– Keep your drone within eyesight at all times.

– Check your local laws to see if there are any restrictions on where you can or cannot fly your quadcopter.

How to fly your quadcopter:

Now that you know the lingo and the rules, here’s how to get your quadcopter in the air.

Before you fly, check everything off this list:

  • -Remote battery is charged
  • -Quadcopter battery is charged
  • -Micro SD card is in place if there is a camera option
  • -Make sure all pieces of your quadcopter are secure
  • -Pick a flight location with a soft landing and no crowd
  • -Make sure there is no wind or rain to cause flight problems
  • -Be sure you can maintain a direct line of sight at all times with your quadcopter

Learn the lingo of your Transmitter:If you ever need to refer back to your manual for additional instructions, there will be certain terminology to understand in order to use your controller.                         drone17

Roll: Action of pushing the right stick to the left or right. This will “roll” your quadcopter diagonally to the left or right.

Pitch: Action of pushing the right stick forwards or backwards. This will tilt the quadcopter to move forward or backwards.

Yaw: Action of pushing the left stick to the left or right. This will help you change directions while in flight.

Throttle: Action of pushing the left stick forward. This will adjust the height or altitude of your quadcopter. This is the action you will need to use to get your quadcopter off the ground.

Trim: Buttons that will help you increase or decrease the sensitivity of the roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle.

Getting off the ground: All you need is throttle. Use your left stick to put your drone in the air. Make sure you move your left stick smoothly and slowly to achieve more height. Slowly release your left stick to gently place your quadcopter back on the ground.

Once you feel comfortable with flying up and down, try out the rest of your remote functions. One by one, add throttle and yaw, throttle and roll, and throttle and pitch. Moving between all of these functions will get you more comfortable with flying your quadcopter.                                                                                   Credits: http://www.hobbytron.com/blog/   http://   

Joining the Quad Squad: How To Get Started with RC Quadcopters

Want to shoot your own GoPro videos from high vantage points and other places you can’t normally reach? You may want to mount one on a quadcopter. Getting started isn’t difficult, but you’ll benefit from our recommendations and tips for beginners. Welcome to the world of multi-rotor RC aircraft.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             A cursory search on YouTube or Vimeo will yield a bountiful selection of footage captured from radio-controlled (RC) model aircraft known as multi-rotors. The name comes from the fact that these particular models rely solely on horizontal propellers (rotors) to provide lift and directional control. Most multi-rotors have four propellers, so they are called “quad-rotors”, or just “quads”. For the sake of simplicity in this article, I’ll brand all multi-rotors as “quads”, while recognizing that there are versions with three to eight airscrews…sometimes more.                                                                                                      drone3

Despite their unaerodynamic appearance, quads are ideal for capturing photographs and video footage from the sky. Many of them can heft a surprisingly heavy payload (i.e. good quality imaging equipment) and hold a steady posture in the air. With the ability to hover in place and fly in confined spaces, quads can often provide perspectives that no other filming technique can mimic. Watch some of those YouTubevideos and you’ll see what I mean. Not only that, but quads are fun to fly with or without a camera attached.

But before you zip out and buy a quad of your own, there is one more thing you should know. Switch over to a news site and it won’t take a lot of digging around to find the unglamorous B-side of quads. How about the wedding photographer who flew his camera-toting quad into the bride and groom? Then there is the wise guy who took his quad over Manhattan, only to crash into the side of a high rise, where his machine plummeted to the sidewalk 300 feet below. Let’s not forget the genius who flew his quad so high and so near JFK airport that it was spotted by a passing (and quite perturbed) airline captain! This unfortunate list goes on and on, yet the takeaway is but twofold:

  • Multi-rotor models are capable of inflicting surprising amounts of injury and/or damage…think “flying Cuisinart”.
  • Multi-rotor models require diligence and practiced skill to fly competently…think “unicycle”.             drone4If you’re still reading, I assume that you have some aspiration of owning a quad and perhaps racking up those YouTube views. That goal is reasonable and attainable even if you’ve never operated a RC vehicle before. Just recognize that diving into multi-rotors without heeding the lessons above could render you the next bungler featured on the evening news. Not to mention that doing something with your quad that captures the attention of CNN is also likely to attract the attention of local police, the FAA, and quite possibly the FBI…and that’s no joke. My point is not to discourage you from buying a quad, but to inform you of the aspects of quad ownership that are often unintuitive.Let’s get started!

    Anatomy of a Multi-Rotor                                                                                                                          drone5

    As with any RC vehicle, there are two basic components to deal with: the transmitter and the vehicle itself. The transmitter is the device you hold to provide control inputs. A quad transmitter is the standard two-joystick box that is also used for RC airplanes and helicopters. Moving the left joystick up or down changes the power setting on all four motors and makes the quad climb, descend, or maintain altitude. Moving the left joystick to the left or right causes the quad to yaw in that direction (i.e., it pivots about an imaginary vertical axis through the center of the vehicle). The right joystick controls pitch and roll. Simply put, whatever direction you move the right joystick will command the quad to tilt and translate in that direction.

    Most quads are arranged in an X configuration (when looking from above) with a motor/propeller at each corner. A rechargeable lithium polymer battery provides power for the motors and the electronic equipment onboard the quad. As a beginner, it isn’t really necessary to understand the function of all of a quad’s electronics. Those lessons will come as you progress in the hobby. For now, you just need to understand that the four motors work in unison, at different speeds, to keep a quad hovering and maneuvering through the air.                                                                                          drone6

    I’m Learning To Fly, But I Ain’t Got Wings

    One aspect of RC flight that many beginners have trouble with is the light touch that most quads and other RC aircraft demand. The overwhelming tendency of beginning pilots is to over-control and then overcorrect. The result is a herky-jerky flight path that that may or may not end well for the quad. Watching videos from these types of flights can make you turn green with nausea.

    Fly with a light touch. The overwhelming tendency of beginning pilots is to over-control and then overcorrect.

    Another hurdle for beginning pilots is overcoming the perspective of being outside the model. When the quad is in front of, and facing away from you, everything seems normal. Right is right, and forward is forward. When the nose of the quad is pointing towards you, however, the perspective changes. Now, when you command the quad to tilt to the right, you will see it tilt to your left. When you command it to tilt rearwards, it will move away from you. The quad is still responding to your commands the same way. It’s just that the quad’s right/left and front/back are no longer the same as yours.

    Perhaps the hardest thing about flying a quad is simply keeping track of which end is which. Quads lack the wings, tail surfaces, and other visual cues that you are used to seeing on airplanes and helicopters. So, it is often difficult to know which way the quad is pointed. Such disorientation leads to erroneous control inputs. Commanding a zig, when you meant to zag is the root cause of many crashes.

    While the challenges of becoming a competent quad pilot may seem daunting, I have yet to meet anyone that didn’t eventually get the hang of it. Most catch on rather quickly…especially kids. Mastering the necessary skills is simply a matter of getting some flight time under your belt and learning from your mistakes. And yes, that also means occasionally making repairs to your quad after an especially ham-fisted or harebrained flight.

    Where To Start

    Logging flight time does not mean that you have to put an expensive, camera-ready quad at the mercy of your fledgling skills. That would be like learning to juggle using flaming Ginsu knives or moody honey badgers. There are a couple of more sensible alternatives. One option is to get a RC flight simulator for your PC. The one I use is RealFlight 6.5, which includes a quad in its stock database of flying models. Just as important, RealFlight includes a USB controller with the same look and feel as a RC transmitter. This helps to make the transition from virtual flight to genuine flying pretty seamless.                                                                                                                                       drone7

    REALFLIGHT SOFTWARE IS GOOD FOR PRACTICE.

    One great thing about a software simulator is that it also lets you try your hand at RC airplanes and helicopters of all skills levels. It is really remarkable how broad the performance spectrum is for different models. Plus, no matter how badly you mangle the quad, airplane or helicopter on the screen, pressing the reset button will instantly make it as good as new!

    Another way to learn quad flight is to purchase a micro quad. These are small (about 5”x 5”) quads that look and behave the same way that larger quads do. They are really amazing little machines. The advantage of learning with a micro quad is that they have such low mass and so little power driving their tiny propellers that they are very unlikely to cause any harm when you smack them into something (and you will).                                                                                                                 drone8

    My first quad was the 1SQ from Heli-Max. It is a “hobby grade” micro quad, as opposed to “toy grade”. This means that you can buy spare parts and keep it going if you somehow find a way to damage it. My 1SQ absorbed quite a bit of abuse as I learned the basics of quads, and it is still going strong with nothing more than replacement propellers.

    Buying a micro quad with a gamepad-like transmitter or one that is controlled by an iphone won’t really help you transition to larger, more capable quads.

    eBay is flooded with all types of micro quads. Some appear to be genuine, while others are obvious knock-offs of popular hobby-grade quads. Then, there are other quads of even more questionable pedigree. Honestly, I don’t know how to tell the good eBay finds from the bad. My recommendation is to spend a few more bucks and buy a micro-quad from your local hobby shop. If you decide to go the eBay (or similar) route, at least make sure that the micro-quad you choose includes a 2-stick transmitter. Buying a micro quad with a gamepad-like transmitter or one that is controlled by an iphone won’t really help you transition to larger, more capable quads.

    A neat thing about micro quads is that you can fly them indoors. Foul weather and darkness need not impede your training. As I said, you will bump into things as you learn (and beyond). So be sensible and stay away from pets, kids, the plasma screen, Aunt Edith’s urn…you get the idea. And for Pete’s sake, turn off the ceiling fan! Other than exercising those precautions, there is little to worry about. As your piloting skills progress, you can challenge yourself to increasingly difficult tasks. You may start out just trying to land on the coffee table. In time, you’ll be dusting your ceramic frog collection with the micro quad’s rotor wash.                                                                            drone9

    Stepping Up

    Once you feel that you have the hang of quad flying, it’s time to upgrade to something capable of carrying a high quality camera. It is worth mentioning that there are some micro quads with integrated cameras (including the V-Cam version of the 1SQ). These quads are also a lot of fun and you can get some good experience tackling the challenges of filming without the benefit of a viewfinder. Just don’t expect the image quality to meet the level that we’ve become accustomed to from GoPro and similar cameras.

    Beyond micro quads, there is a lot of room to grow in terms of cost and capabilities, but let’s focus on the next logical step. The DJI Phantom is a very popular quad that is capable of carrying a GoPro camera. The Phantom includes all of the things that you want in an intermediate quad: attitude stabilization, brushless motors, a GPS unit, a built-in GoPro mount, etc. What has made the Phantom so popular is that all of these components come preconfigured and integrated as a flight-ready system. You can bring home a Phantom and have it flying in the time it takes to charge the included battery (about an hour).                                                                                                              drone10

    If you choose to buy a Phantom, I think you will agree that it is considerably easier to fly than a micro quad. I’ve found the Phantom’s stabilization and position-holding ability to be rock solid. I can park it in the sky and take my hands off of the joysticks. Even if there is a light breeze, the Phantom will stay in place until I command it to go somewhere else.

    Unlike micro quads, the Phantom has enough mass and horsepower to cause grief when you hit something with it. The conscientious world citizen in you should want no part in causing a dent in a car, or maybe buying stitches for a stranger. The savvy economist in you should never forget that you don’t want to squander the nearly $1000 tied up in a Phantom with the latest GoPro by crashing it into a lake. Play it safe on both counts with your first flights and find a nice open space devoid of other people. You will appreciate the elbow room until you get comfortable flying the Phantom. Even later, you should always ask yourself “Is it safe to fly here?”

    Some makers will shun the turnkey approach afforded by the Phantom, since it’s an all-in-one package that works out of the box. Fortunately, DJI and other companies offer many quads in kit form. This lets you choose the components you want and customize the quad to your liking. Taking the DIY route also provides you with an intimate knowledge of how the different components of a quad work in unison to achieve controlled flight.

    What’s Next?

    You may find that a Phantom/GoPro combo is all that you need to satisfy your aerial photography ambitions. For many fliers, however, this stage is a gateway to more capable set-ups. One popular upgrade is to add a First Person View (FPV) system. FPV provides a real-time video downlink from the quad. When you connect that downlink to a portable screen or video goggles, you get the same bird’s eye view as the onboard camera…neat stuff for sure. FPV systems are often coupled with a two-axis gimbal that lets you pan and tilt the camera during flight. Just be aware that most FPV systems require a HAM Technician license to operate legally.                                                                    drone11

    GEAR FOR FPV FLYING.

    GoPro Heroes are awesome little cameras that will serve you well. If, however, you yearn to carry higher end video equipment, there is probably a multi-rotor to fit the bill. The cost and complexity of these aircraft climb accordingly. Most of the larger multi-rotors have six or eight motors. Some of these units can run several thousand dollars (without video equipment). It’s a matter of balancing your budget and skills with the image quality that you aim to achieve.

    Finding Solidarity and Community

    With the ever-growing popularity of quads, there’s no reason to jump in to the hobby alone. Unless you live way out in the boonies, there is probably an established quad flyer not too far away. Search for RC clubs and hobby shops in your area to get started. Most RCers are happy to share their knowledge and experience. There are also numerous online forums that discuss all aspects of quads and other RC endeavors. My favorite is RCGroups.com. The only problem with online forums is filtering out the genuine good advice from the well-meaning misinformation of self-proclaimed experts. With a little lurking, you can usually pick out who the trustworthy members are.

    You should also consider joining the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA), which is a national organization that provides a united voice for all types of aeromodelers. In fact, AMA membership is a prerequisite for joining most local RC clubs. Among other things, the $58 annual dues provide an insurance policy for you and help the AMA in its efforts to protect modelers from unnecessary regulations. This is especially important now, as the FAA is considering folding model aircraft operations into its jurisdiction.

    Get Going!

    This beginner’s guide is admittedly light on technical information. There will be plenty of time for that stuff once you’re ready to buy a quad of your own. I hope, however, that the roadmap presented here will help you to avoid some of the common mistakes and misconceptions of budding multi-rotor pilots. Flying quads is a lot of fun, and shooting videos only sweetens the deal. It just takes a little bit of training and situational awareness to be successful. Now go have fun and make a video worthy of awards, not the news! Credits: TERRY DUNN  http://www.tested.com/  http:// http://

     

     

How to Fly a Quadcopter – The Ultimate Guide

How-to-Fly-a-Quadcopter-The-Ultimate-Guide-Cover-Image

This guide will show you how to fly a quadcopter, step-by-step.

Everyone goes through different struggles when piloting a quadcopter for the first time. UAV flying definitely has a learning curve.

So if you’re having trouble flying your quad, you’re just getting started, or you’re looking to hone your skills — don’t worry.

You’re in the right place.

No matter your quadcopter model, this guide will help you prepare for your first flight, stay safe, get airborne, and learn some basic and advanced quadcopter flying techniques.

Our goal is to give you a guide that will take out all of the guess work – from going through a pre-flight checklist, learning the controls, controlling your quadcopter’s flight pattern, and even some advanced techniques. Have fun!

Definitions

General terms:

Line of site – The pilot can see their quadcopter during flight.

FPV (First Person View) — The pilot can see where they’re flying through the UAV’s camera.

Parts:

Transmitter/Remote Control – The hand-held device that allows you to maneuver the quadcopter and adjust its settings.

Propellers – They spin according to the manual controls of the pilot. The intensity of the spin correlates to the intensity of the quadcopter’s movement.

Camera – Many quadcopters either come with a camera or allow the pilot to attach a camera to them. This is how pilots practice aerial videography and photography. (A camera came in second place when we interviewed UAV experts about their favorite drone accessory.)

(Note: For simplicity’s sake, this article assumes that the left stick controls yaw and throttle, and the right stick controls roll and pitch. Some transmitters allow the pilot to switch these controls based on what’s most comfortable.)

Roll – Done by pushing the right stick to the left or right. Literally rolls the quadcopter, which maneuvers the quadcopter left or right.

Pitch – Done by pushing the right stick forwards or backwards. Tilts the quadcopter, which maneuvers the quadcopter forwards or backwards.

Yaw – Done by pushing the left stick to the left or to the right. Rotates the quadcopter left or right. Points the front of the copter different directions and helps with changing directions while flying.

Throttle – Engaged by pushing the left stick forwards. Disengaged by pulling the left stick backwards. This adjusts the altitude, or height, of the quadcopter.

Trim – Buttons on the remote control that help you adjust roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle if they are off balance.

The Rudder – You might hear this term thrown around, but it’s the same as the left stick. However, it relates directly to controlling yaw (as opposed to the throttle).

Aileron – Same as the right stick. However, it relates directly to controlling roll (left and right movement).

The Elevator – Same as the right stick. However, it relates directly to controlling pitch (forwards and backwards movement).

Maneuvering:

Bank turn – A consistent circular turn in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Hovering – Staying in the same position while airborne. Done by controlling the throttle.

Figure 8 – Flying in a “figure 8” pattern.

Flight modes:

(Flight modes can typically be adjusted with certain buttons on your remote control/transmitter.)

Manual – Similar to flying a helicopter. Once you tilt the quadcopter (roll) it will not auto-level itself back to its original position. Even if you let go of the stick and it returns to the middle, the quadcopter will stay tilted.

Attitude (Auto-level) – Once the sticks are centered, the copter will level itself out.

GPS Hold – Returns the quadcopter’s position once the sticks have been centered. The same as attitude mode (auto-level) but using a GPS.

Quadcopter Controls

When learning how to fly a quadcopter, the controls will become your bread and butter.

They will become second nature once you know how they act individually and how they interact together to form a complete flying experience.

With any of these controls, the harder you push the stick, the stronger your quadcopter will move in either direction.

When you first start out, push the sticks very gently so the quadcopter performs slight movements.

As you get more comfortable, you can make sharper movements.

There are four main quadcopter controls:

  • Roll
  • Pitch
  • Yaw
  • Throttle

Roll, Pitch, Yaw, and Throttle of a Quadcopter - Image 1

Simple sketch of roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle on a transmitter (left image) and quadcopter (right image).

(Image source: Quadcopters Are Fun)

Let’s go through each of them.

Roll

Roll moves your quadcopter left or right. It’s done by pushing the right stick on your transmitter to the left or to the right.

It’s called “roll” because it literally rolls the quadcopter.

For example, as you push the right stick to the right, the quadcopter will angle diagonally downwards to the right.

Explaining a Quadcopter's Roll - Image 2

Example of a quadcopter rolling left and right. Notice the tilt of the quadcopter and the angle of the propellers.

(Image source: Best Quadcopter Spot)

Here, the bottom of the propellers will be facing to the left. This pushes air to the left, forcing the quadcopter to fly to the right.

The same thing happens when you push the stick to the left, except now the propellers will be pushing air to the right, forcing the copter to fly to the left.

Pitch

Pitch is done by pushing the right stick on your transmitter forwards or backwards. This will tilt the quadcopter, resulting in forwards or backwards movement.

Explaining a Quadcopter's Pitch - Image 3

Example of a quadcopter pitching forwards and backwards. Note that this view is from the left side.

Yaw

Yaw was a little bit confusing for me in the beginning. Essentially, it rotates the quadcopter clockwise or counterclockwise.

This is done by pushing the left stick to the left or to the right.

Check out the video below for an example.

(Watch from 3:00 to 3:40 and pay attention to how he adjusts the sticks.)

 

Yaw is typically used at the same time as throttle during continuous flight. This allows the pilot to make circles and patterns. It also allows videographers and photographers to follow objects that might be changing directions.

Throttle

Throttle gives the propellers on your quadcopter enough power to get airborne. When flying, you will have the throttle engaged constantly.

 

To engage the throttle, push the left stick forwards. To disengage, pull it backwards.

Make sure not to disengage completely until you’re a couple inches away from the ground. Otherwise, you might damage the quadcopter, and your training will be cut short.

Important note:

When the quadcopter is facing you (instead of facing away from you) the controls are all switched.

This makes intuitive sense…

  • Pushing the right stick to the right moves the quadcopter to the right (roll)
  • Pushing the right stick forward moves the quadcopter forward (pitch)
  • Pushing the right stick backward moves the quadcopter backward (pitch)
  • And so on.

So pay attention to that as you start changing directions. Always be thinking in terms of how the quadcopter will move, rather than how the copter is oriented towards you.

Getting to Know Your Remote Control/Transmitter

A transmitter is a hand-held controller that lets you pilot your quadcopter and control its flight pattern. When you make an adjustment with the sticks, it sends a signal to your copter telling it what to do next.

Check out this picture describing each part of the transmitter:
How-to-Fly-a-Quadcopter-Trasmitter-Labels-Image

(Image source: Alibaba)

Right Stick

The right stick controls roll and pitch.

In other words, it moves your quadcopter left/right and backwards/forwards.

Left Stick

The left stick controls yaw and throttle.

In other words, it rotates your quadcopter clockwise or counterclockwise, and it adjusts the height at which you are flying.

Trim Buttons

Each control has its own trim button, as you can see from the image below.

Trim Buttons on a Transmitter - Image

(Image source: Quadcopter 101)

When you first push your throttle to get your quadcopter off the ground, you may notice that the UAV automatically tilts and flies to one direction (or multiple).

This happens when the controls are unbalanced. To balance them out, certain controls need to be trimmed.

Check out the beginning of this video, where the pilot trims a few of his controls:

(Watch from 0:47 to 1:07)

 

If this happens, you can use the corresponding trim button to adjust the control’s natural intensity. This will stabilize the copter when pushing the throttle.

An Overview of the Main Quadcopter Parts

When learning how to fly a quadcopter, it’s important to understand the machine you’re commanding.

If something goes wrong, you want to be able to diagnose and fix the issue. You also want to understand the capabilities of each part and how they play into flying a quadcopter.

Here are the main parts of a quadcopter:

  • The frame
  • Motors
  • Electronic Speed Control (ESC)
  • Flight Control Board
  • Radio Transmitter and Receiver
  • Propellers
  • Battery and Charger

The frame connects all of the other components. For a quadcopter, it’s shaped in either an X or a + shape.

If you’re building your own quadcopter, you want to consider the size and weight of the frame and how it will affect your flying experience.

The motors spin the propellers. A quadcopter needs four motors, because one motor powers a single propeller.

The higher the kV, the faster the motor will spin. Kv is often quoted in RPM per volt, which means that a 1000 Kv motor on a 10V supply will rotate just under 10,000 rpm at no load.

Electric Speed Controls (ESCs) are wired components that connect the motors and the battery. They relay a signal to the motors that tells them how fast to spin.

At any one time, each of your motors could be spinning at different speeds. This is what lets you maneuver and change direction. It’s all conducted by the Electronic Speed Controls, so they’re very important.

The Flight Control Board is the “commander of operations”. It controls the accelerometer and gyroscopes, which control how fast each motor spins.

The radio transmitter is your remote control, and the receiver is the antenna on the copter that talks to the remote control. When you make an adjustment on the transmitter, the receiver is what understands that adjustment and sends it to the rest of the quadcopter system.

A quadcopter has 4 propellers, and each one helps determine which direction the quadcopter flies or whether it hovers in place.

The battery is the power source for the whole quadcopter. This needs to be charged and recharged, because without a battery, you cannot fly your quadcopter.

The charger charges your battery so you can take multiple flights.

(Pro tip: We recommend buying multiple batteries. This way, you won’t have to wait for the first battery to charge in order to take more flights. You can charge the first battery while you insert the second, third, fourth one, etc.)

The Pre-Flight Checklist (Do NOT Skip This)

Going through a pre-flight checklist will keep you and your copter safe.

It will also make sure you don’t waste time fixing components and getting things ready, when you could be having a blast flying your quad.

Here’s a checklist you can use before each flight:

  • If you have a camera, check that you have your micro SD card inserted.
  • Make sure the transmitter battery is charged.
  • Make sure the quadcopter battery is charged.
  • Insert the battery.
  • Make sure the battery is inserted securely.
  • Make sure each propeller is secure.
  • Check that there are no loose parts on the quadcopter.
  • Check for missing or loose screws.
  • Turn on the transmitter.
  • If your copter needs to calibrate and get satellite lock, wait until it finishes.
  • Make sure there is enough room for launch and flight.
  • Make sure the throttle (left stick) is all the way down.
  • Turn on the transmitter.
  • Back away 3 or 4 steps (or to a safe distance).
  • Keep facing the quadcopter the entire time.
  • Keep a direct line of site at all times when flying, so you can always see your quadcopter. You want to keep a direct line of site so you know when you’re about to crash. Also, sometimes, quadcopters can fly out of the range of the transmitter’s signal, which can cause your copter to fly off on its own (bye bye quadcopter). Keep the transmitter’s range in mind, and don’t let your quadcopter fly out of that range.

How to Fly a Quadcopter – Choosing a Place to Learn

Any UAV pilot will tell you that learning to pilot a quadcopter in an enclosed space is asking for something to go wrong – either with you, your belongings, or the drone itself.

As you get more experienced, and your control becomes natural, flying in tight spaces will be a cinch.

But as a beginner, choose a place that will minimize the impact any mistakes might have.

We suggest starting out in a large, open space, such as a park or a field. Many people prefer to learn on grassy ground, so if the quadcopter needs to make a crash landing, it will at least have some sort of cushion.

Next, stay away from people or animals. Any crashes could cause serious injury.

And finally, wind can be your worst enemy when learning the nuances of flying. To reduce the chance of flying in the wind, try to fly in the morning.

Important Safety Precautions

Quadcopters are basically flying lawnmowers.

They can be dangerous if not operated carefully.

Here are some quadcopter safety precautions to keep in mind:

  • If you’re about to crash into something, turn the throttle down to zero, so you don’t potentially destroy your quadcopter, injure somebody, or injure yourself.
  • Keep your fingers away from the propellers when they’re moving.
  • Unplug/take out the battery of the quad before doing any work on it. If it turns on accidentally and the propellers start spinning, you might have a tough time doing future flights with missing fingers.
  • If you’re a beginner learning to fly indoors, tie the quadcopter down or surround it by a cage.

    How to Get Your Quadcopter Off the Ground

    Alright! Now that you understand the controls and you’ve taken all of the right safety precautions, you’re ready to fly.

    To get your quadcopter in the air, the only control you need is the throttle.

    Push the throttle (left stick) up very slowly, just to get the propellers going. Then stop.

    Repeat this multiple times and until you’re comfortable with the throttle’s sensitivity.

    Slowly push the throttle further than before, until the copter lifts off the ground. Then pull the throttle back down to zero and let the quadcopter land.                                                                               (Watch from 1:15 to 1:40)

     

    Repeat this 3-5 times. Notice whether the copter is trying to rotate left or right (yaw), move left or right (roll), or move backwards or forwards (pitch).

    If you notice any movements happening without you making them happen, use the corresponding trim button to balance them out.

    For example, if you notice the copter moving to the left when you push the throttle, adjust the “roll” trim button next to the right stick.

    Keep adjusting the trims until you get a relatively stable hover off the ground by only using the throttle.

    Congrats! You know how to get your quadcopter airborne.

    Now, let’s learn how to hover in mid-air.

    How to Hover in Mid-Air and Land

    To hover, you will use the throttle to get airborne. You will then use small adjustments of the right stick to keep the quadcopter hovering in place.

    You may also need to adjust the left stick (yaw) slightly, to keep it from turning.

    Use the throttle to get the copter about a foot to a foot-and-a-half off the ground.

    Make tiny adjustments with the right stick (and the left, if necessary) to keep the copter hovering in position.

    When you’re ready to land, cut back the throttle slowly.

    When the quadcopter is an inch or two off the ground, go ahead and cut the throttle completely and let the UAV drop to the ground.

    Repeat this until you get comfortable hovering off the ground and landing gently.

    Flying Left/Right and Forwards/Backwards

    To fly a quadcopter left, right, forwards, and backwards, you will need to hold the throttle at a steady rate to keep it airborne. You will then use the right stick to maneuver the quadcopter in the direction you want it to go.

    First, bring your copter to a hover.

    Push the right stick forward to fly it a couple feet forward.

    Pull the right stick back to bring it back to its original position.

    Now, move it further backwards a couple feet, and return it to its original position.

    Push the right stick to the left to move your copter a couple feet to the left.

    Move it back to its original position, then fly it a couple feet to the right.

    If it starts to rotate (yaw), adjust the left stick to the left or right to keep the copter facing the same direction.

    (Pro tip: When you move in either direction, you will probably notice the quadcopter dropping in altitude. To keep the copter at the same altitude, push the throttle and give it more power whenever you turn or move.)

    How to Pilot Your Quadcopter in a Square Pattern

    You’ve gotten off the ground, and you know how to fly a quadcopter in the four basic directions.

    Now, it’s time to combine these skills and start flying in patterns. This will help you get a feel for simultaneously engaging the controls.

    To fly in a square pattern, keep the quadcopter facing away from you the entire time.

    Push the right stick forward (pitch) and fly forward a couple feet. Then, return the right stick to the middle and hover in place.

    Then push the right stick to the right (roll) and fly to the right a couple feet. Then, hover in place for a few seconds.

     

    Pull the right stick backwards and fly backwards a couple feet. Then, hover in place for a few seconds, and push the right stick to the left and return the quadcopter to its original position.

    You’ve just flown in a square! Keep doing this until you get comfortable with it, and then move on to our next pattern – flying in a circle.

    How to Fly a Quadcopter in a Circle

    This is where you will hone your simultaneous control skills.

    To fly a quadcopter in a circle, you will use pitch, roll, and throttle at the same time.

    As usual, use the throttle to get airborne. Then, decide whether you want to fly clockwise or counterclockwise.

    For this example, we’ll assume you’re flying clockwise (to the right).

    Keep the quadcopter facing away from you, and push the right stick diagonally up and to the right. This will engage both pitch and roll at the same time, and start flyinging the quadcopter in a circle to the right.

    After a couple feet, start rotating the right stick more to the right, so you engage more roll. This will start maneuvering your quadcopter to the right.

    After a few more feet, start rotating the right stick diagonally to the bottom right, and continue to circle the right stick around until the copter returns to its original position.

    Try changing directions, and slowly rotating the right stick to fly in a circle. If you notice the quadcopter starting to rotate and face different directions, adjust the quadcopter’s yaw by pushing the left stick to the left or right.

    How to Rotate (Yaw) Your Quadcopter

    To rotate your quadcopter, use the throttle to get airborne.

    Once at a comfortable hover, push the left stick in either direction. This will rotate the quadcopter in place.

    Rotate it 360 degrees. Then push the left stick in the opposite direction and rotate it 360 degrees the other way.

    Keep doing this until you’re comfortable with it.

    Flying a Quadcopter Continuously

    Flying a quadcopter continuously requires you to rotate and change directions simultaneously.

    This will take some getting used to, because the quadcopter will be facing different angles in relation to how you’re facing, so you will need to pay close attention to how each movement of the sticks will affect the quadcopter’s flight.

    First, take off and hover.

    Rotate (yaw) your copter to a slight angle.

    Use the right stick to fly it left/right and forwards/backwards. Get comfortable flying the quadcopter while it faces a different direction.

    Rotate it to another angle, and use the right stick to maneuver it again.

    Keep doing this until you’re comfortable flying at different angles.

    To fly continuously, slowly push the right stick forward.

    As you’re pushing the right stick forward, push the right stick slightly to the left or to the right at the same time.

    Fly in different directions by pushing the right stick forward (pitch) and adjusting it left and right, and using the left stick (yaw) to change the direction the copter is facing.

 

Then, try adjusting the quadcopter’s height by moving the left stick forward and backward (throttle).

Congrats! Now you know how to fly a quadcopter with continuous movement.

Keep practicing until you can direct your quadcopter at will. Then, move on to the next section, where we’ll discuss different milestones for you to shoot for.

Different Milestones to Pass

Use these milestones to keep you organized during the learning process.

They will help you gauge where you’re at and what you should be going for next.

  • Learn how the four main quadcopter controls – roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle – affect a quadcopter’s movement.
  • Understand the parts of your quadcopter and what each of them does.
  • Prepare a pre-flight checklist and go through it before each take off.
  • Understand the safety precautions.
  • Use the throttle to get airborne, and make any necessary adjustments using the trim buttons.
  • Get comfortable hovering in mid-air and gently landing your quadcopter.
  • Take off to an altitude of 3 feet and land in the same position.
  • Take off to an altitude of 3 feet and spin the UAV around 180 degrees.
  • Get comfortable flying your quadcopter left/right and forwards/backwards.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter in a square pattern.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter in a circle.
  • Learn how to rotate (yaw) a quadcopter.
  • Learn how to fly a quadcopter continuously.
  • Do all of the above, but at an altitude of 25 feet.

Beginner’s Quadcopter Flying Techniques

Here are some beginner flying techniques for you to master:

  1. Hover in place.
  2. Hover and rotate the quadcopter.
  3. Rotate the quadcopter to different angles, and fly it left/right and forwards/backwards until you’re comfortable flying a quadcopter without it facing the same direction as you.
  4. Fly your quadcopter in a square pattern.
  5. Fly your quadcopter in a circle.
  6. Fly at different heights.
  7. Pick two targets on the ground, and repeatedly land, fly, and land on each one.

Check out this video for an example of #7:

(Watch from 4:33 to 4:57)

And if you’re still struggling to get the hang of it, Korey Smith from My First Drone put together a useful bank turns video as well.

Next Steps

Congrats on finishing our “How to Fly a Quadcopter” drone pilot training guide! We hope it gets you on your way to flying a quadcopter like a pro.                                                                                                               Credits: http://uavcoach.com/  http:// http://

Why the US Government Is Terrified of Hobbyist Drones

A staff member from DJI Technology demonstrates the DJI Phantom 2 VIsion+ drone. Click to Open Overlay GalleryA staff member from DJI Technology demonstrates the DJI Phantom 2 VIsion+ drone. Kin Cheung/AP

IF YOU WANT to understand why the government freaked out when a $400 remote-controlled quadcopter landed on the White House grounds last week, you need to look four miles away, to a small briefing room in Arlington, Virginia. There, just 10 days earlier, officials from the US military, the Department of Homeland Security, and the FAA gathered for a DHS “summit” on a danger that had been consuming them privately for years: the potential use of hobbyist drones as weapons of terror or assassination.

The conference was open to civilians, but explicitly closed to the press. One attendee described it as an eye-opener. The officials played videos of low-cost drones firing semi-automatic weapons, revealed that Syrian rebels are importing consumer-grade drones to launch attacks, and flashed photos from an exercise that pitted $5,000 worth of drones against a convoy of armored vehicles. (The drones won.) But the most striking visual aid was on an exhibit table outside the auditorium, where a buffet of low-cost drones had been converted into simulated flying bombs. One quadcopter, strapped to 3 pounds of inert explosive, was a DJI Phantom 2, a newer version of the very drone that would land at the White House the next week.

Attendee Daniel Herbert snapped a photo and posted it to his website along with detailed notes from the conference. The day after the White House incident, he says, DHS phoned him and politely asked him to remove the entire post. He complied. “I’m not going to be the one to challenge Homeland Security and cause more contention,” says Herbert, who runs a small drone shop in Delaware called Skygear Solutions.  A Phantom 2 consumer drone is equipped with three pounds of mock explosive at a January 16 DHS conference.Click to Open Overlay GalleryA DJI Phantom 2 drone is equipped with three pounds of mock explosive at a January 16 DHS conference. Daniel Herbert

The White House drone, of course, wasn’t packing an explosive and wasn’t piloted by a terrorist—just a Washingtonian who lost control of the device while playing around in the wee hours. But the gentle censorship directed at Herbert illustrates how serious the issue is to counterterrorism officials.

A Drone Maker Takes Decisive Action

The Phantom line of consumer drones made by China-based DJI figures prominently in the government’s attack scenarios. That’s not because there’s anything sinister about DJI or the Phantom—in fact, just the opposite. The Phantom is the iPod of drones, cheap, easy to use, and as popular with casual and first-time fliers as with experienced radio control enthusiasts.

With all the attention surrounding the White House landing, DJI felt it had to take action. So last Thursday it pushed a“mandatory firmware update” for its Phantom 2 that would prevent the drone from flying in a 15.5 mile radius of the White House. So far it’s the only drone-maker installing what’s known as GPS geofencing.  http://

The technique is not new to DJI. The company first added no-fly zones to its firmware in April of last year to deter newbie pilots from zipping into the restricted airspace over airports, where they might interfere with departing and arriving aircraft. If a Phantom 2 pilot flies within five miles of a major airport’s no fly zone, the drone’s maximum altitude begins to taper. At 1.5 miles away, it lands and refuses to take off again. Municipal airports are protected by smaller zones, also programmed into the drones’ firmware.

For DJI, airport no-fly zones were a response to the growing popularity of the Phantom 2 and perhaps a hedge against the constant threat of increased regulation. “We started seeing the community of pilots grow,” says spokesman Michael Perry, and many users have no idea where they can and can’t legally fly the drone. “The guy in the White House incident, I’m pretty sure he didn’t know that flying in downtown DC is illegal.” Rather than put the onus on every user to learn local air traffic zoning rules, DJI translated them into code, and added a little buffer zone of its own for added safety.

The White House geofence is only the second one that isn’t centered on an airport, according to Perry—the first was Tiananmen Square. It won’t be the last. Now that the company has perfected the ability to erect geofences at will, the sky’s the limit—or, more accurately, the skies are limited. DJI is preparing an update that will increase the number of airport no fly zones from 710 to 10,000, and prevent users from flying across some national borders—a reaction to the recent discovery that drug smugglers are trying to use drones to fly small loads of meth from Mexico into the US.

‘I Want to Fly Wherever the Heck I Want’

This geofencing has critics, including hobbyists chagrined to find their favorite flying spot suddenly encompassed by a DJI no-fly zones. “I live just inside a red zone and find it quite offensive that a company would attempt to restrict any potential usage in/around my own house,” one user wrote in response to the first geofencing update last April.

“One could theorize that every zone anywhere could be a restricted zone,” wrote another. “Thank you but no thank you. If I spend thousands of dollars then I want to fly wherever the heck I want as long as it is under 400ft and 500ft away from airports.”

“This is NOT something users want,” another critic added. “I have a good relationship with my local airports and have worked with every local tower or control center. I get clearance to fly and they have been great, but this ‘update’ takes away my control.”

Ryan Calo, a University of Washingtonlaw professor who studies robots and the law, traces the resistance to two sources. “One is a complaint about restricting innovation. The second one says you should own your own stuff, and it’s a liberty issue: corporate verses individual control and autonomy,” Calo says. “When I purchase something I own it, and when someone else controls what I own, it will be serving someone else’s interest, not mine.”

DJI, in other words, has flown into one a core discontent of the Internet age. Technology’s no-fly zones already are everywhere. Lexmark printers and Keurig coffee makers have been programmed to reject third-party ink cartridges and coffee pods. Auto dealers are beginning to install remote-control immobilizers in cars sold to sub-prime borrowers, so they can shut down a driver who’s delinquent with an auto payment (the technology already has resulted in a 100-vehicle automotive hack attack.) In 2009, some Kindle owners discovered Amazon has the power to remotely delete the book they’re reading, after the company purged George Orwell’s 1984 and Animal Farm from e-book readers, an action Jeff Bezos later apologized for .

“The fate of small drone flights over DC may seem like a little thing—a spat worked out among private players,” wrote EFF’s Parker Higgins in a blog post Monday. “But these small battles shape the notion of what it means to own something and illustrate the growing control of manufacturers over user conduct.”

Geofencing Won’t Prevent Terrorism

While alarming to some, DJI’s paternal interference in its customers’ flight plans probably will reduce unintentional incidents like last week’s White House landing. But it certainly won’t prevent the scenario feared by official Washington: an attacker looking to weaponize a drone. For one thing, hardcore drone hobbyists tend to be tinkerers, and sooner or later their rumbling will translate into published firmware hacks and workarounds anyone can use.

“Right now there doesn’t exist any hacks to remove the geofencing or downgrade the firmware,” says Herbert. “I’m sure they’re coming. People will figure it out eventually.”

But, he notes, drone fliers who don’t want geofencing have many options. DJI’s mandatory update only affects the Phantom 2 line—ironically, the older Phantom 1 that landed at the White House isn’t included. And Phantom 2 owners will receive the mandatory update only when they link their drone to their Internet-connected PC or Mac. And if you really want to exercise your own judgment when flying, DJI says you can simply buy from a competitor.

“We do provide different layers of security to make it difficult to hack and get around,” says DJI’s Perry. But for those determined to avoid geofencing, “there’s an easy way to do that, which is to buy another quad-copter.”

That may be true for now, but it’s easy to see lawmakers and regulators jumping on DJI’s mandatory update as an easy cure, and mandating geofencing industrywide. When that happens, you can expect that circumventing drone firmware, for any reason, will become illegal, the same way hacking your car’s programming is illegal. One thing is for certain: Nobody willing to strap a bomb to a toy drone will be deterred.   http://Remote Control Toys on Sale

Best Quadcopter Reviews for All Skill Levels

Every quadcopter pilot needs high-tech equipment and the best quadcopter that works perfectly for their skill level. There are hundreds of different types of rc helicopters such as quad, hexa, tri and DIY quadcopters so there is bound to be one that fits your skills perfectly. I myself started at the bottom flying beginner level copters. Since then I have worked my way up to advanced level copters, giving myself knowledge of the features and skill level necessary to fly a variety of quadcopters and rc helicopters.

Over my years of flying I have flown some of the most simply built quads to the most intricately designed allowing me to put together an in-depth compilation of the best quads for novice, intermediate, and professional fliers. Every quadcopter has specific features that make it better suited for a beginner versus a professional or vice versa. After all the times I’ve crashed and burned, I can definitely put my two sense in on the quads that are more difficult to fly than others. Regardless of what skill level you’re shopping for  you will have much more knowledge when it comes to finding the best drone for you by reading our quadcopter reviews. From mounts and gimbals, to DIY and RTF quadcopters, we have it all!

If you are just starting out, chances are you’re not going to be ready for an fpv quadcopter. You will just need a simple quadcopter without many special features; the best quadcopter for beginners is one that you will be able to part with when it’s crashed and  won’t be too expensive to replace or fix. I wouldn’t want you to make the same mistake I did and buy a $1,000 dollar quad to practice on. No matter how big of a man you are, I guarantee you will shed a tear when your pride and joy torpedoes into a tree right before your eyes.

For more advanced fliers a quadcopter that is more heavy duty, can handle the weight of a gimbal, or is already fitted with a camera will be your best bet. By now you can control almost any quadcopter and are ready to start focusing more of your attention on your aerial photography and video skills. Now that the major learning curve is in the past it’s possible for you to turn this hobby into a profession! Who wouldn’t love to get professional aerial photography taken, or their taco delivered via drone?Below I have compiled a list of the best quadcopters based on their quadcopter reviews and my individual experience flying them to make your decision easier for you.               http://amzn.to/1IpBPPE

Quadcopter Reviews

 

When deciding on what is the best quadcopter to purchase you need to make sure you get one that is suitable for your skill level. There is no need to go out and buy the most expensive version you can find when you have absolutely no experience. Start off with something halfway cheap and get some flights under your belt before moving on to the best of the best. Here are some of the top rated, and what I find to be the best quadcopters based on skill level. Always remember to read the quadcopter reviews to see what other people have to say about the copter you want.

 

Beginners

Hubsan X4 H107

quad36
There are many different versions of the Hubsan X4 quad and they all have good quadcopter reviews. The best one for abeginner quadcopter enthusiast though is the original Hubsan X4 H107. This one is 100% ready to fly and includes a 2.4GHz radio and a rechargeable 3.7 V 240 mAh battery. Considering it comes with everything needed to fly out of the box, the only thing you need to do before you get flying is charge your battery. The battery takes about 30 minutes to charge and allows you to get almost 10 minutes of flying time. Due to the lightweight airframe, ultimate stability, and small size of 60 mmx60 mm, you will get longer flight time which equates to more practice time! This is the best drone for flying indoors or outdoors but just be sure it’s not windy while flying outside.

Syma X1

quad37

The best copter for beginners in my opinion is the Syma X1 and the quadcopter reviews will agree. It is equipped with the latest 3-axis flight control system enabling it to have an incredibly stable flight. You’re going to want to practice most of the time but it’s also nice to be able to have a bit of fun. Even when I was first starting out this quadcopter gave me the ability to perform tricky pirouettes, flips, rolls, and more. It has a full 3D flight which gives you the freedom to go up, down, left, right, forward, backward, leftward flight, and rightward flight. There’s so much learning potential with this quad and at such a great price!

 

 

Estes 4606 Proto X Nano

quad35
Great for enthusiasts just starting out, the Estes 4606 Proto X Nano has a plastic body and should only be flown indoors. This was actually my first quadcopter I bought after reading it’s quadcopter reviews and I’m thankful it didn’t break every time I flew it into a wall. For the rare occasion when I broke a blade, there were conveniently 4 spare rotor blades included with the quad. There are even LED indicators on both the front and back which help you stay oriented during flight. Unless you’re holding your quadcopter in your hand, it’s very difficult to determine the front and back so the lights are a lifesaver  especially in dim light. Included with the Estes 4606 is a 4-channel 2.4 GHz radio and a 100mAh 3.7 V LiPo battery making this a complete RTF quadcopter right out of the box.

 

 

 Intermediate

DJI Phantom Aerial UAV quad38 This quad is a good step up from an inexpensive, simple beginner quad, but this is the largest jump I would make going up from a beginner version. You remain to have the simplicity of a RTF quadcopter but you also gain multiple innovative features with the higher price. Before stepping up to this level be sure you have a pretty good handle on basic controls to avoid demolishing the Phantom into the side of a tree. Once your Phantom arrives the only tasks you will need to complete before your first flight is charging the battery and attaching the landing gear and propellers. The transmitter included with the Phantom is pre-tuned by the factor and only needs 4 AA batteries installed before your first flight. The speed is a big jump between the toy you used to have and the technical beast that has just landed in your possession. The maximum speed is 22 mph and still allows you to capture action shots of any event, sport, or scene. The Phantom comes automatically fit with a GoPro mount but the camera must be purchased separately. You will be able to take aerial photos and videos like never before with the Phantom and GoPro super team.

 

  Parrot A.R. Drone 2.0 quad39 There are many cool perks of this quad that makes it the best quadcopter if you’re kind of in between skill levels. First off, it has an incredibly robust structure which is built to withstand crashes and absorb impacts. The body is crafted out of foam which isolates the expensive parts to keep them safe and absorb vibrations creating a smoother flight. Also included with the Parrot A.R. Drone 2.0 is an inside hull which further protect your quad from damage. Even if you’re not fully advanced to an intermediate level yet, you can still move up to the Parrot and use the hull until you’ve reached perfection. The most advanced feature incorporated into the Parrot is the ability to control your drone via iPhone, iPad or any Android device. From your device, you can view life steaming video from your Parrot and fly via FPV. You can also record and share photos and videos directly from the FreeFlight 2.0 app. This may seem like a huge jump from a basic toy quad but as long as you start out with the hall and work your way up to fpv flying, the Parrot should last you many years of flying. DJI Phantom 3 Standard quad40 While I wouldn’t normally consider the DJI Phantom 3 an intermediate level drone, DJI has made the standard model affordable enough to barely make the cut. However, I wouldn’t recommend going straight from a mini drone to something of this caliber. Even though the Phantom 3 is extremely easy to fly, you would be better off having more experience under your belt with something like the UDI U818A. Initially, I was going to recommend a cheaper quadcopter, but frankly if you’re willing to spend anything in the $400 – $600 range, you’re better off saving up for the Phantom 3. All of the other drones in that price range simply can’t compare to capabilities of DJI’s new Phantom. For starters, this model comes equipped with a camera that can record video in 2.7k HD and take pictures in 12mp. While this is pretty great quality, what really should make you happy is the new f/2.8 lens with a 94⁰field of view. What makes this lens so great is that there is no more unwanted distortion, or in other words no more fisheye effect. This is awesome because not only does the video quality look better, you can also easily upload it online without a ton of boring editing. With the new DJI GO app you can even watch the footage live as you’re flying in 720p. This app can also be used to change your camera settings, perform auto takeoff and landing, edit and share your videos, as well as perform many other impressive tasks. One task that I’ve found to be quite useful is the new interactive flight simulator. This feature is great when first starting out as it allows you to practice flying in a safe virtual environment. While flying the Phantom 3 is honestly fairly easy, you should be warned it’s slightly more complicated to take pictures using the standard model’s remote controller. This is only because DJI left out all the fancy buttons for recording and taking pictures on the standard remote. This leaves you having to do everything on your smart phone or tablet, which can be inefficient if you’re wanting to take professional video or aerial photography. If so, you may want to save up for either the advanced or the professional model.  

 

 

Professional

DJI Phantom 3 Professional quad41 When many people begin flying drones, they dream of the day that they’ll own a Phantom and take rule over the skies. Whether they’ve watched some videos of the Phantom online, or maybe even seen one flown at a concert – they just knew they had to have one. Sadly enough there is a problem that most people end up facing in their conquest of getting the Phantom 3. This worrisome problem is whether to get the standard, advanced, or professional model. Okay, maybe it’s not so big of a problem; but if you’re planning on getting the Phantom 3 then it’s one you’ll have to face. Essentially, the Phantom 3 Advanced and Professional are internally exactly the same. The only notable difference is that the professional model comes with a camera that shoots video in 4k UHD. So, if you’re anything like me and want the best quadcopter possible for aerial imaging, go with the professional model. If you don’t care about the 4k camera though then just go with the advanced. No matter which model you choose, you’ll still get all of the same beneficial features besides the camera. The most important feature having to be the now built-in DJI Lightbridge system. This system effectively increases the range of your live video feed up to 15,000+ feet out while simultaneously connecting you with GLONASS satellite positioning. The extra satellites really help with improving flight stabilization and making sure the drone is where it needs to be at all times. This improved flight stabilization coupled with the 3-axis gimbal results in aerial video footage like you’ve never seen before. If you’re lucky enough to ever get the chance to fly a Phantom 3 Advanced or Professional, one of the first things you’ll notice is a light clicking noise after you turn it on. This clicking is actually known as the Vision Positioning system. DJI implemented the VPS to help with flying close to the ground and indoors without the aid of GPS. Essentially DJI installed an optical camera and ultrasonic sensors that scan the ground underneath the drone when you reach around 10ft off the ground. Even though DJI says the Vision Position technology helps with flying indoors, I still wouldn’t recommend it in close quarter environments. In a large enough room such as a warehouse or concert venue though you should be good to go.  

 

Yuneec Typhoon Q500 4K quad42 Another great drone that is steadily gaining popularity is the Yuneec Typhoon Q500 4K. While I wouldn’t quite compare it to the Phantom 3, it does come with a few benefits that some may prefer. For starters, included with the Yuneec Q500 is their handheld Steadygrip system that holds the CGO3 camera with the 3-axis gimbal. With this device all you have to do is attach your smart phone on top and you now have the ability to record seamlessly smooth 4K UHD footage right from the palm of your hands. This is a great addition for anyone who wants to take footage while on the ground without all the shakiness you would normally expect. This would have been amazing back in my skateboard days.. The next big advantage of the Yuneec Q500 is the ST10+ personal ground station. What’s so nice about this all-in-one controller comes is that it comes with a 5.5 inch Android tablet. This is awesome news because it eliminates the need of having to buy an extra one just to use with your drone. Since the quad itself already cost so much, the built-in tablet is definitely a nice bonus. Another “unique” bonus with the Typhoon Q500 is that you can watch the footage back in slow motion. All you have to do is record the footage in 1080p at a high FPS, then go back after and slow the footage down. This is extremely useful when making some cool videos. When comparing the footage from the Phantom 3 and the Q500 4K though you will notice that the colors from the Phantom are much more vibrant. Also I prefer the 20mm lens on the Phantom as it makes the footage not as blurry around the edges. Though the lens on the CGO3 camera is a little wider so I guess some people may like it better. Where the Typhoon Q500 could really use some help though is in the speed category. While it can reach a top speed of around 40+ mph without GPS, with GPS it can only go around 15mph at most. When you’re used to flying a Phantom 3 which can reach a top speed of around 30+ mph, this can seem a little slow. Since we’re on the topic of speed though I do have to admit that the Yuneec customer service is much better than DJI’s. This alone might just be the biggest reason to go with Yuneec as they’re much more pleasant to deal with if you run into problems. Which in the drone world is highly likely to happen.

 

  DJI Inspire 1 quad43 It’s a bird, it’s a plane, no it’s the most expensive drone on the market – the DJI Inspire 1! Haha, with all jokes aside, if you’re looking to get the best quadcopter that money can buy, short of building your own, then the Inspire 1 is what you want. This drone makes capturing amazing aerial footage more simplistic than ever before. While the camera is essentially the same as the Phantom 3, the Inspire 1 does have a lot of added perks that set the two drones apart. If you’re used to flying the Phantom series, as well as many other quadcopters, then you’re all too familiar with the propellers and landing gear sneaking its way into your footage. It’s so annoying trying to perfectly angle the camera to avoid seeing them, and when they do show up, it usually ruins the video. DJI avoids this with the Inspire 1 by giving it retractable landing gear that moves up while you’re flying. You can either press the auto take off button while you’re on the ground and it will do it for you automatically, or press the transformation button while you’re in the air and it will do it on command. Once the landing gear is finally up though you no longer have to worry about any part of the drone coming into view of the camera. This revolutionary design made it possible for the Inspire 1 to have a camera that can turn and film in 360°. While it may take some skill to fly the drone around and fully utilize the potential of the camera, you could always buy the upgraded package with two controllers and have someone fly or control the camera for you. Having the ability to control the camera while someone else is flying really brings me back to the days of doing airstrike missions on Call of Duty. Besides simply making the flight experience more entertaining, the dual operator feature also makes capturing the perfect footage or picture easier than ever before. For the most part, the Inspire 1 is a lot like the Phantom 3, just improved in many ways. One of the first differences you’ll notice is that the Inspire is much faster than the Phantom. While the Inspire can reach top speeds of up to 45+mph, the Phantom 3 can only go about 35mph. Another advantage the Inspire has is better Vision Positioning technology. This is the technology that allows the DJI drones to fly indoors and without access to GPS satellites. With the Inspire you can actually detect the ground up to a range of 16ft below, which is slightly better than the Phantom 3 at only 10ft. You can also upgrade the camera at any time thanks to the detachable gimbal. This comes really useful if you ever want to change or upgrade your camera, or if you want to use the DJI OSMO. There is one area where the Phantom 3 does outperform the Inspire 1 though and that is in range. Using the Lightbridge technology I can manage to watch the live feed with the Phantom 3 at a range of over 15,000ft. However using the Inspire 1 I can only watch the live feed at a range of over 13,000ft. Though compared to the Yuneec Typhoon Q500 4K which only has a live feed range of about 2,000ft, both DJI quadcopters seem pretty impressive .   Credits: http://bestquadcopterreviews.org