Tagged: rc airsoft tanks

1/16 German Tiger Air Soft Rc Battle Tank Smoke & Sound

 The Tiger tank was possibly the most famous tank of World War 2                       tank14

The German Tiger Tank was introduced in August 1942 and was at that time the most powerful tank in the world. The success of the Tiger was so profound, that no allied tank dared to engage it in open combat. This psychological fear soon became to be known as “Tigerphobia”.                                       tank5

A battalion of Tiger tanks being transported by rail. Their combat tracks can be seen rolled up in front.

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Tigers of sPzAbt.505 taking up positions shortly before commencement of Operation Zitadelle.
Germany was late to join in the race for the development of heavy tanks. By the time of Operation Barbarossa (invasion of Russia), the Russians had possessed the best tanks of its time, both superior in quality and quantity. The Red Army was the only one in the world equipped with heavy tanks (KV-1) and the superior medium tanks (T-34).

Many had noted that the Tiger was conceived after the Germans encountered the Russian T-34 during the campaign on the east . This is not entirely accurate as the planning had already begun at a meeting with Hitler on 26th May, 1941. It was not until June 22nd, 1941 that Operation Barbarossa was launched. However, Hitler’s interest in the project peaked after the Germans encountered the T-34 medium tank which had practically rendered the entire German panzer forces obsolete. This caused the development of the new heavy tank to progress at a feverish rate. Germany wasted no time in catching up in the gun-armor race and was soon to have developed some of the best armored fighting vehicles of world war 2.

Going back further, German heavy tank development can be traced back to 1937 with the German Armaments Ministry issuing a specification for a new heavy tank to Daimler-Benz, Henschel, MAN and Porsche. This project however was ignored as the current Panzer III and IV had so far proved effective tanks and served well in combat. It was not until spring 1941 that the project was revived after Hitler was impressed with heavy allied tanks, such as the French Char B1 and British Matilda 1 during the campaign in the west.

On May 26th May1941, during a Germans armament meeting, Hitler ordered for the creation of heavy Panzers which were to have an increased effectiveness to penetrate enemy tanks; possess heavier armor than was previously achieved; and attain a maximum speed of at least 40km/h. Another condition was the prototype had to be completed and presented to Hitler in time for his birthday on April 20, 1942. These key decisions led to the development of a new heavy tank, the Tiger 1. This project was known as the “Tiger program”.

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Two firms were contracted for the design of the new tank, Porsche of Stuttgart and Henschel and Sohn of Kassel. It’s an interesting note that Porsche is the same firm that today produces the famed Porsche sports car. Both Porsche and Henschel were responsible only for the chassis and automotive design. Turret and main weapon design was awarded to yet another firm, Krupp of Essen.

The first consideration for the Tiger 1 was the selection of a more powerful main gun. The invasion of Russia had shown that the current armament on German tanks were incapable of defeating Russian tanks except at very close ranges. The only effective weapon the German army possessed at that time against the Russian T-34 and KV-2s was the 88mm antiaircraft gun. The 88mm was a versatile weapon capable of serving many roles from anti-aircraft to anti-tank and artillery. By this time, the 88mm had already proven itself as a formidable tank killer, highly accurate and capable of taking out enemy tanks at extreme ranges. Its rise to fame was especially noted in the hands of the Afrika Korps, under the command of Rommel during the African campaign. In fact, during that time, the 88mm was the only weapon the German army possessed that could effectively deal with Russian tanks.

The 88mm was a cumbersome weapon, needing to be towed and deployed in order to be readied for action. As it was, the Tiger 1 was the first tank to mount the 88mm gun in a fully traversable turret. Krupp designed the turret to mount the KwK 36 L/56 88mm anti-tank gun. The designation KwK 36 and L/56 simply implied the model number year 36 and the barrel length of 56 calibers. Depending on the type of ammunition used, the Tiger’s 88mm has a muzzle velocity of 930m per second and could penetrate up to 110mm of armor at a distance of 2000 meters. For comparison’s sake, the T-34’s armor was 90mm at its thickest and this was only on the late T-34 models which possessed armor upgrades. Since the flight time of an armor piercing round at a range of 2000m is about 2.1 seconds, accuracy and correction of fire against moving targets is more important than with older anti tank guns. This made it ideally suited to open terrain where it could engage enemy tanks at long range before the opponent’s weapons were even in range.

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The 88mm Fliegerabwehrkanonen (FLAK) proved very deadly to allied planes and tanks.

 

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Inside view of the 88mm Kwk36 L/56 in a Tiger H1 (E).

 

For the chassis, Henschel and Porsche had produced their own designs. Porsche was more advanced than Henschel as they had independently embarked on a new heavy tank project beginning in the autumn of 1940, even before the official order was given for a new heavy tank. Porsche designed a totally new chassis codenamed VK4501 (P). The codename VK was for Volkettenfahrzeuge or “fully tracked experimental vehicle”, 45 means a 45 ton class and 01 represents the first model. The new VK4501 (P) chassis had 100mm of frontal armor, 80mm side and rear armor, 25mm top armor and 20mm bottom armor. It utilized an advanced power drive train system which used both a combination of petrol and electric to power the tracks. The engine was a two 10 cylinder, 15 litre, air-cooled Porsche Typ 101/1 delivering 320hp at 2400 rpm. These engines did not power the tank’s drive train directly. Instead it was linked to an electric generator which then supplied electricity to two electric motors. These electric motors would then power the drive train.

This concept of an electrically powered tank would have greatly conserved fuel and while technologically advanced, was too new and untested and very prone to breakdowns. Furthermore the electrical system used copper, a vital resource Germany was in short supply of. Weighing in at full combat weight of 59 tons, it could achieve a top speed of 35km/h. Designated Tiger (P) or Tiger P1, the Porsche Tiger had its turret mounted ahead in the front section of the hull.

On September 1941, an order was placed for 100 turrets and hulls for the VK4501 (P). On April 1942, the first prototype of Tiger (P) was completed, in time for a demonstration on Hitler’s birthday. However Tiger (P) encountered serious complications and manufacturing had been suspended many times. On October 1942, the Tiger commission met to evaluate which of the Tiger (P) or Tiger (H) would be selected for mass production.

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Porsche Tiger (P) had its turret mounted upfront.

 

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Porsche Tiger (P)s were converted to Ferdinand Panzerjager Tank Destroyer.

 

Henschel was working on a VK3601 (H) project when the order was received for new heavy tank design on May 1941. The VK3601 (H) was designed to carry the 75mm KwK 42 L/70 tapered bore gun and before the new order was given, Henschel did not intend to mount the 88mm gun. On September 1941, it was then decided that it is not possible to mount an 88mm gun on the VK3601 (H) chassis. Furthermore, Hitler had ordered that the Krupp designed turret for Porsche’s VK4501 (P) chassis with the 88mm KwK L/56 was to be fitted to Henschel’s Tiger. These restrictions left Henschel with no other option but to design a new VK4501 (H) chassis.

Known as Tiger (H), Henschel utilized as much already available components from previous heavy panzer designs. The VK4501 (H) was created by redesigning the hull of the VK3601 chassis. The chassis had 100mm frontal armor, 80mm side superstructure, 60mm side hull, 80mm rear armor and 25mm top and bottom armor. The turret was originally designed by Krupp for Tiger (P), but was modified and used by Tiger (H). For the engine, it utilized a 12 cylinder Maybach HL 210 P45, delivering 650horsepower at 3000rpm. The transmission was an 8 speed Maybach Olvar 40 12 16 designed to provide a maximum speed of 45km/h. As was usual with German tanks during that time, it was equipped with a ball mounted machine gun fitted on the front right side of the hull. Weighing in at full combat weight of 57 tons, Tiger (H) could carry up to 92 rounds of main gun ammunition and up to 5700 rounds of 7.92mm MG34 rounds.

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The first prototype of Tiger (H) was completed on April 1942, in time for a demonstration on Hitler’s birthday. The first Tiger (H) known as Versuchsserie Tiger Nr. V1 was fitted with a new feature called the Vorpanzer, which was a frontal shield which could be lowered to protect the tracks and drive sprocket. This feature was quickly discontinued and having been fitted only on the first Tiger (H).

By July 1942, both Tiger (P) and Tiger (H) were being tested at the firing grounds at Berka, Germany. The Tiger (H) proved superior and was approved for mass production. The production for Tiger (P) was discontinued. Of the original 100 Tiger (P) ordered, only 10 had been assembled by October 1942 (chassis Nr 150001 through 150010). The remaining 90 turrets were converted for mounting with Tiger (H). 90 hulls were converted to the Ferdinand Panzer-Jager (tank destroyer), named after its designer Dr. Ferdinand Porsche. This Panzer-Jager was later renamed to Elephant. Of the 10 assembled Tiger (P), three were converted to Bergefahrzeuge (recovery vehicles), another three were converted to Raumpanzer Tiger (debris clearance vehicle) and the last four were retained for further testing (Nr 150004, 150005, 150013 and 150014). Only one (Nr 150013) saw action as a command tank on the Eastern front.

Production Series

Officially designated Panzerkampfwagen VI Sd.Kfz 181, Tiger Ausf. E, the Tiger tank was the first tank to use animal names by the German army (such as Panther, Tiger, Elephant) as a propaganda tool to draw attention. Production started in July 1942 with the first Tigers delivered in August 1942. There is only one official production version for the Tiger 1, although several modifications had been made as suggested by battle experienced crews. These modifications began to be known as the early, mid and late production Tigers.

The early production Tigers had rather tall commander cupolas which used bullet proof glass as its vision ports. Other visible characteristics were a top opening commander’s hatch, smoke dischargers on the turret sides, rubber rimmed road wheels, dual headlights and Feifel air cleaners. Mid production models saw the replacement of the commander’s cupola which was now shorter and used seven periscopes instead of vision ports. The commander’s hatch now swivels to the side, an MG34 ring mount was added to the turret top for anti-aircraft defense, a gun travel lock at the rear was added and the dual headlights were replaced with a single centrally mounted headlight. The rubber rimmed road wheels were retained but the first outer wheels were often removed due to the muddy and snowy terrain Vimoutiers Tiger
on the Eastern front. Zimmerit was applied from August 1943 onwards. The smoke dischargers, pistol ports on the turret sides and Feifel air cleaners were discontinued. About 470 units of mid production series were produced between July 1943 and January 1944. Late production Tigers are most easily identified as the rubber rimmed road wheels were replaced with steel road wheels. the gun travel lock was discontinued and the gun sight was changed from a binocular TZF9b to a monocular TZF9c.
Despite the overall excellent design, the Tiger tank suffered from mechanical and logistical problems for a tank of its size. It was prone to mechanical breakdowns and needed constant repairs and maintenance to keep it operational. It was at one point forbidden to run the Tiger tank for long extended marches due to the overtaxed drivetrains. Fuel requirements were enormous, a resource which Germany was in short supply of. The massive size of the tank could not fit into the standard rail compartment.

To overcome this, two sets of tracks were needed, one narrower 66cm transportation tracks and a wider 80cm combat tracks. However when properly supported and maintained, it was a superior tank when deployed. It was not slow and un-maneuverable as some had noted. The road speed of the Tiger 1 was 38km/h, a mere 2km/h slower than the Panzer III and IV. The cross country speed equaled the Panzer IV at 20km/h while slightly faster than the Panzer III which was 18km/h.

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Southern Normandy, August 1944, fighting was intense after the American invasion of the Normandy coast. The germans were in constant retreat and were faced with a chronic fuel shortage crisis. A convoy of german tanks, near the town of Vimoutiers were headed to a nearby fuel dump. Many tanks never made it and had to be disabled after exhausting all fuel supplies. This was one of them, belonging to sPzAbt 501, blown up by their own crew to prevent capture. Two charges were placed, one in the turret and one in the engine compartment. It now sits facing west, close to the town of Vimoutiers, France. The outside has been restored and properly painted, but the hatches and all openings are welded shut. The inside is nothing but a mangled steel of rust.

 Credits: http://www.worldwar2aces.com/tiger-tank/

US M1A2 Abrams Air Soft RC Battle Tank

US M1A2 Abrams Air Soft RC Battle Tank- The M1 Abrams main battle tank is the principal combat tank of the United States Army and the United States Marine Corps, with three main versions being deployed starting in 1980: the M1, M1A1, and M1A2. The latest versions of the M1A2 have a new armor and electronics package. It is named after General Creighton Abrams, former Army Chief of Staff and commander of the Army’s 37th Armored Regiment. The M1 Abrams was designed by Chrysler Defense (in 1979, General Dynamics Land Systems Division purchased Chrysler Defense Division) and is currently produced by General Dynamics Corporation in Lima, Ohio, and first entered US Army service in 1980. An improved version of the M1, the M1A1, was introduced in 1985. The M1A1 has the M256 120 mm smoothbore cannon developed by Rheinmetall AG of Germany for the Leopard 2, improved armor, and a CBRN protection system. The M1A2 is a further improvement of the M1A1 with a commander’s thermal viewer and weapon station, position navigation equipment, digital data bus and a radio interface unit.                                                                                                                                                  tank3  1/16 US M1A2 Abrams Air Soft RC Battle Tank Smoke & Sound (Upgrade Version w/ Metal Gear & Tracks). This tank can move forward, accelerating speed forward, backward, accelerating speed backward, rotating, barrel can be raised 30 degree. Turret can turn 320 degree. With this New 2.4Ghz Radio System you can have up New 2.4GHz spectrum technology, with the functions of automatic identification and precise code pairing, strong anti-jamming, and allow more than 20 tanks to run at the same time. This is a 1/16 scale fully custom painted and assembled replica of the US M1A2 Abrams Tank with the long gun barrel featuring radio-controlled of all movement including turret rotation and gun elevation. It features full suspension and a main gun that fires BB pellets up to 25 meters! Excellent value for money and a big improvement on the previous version. A great introduction to large scale radio controlled tanks. Maximum side turning angel of turret (left/right) approximately 320-degree Maximum vertical turning angel of gun (up/down) approximately 30-degree Maximum climbing gradient (changeable on different road surfaces) approximately 35-degree Product size: 56 x 23 x 18cm Function: forward high-speed forward, backward, high-speed backward and spin The barrel moves up and down 30. the turret turns 320 emulation music and action effect Full scale R/C function, supper chassis, Realistic suspension system Full scale R/C function simulative motor start-up sound Engine sound, machine-gun sound Cannonball sound Emulation action effect                              tank2

  • Full scale R/C function simulative motor start-up sound; (Upgrade Version w/ Metal Gear & Tracks)
  • Maximum side turning angel of turret (left/right) approximately 320-degree
  • The barrel moves up and down 30. the turret turns 320 emulation music and action effect
  • Maximum climbing gradient (changeable on different road surfaces) approximately 35-degree
  • With the New 2.4Ghz Radio System, you extend the reach, functionality and handling characteristics. Ready To Run Request (6 AA Batteries for the Controller)

tank1   http://

RC General Buying Decisions

veh1Radio controlled vehicles/craft can be fairly cleanly divided into two categories, toy and hobby-level. The toy type are what most people think of when you mention “RC” — buy-and-drive playthings that you can purchase from a toy or electronics store. These are made strictly for the sake of fun. Then there are the more sophisticated and capable models targeted towards hobbyists who want to go faster, tinker with settings and upgrades, and perhaps participate in one of the many levels of established competitive events. Neither class of RC is necessarily “better” — they each have their positive and negative qualities. However, when you’re first starting out, it’s very worthwhile to choose which way you want to go up front, long before you pull out your credit card. This article presents the most important facts that can help you make an informed decision.                                                                                                                                            

Cost

Toy R/C cars & trucks that you can buy at places like Toys R Us or Walmart start at $20-25 USD, and the most extreme ones top out around $150. Toy R/C planes start at around $30. When you step up to the hobby level, you’ll be hard pressed to find something complete for under $130. It’s very easy to spend $400-500 on a 1/10th scale car or truck that will last awhile, and a fully upgraded rig can easily shoot up to $2,000-3,000 USD.

Speed

In most cases, there’s really no comparison between the performance of toy and hobby-level RCs. Most toy cars & trucks will go anywhere from 5mph to 15mph, with the fastest few doing 20-24mph. Hobby-level RCs generally start at 15-25mph for electrics and 25-35mph for nitro versions. You can get monster trucks that will do over 40mph out of the box, and low-slung street cars that will do over 60 with no upgrades or modifications. In planes, the toys generally go around 5-15mph, while there are hobby-class craft that will do 30, 50, even 80mph in factory stock form. The most extreme speed differences are in boats. The toys often putt and crawl along at 1-5mph, while the hottest hobby-level racing boats will skim the surface at over 100mph

Durability

Mostly because they’re slow, toy RCs tend to handle more abuse than their more expensive cousins. The most common things to break are bumpers and body trim. The land and water-borne vehicles are built with a lot more material than is necessary, while aircraft tend to be constructed of foam and flexible plastics that bounce back after being bent. However…

When they break…

Repairing a toy RC is sometimes not worth the time & effort. Nearly all use multifunction circuit boards that combine several major functions, so if something goes electrically wrong, you have to change out the whole thing. Most manufacturers don’t have a factory service program, so you have to do the work yourself. Many don’t even offer a way to order new parts. Nikko is a notable exception. You can call them, tell them exactly what vehicle you have, describe the problem, and order precisely the part(s) you need. Many RC’s available at Radio Shack are actually from Nikko and are covered by this same level of support, with the additional convenience of being able to go back to the store and special-order your parts in person.

Fixing hobby-level RCs is, in most cases, a completely different affair. You can disassemble anything yourself. With most popular brands there are manuals and exploded views. There are service departments that handle returns of defective components. Electronics are, with rare exception, separated by function so that you don’t have to change your speed controller if your radio receiver crystal goes bad. Parts are available at brick-and-mortar hobby shops and dozens of trusted, popular web sites. There are online forums (message boards) where you can ask other hobbyists for advice and learn from their experience. veh2

Upgradability

These days, ever more toy RCs have upgrades available for purchase from the original manufacturer, particularly amongst the smaller “micro” cars and trucks. These upgrades can range from different body kits to stickier tires to faster motors. They’re generally very easy to install, requiring at most a small screwdriver (which is often included) and 15 minutes, and can dramatically change the look or performance of the vehicle. They’re also great fun to install and let the owner add a bit of their own personality.

The most popular hobby RCs may have literally hundreds of upgrades available from many different aftermarket sources (companies other than the original manufacturer). Among the available upgrades may be anything from scale-realistic wheels to anodized aluminum struts in various colors to larger motors/engines to total conversion kits that fundamentally change the vehicle. Many hobby-level RC parts are reusable from one vehicle to another, especially electronic components and motors/engines. Popular RC models come with the support of other owners nationwide or around the world who share their experiences, tips, and home-grown modifications freely on the Internet.

Controllability

Toy radio systems traditionally give you forward/reverse (or up/down) and left/right direction control. A growing number of cars & trucks these days now have “digital proportional” steering to boot, which gives you a number of steps between neutral and full turning, depending upon how far you turn the wheel or push the stick on the radio transmitter. Some, though, only let you go straight forward or to turn one pre-set direction in reverse. Toy helicopters are what you have to watch out for the most, as these sometimes give you only one axis of control — go straight up, or come straight down. Most toy RC’s are still only available on two frequencies (e.g., 27mhz and 49mhz in the US), with a few now offering 3 to 6 possibilities. This limits the number of vehicles that can run at one time, but more unfortunately it reduces the possibility of even being able to run two random vehicles together.

Hobby-class radio systems give you 64 to 256 (or more) steps of control in each direction for what feels like perfectly smooth turning & throttle control. These systems can also be easily changed between anywhere from 6 to 30 different frequencies, so even if the one person you want to race against or fly with has an absolutely identical radio setup, for around $20 and with a one-minute part swap, you’re both in the clear. Still better, the most recent generation of radio systems, while expensive, operate on an extremely high frequency and use small computer chips to automatically search for and lock onto an open channel, ensuring that you’ll never have a frequency conflict.

Raceability

Toy RCs can be raced between siblings or friends around the neighborhood, but there’s generally no sanctioned racing. Hobby-level RCs are raced around the world in local, regional, national, and even international events, even including multi-track tours.

Ownership

When all is said and done, the purchase decision between toy & hobby-level RCs should always come down to who the purchase is being made for. You don’t want to buy a $390, 45mph nitro-powered car for a 6-year-old. Likewise, a 16-year-old who wants to get into RC racing for sport wouldn’t be well-served by a $39 toy. What’s really interesting is the 26-year-old with a $25 micro-sized monster truck who would derive hours of fun from chasing his/her cat around the kitchen floor or gingerly driving around a makeshift desktop obstacle course during lunchtime at work. Before you buy an RC, know who you’re buying it for and do a little research. That extra time spent up front could make the difference between tremendous fun and awkward disappointment. Credits: http://www.beginningrc.com/ http://

RC Tank Wars

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