Tagged: RC Cars/Trucks

RC Cars Suspension Tuning

– Basic Suspension Tuning –

With Mark Pavidis suspension1http:// Mark Pavidis is old school. He’s been making A-mains at big races since some of today’s younger pro racers were in diapers. He has raced for some of the biggest companies in our industry, and has helped developed some of the most influential chassis, tire, and component designs in the RC world. Mark has been competitive at the top levels of RC racing longer than anyone from any part of the world, and many racers from any generation regard him as one of the toughest competitors they’ve ever faced.

He has won U.S. National championships in several classes, including 1/8-Scale Buggy. Along with Japanese legend Masami Hirosaka, Mark is the only other driver to win IFMAR World titles in both on-road and off-road competition. Unlike Masami, or any other driver, Mark is the only driver ever to win IFMAR World championships in both electric and nitro competitions. His 2006 IFMAR 1/8-Scale Off-Road title reaffirmed his place in RC history as one of the best racers of all time.

I sat down with Mark at AKA’s new offices in Murrieta, California, to discuss the most common adjustments available on today’s nitro buggies. When Mark Pavidis talks buggy setup, we listen.  suspension2  CAMBER
Camber is the relationship of the tire to the ground, such that a tire that is perpendicular to the racing surface has zero camber. If the top of the tire leans in toward the car, it has negative camber; likewise, a tire that leans outward at the top has positive camber.

Front Camber. Adding more negative camber to the front of your buggy will make your car less aggressive, especially when turning into the corner. More negative camber will also lessen the chances that the front tires will catch on ruts or bumps. Mark says, “On rough or high speed tracks, adding more negative camber is an important adjustment to make.” It’s usually best to start with a little bit of negative camber in the front.

Taking away negative camber (or even adding positive camber) to the front of your buggy takes away a little bit of overall steering, but will make your buggy steer into the corner more aggressively since the corner of the tire will dig into the track’s surface. This can help on slower tracks with plenty of high-speed corners.

Rear Camber. More negative camber in the rear tires will free up the rear of the car, making it whip around by taking away lateral traction. As with the front of the car, more negative camber will help your buggy navigate through rough sections of the track.

Running less negative camber in the rear will take away a little bit of overall steering, but your buggy will handle more responsively. If the track is not bumpy and has good traction, try running less negative camber to help carry more speed through corners.     suspension3 CAMBER LINK POSITIONS
The optional camber link mounting holes alter the rate at which the camber angle changes throughout the suspension’s movement. For the purposes of making only the following changes, you should reset your camber angles after moving the camber link locations.

Front
Outside (on the front hub).
A longer link means the camber will change less as the suspension compresses, which will make the car turn in harder but push exiting the corner.
Moving to the inside hole will give more camber rise, which smooths out initial turn-in but adds steering through the middle and exit of the corner.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Raising the inner mount will keep the front end more flat. On high bite and smooth track, this will smooth out your car’s steering response and make it easier to drive.
Lowering the inner mount will add body roll and make the car more aggressive. Mark almost always runs the lowest hole available.

Rear
Outside (on the rear hub).
A longer link gives less camber rise, which means less traction. On a high speed track with high grip, this will add more support by eliminating body roll.
A shorter link equals more camber rise and more traction. Because a shorter link will make the rear of the car feel softer, it will better handle rough sections of the track.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Moving the inner camber link mount to the inside or outside hole will have the same effect as changing the length of the link on the hub.
Raising the link on the rear shock tower will keep the buggy flat through corners and have less camber rise; this is a good adjustment to make on a smooth track with high traction.
Lowering the link will add camber rise and make the car more forgiving when the track is rough.
Moving the link out on both the shock tower and the hub, which will keep the camber link the same length, will add support and make the rear of the car feel stiffer. suspension4

TOE-IN / TOE-OUT
This is the angle of the tires when compared to the centerline of the car. A tire that has zero toe is pointing straight ahead. Toe-in means that the tires point in toward each other, while toe-out is the opposite.

Front Toe
1/8-Scale Buggies almost always run toe-out in the front. Adding more toe-out will make the car smoother and easier to drive on big tracks, as well as increase low-speed steering by decreasing the car’s turning radius.
Likewise, decreasing toe-out (even to the point of running zero toe) will give the car more initial steering response. This is usually only done on tight, low-speed tracks.
Mark says, “If you run toe-in (at the front), your car won’t come out of the corner very well, and initial turn-in will be too darty. If you run toe-out, it will turn in and come out of the corner much smoother.”

Rear Toe
The rear of the car is much different, as toe-out is never used. Adding more rear toe-in will add overall rear traction, both in a straight line and during cornering.
On the flip side, less toe-in will increase steering since the rear tires will have less traction. Also, the rear suspension and driveshafts will be at less of an angle, which will help on rough sections of the track.
Mark says, “Nine times out of ten, I run maximum rear toe-in (on the Kyosho MP9, this is three degrees of toe-in per side). The only time I run less is in truggy, because there’s already so much grip.” Also, he suggests only changing the inner pivot blocks to adjust toe-in rather than using rear hubs with different angles of toe-in. Changing the rear hubs will increase the angle of the driveshaft joint and change how the car works. suspension5KICK-UP
Kick-up is the angle between the ground and the lower inner hinge pins on which the suspension arms swing. Altering kick-up will affect the car much like caster does. In addition, adding kick-up will make your bump higher and further. You should only consider decreasing kick-up when the track has few or no jumps. suspension6

SHOCK POSITION
Tower. Moving the shock in on the tower will make the shock feel more progressive i.e.; initially it will feel softer, but increasing in stiffness as the shock compresses. If the track is slippery, move the shock in on the tower to add body roll and overall traction.
Moving the shock outward will make the shock feel more linear. This will free up the car and make it jump much better. On a track with lots of grip, move your shocks out on the tower to reduce body roll.

Arm. Moving to a more inward shock location on the arm will make the buggy feel softer and less stable. For blown out tracks, this adjustment will help navigate bumps and ruts without hurting the car’s jumping performance as much as moving the shock inward on the tower.
An outer shock position on the arm will make the car rotate more during cornering, and make the buggy feel more stable. This comes at the expense of rough track performance.

SHOCKS
Shock Oil. Thicker shock oil will help the car to navigate larger jumps and bumps since the oil will slow the reaction of the shock. In hot weather, increase the weight of your shock oil to maintain the same damping characteristics.
Thinner shock oil will allow the shock to react more quickly, and help your buggy soak up smaller bumps and track imperfections. If your buggy works well in warm weather, switch to thinner shock oil in very cold conditions.
Mark explains, “Temperature is a huge part of choosing shock oil.”

Shock Pistons. Choosing the correct shock pistons is quite simple. On smooth tracks with big jumps, Mark suggests using smaller pistons to slow down the shock action. On rough tracks with fewer jumps, reach for pistons with larger holes to allow the shock to soak up the ruts.

Shock Springs. Mark doesn’t often change his shock springs to adjust his car. In fact, he suggests changing both the front and rear springs at the same time to maintain the same balance front to rear. If the track surface is slippery, go to lighter springs to create more body roll and slow the car’s reactions. On asphalt, grass or Astroturf tracks with tons of grip, use heavier springs at both ends of the car to resist traction rolling.

CONCLUSION
As you’ll notice, each adjustment sacrifices a particular handling trait to gain another. There’s no magic adjustment to make your car “super dialed”, so decide what your buggy needs to do differently, make changes to your car, and see if your lap times improve. This guide should serve as a perfect compliment to the most useful tool you’ll ever find in your RC career: practice.

                                                                                                                                                               

Source:

http:// Remote Control Toys on Sale

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

I’m so glad I decided to go to the Hobby Garage in Kuki the other day. Had I not, I don’t think I would have ever understood what “custom” really means to RC car enthusiasts in Japan. If you thought what you saw in yesterday’s post was impressive, well all I can say is scroll down and be further surprised…I sure was once I had the chance to go through every car entered in the contest!

Check out this S13 body. So many cool details like the ground-scarping front lip spoiler, plenty of negative camber and the model-car equivalent of rolled fenders. It’s all about the tuck!

Next to it was this camo Onevia running even more camber, “bolted on” overfenders…

…and a pink engine. Despite only having 4-ignition leads and four intake runners on the plenum it did look more like an RB than an SR!

I guess if you want to place high at these sort of competitions, you really have to push your imagination and think outside the box. This beaten up S15 reminded me of what some of those crazy drifters end up doing to their cars at events like the Drift Matsuri in Ebisu Circuit.

Looks like it took some pretty big hits and a few excursions into the mud, but at least it’s still straight enough to drift!

We saw a little teaser image of this Toyota Estima minivan yesterday. Aside from the fact that it’s already quite cool that you can get these sort of bodies for 1/10th scale chassis…

…it obviously doesn’t stop owners taking them to the next level. This is probably inspired by those vans that show up at Daikoku PA on a Saturday night and blast out ridiculously loud music.

It even had a fully decked out trunk with big subwoofers and a functioning LCD screen. There were two smaller additional screens on either side of the van too. A constant power supply kept the mini-screens functioning and the music playing.

And if you think that’s wild take a look at this Subaru BRZ. This fully functional drift car was equipped with all sorts of cool touches…

…like the custom turbo boxer engine, angel eyes in the headlights….

…but most incredible of all was the custom drop top conversion. It took the owner eight months of hard work to design and build the mechanical servo-actuated roof and trunk! A second remote control is needed to actuate the opening and closing of the roof, trunk and hood.

But no matter how simple or complex the cars may be, each have their own appeal.

This “Arctic version” 180SX is one I really liked. The idea alone was so bizarre but so cool at the same time it was probably the one that made me smile the most.

And of course the details are painstakingly realistic!

Nomuken in the house! Well not really as he’s driving an 86 nowadays, but you know what I mean…

Not sure what the inspiration for this 86 was, it certainly does share some similarities with Orido’s D1 car but is seriously beefed up in the fender department.

Our very own Mad Mike should be very happy to see this particular FD!

Any DTM fans out there? Then this Alfa Romeo 155 V6 Ti inspired build…

…will be right down your street.

The Volklinger S14 we saw last year at Hellaflush Kansai and Slammed Society events had inspired lots of other military-themed cars, including scaled ones too of course.

There were a good couple of hours for us all to take closer look of the cars present and submit our votes.

Towards the end of the video presentation of the cars there was one last-minute addition…from me!

In the hope that I would get some time after the event to drift, I brought my brand new RTR-X Mustang from HPI that arrived the other day from the US. I thought it would be a great chance to break her in at a pro Japanese track and once the organizers heard I had a car of my own they let me add it to the line up.

So it got its own video presentation! Some of the guys there seemed to like the eight velocity stacks sticking out of the hood as well as the color matched wheels. It was a great moment; I almost felt accepted, like I was one of them. Unfortunately they all knew it was  completely stock and I hadn’t even turned a screw on it so I dropped the act and continued taking pictures.

Not before I had time to waste one battery though…we all need breaks right!

The owner of this Countach probably thought it would be a sacrilege to have a Lambo and not have the scissor doors open. So he fixed that, and you can now open and close them at the flick of a switch. He was even drifting it with the doors up…letting all the haters hate. That’s right!

Here is another Drift Matsuri missile special. It takes some real skills to make this sort of carnage look realistic…

…all the way down to the rust sport and the shattered glass.

You kyusha fans out there will love this S30 Fairlady Z. As the owner showed me on his phone, Linhbergh’s feature on “that 240Z” was the inspiration.

Pretty damn cool right?

After having shot each entrant’s car in detail I took a wonder over to the track side of the Hobby Garage, where things were very busy with lots of drifting, charging, fine tuning.

It’s there that I spotted even more cool builds, and it seems that most of the guys that were part of the Custom Body Contest had also brought…

…one or is some cases two or more other chassis and bodies to play with.

It’s almost unheard of to see anyone use a stock controller to drift cars at the track. Everyone sports the latest and most expensive commanders, usually just as accessorized as the cars and chassis themselves with carbon-look wraps and replacement steering “wheels.”

Some other cool cars I spotted on track were this pair of Toyotas, this MotorFIX-inspired Corolla…

…and this widebody slammed KP61 Starlet.

Later on in the afternoon it was time for the prizes to be handed out. The organizers of the event at the Hobby Garage had come up with a novel way of eliminating the finalists that didn’t make it to the top spot in the three different categories. If not unanimously voted the best, it was simply flushed down and dropped through a remote-operated trap door! (don’t worry there were a couple of pillows to cushion the fall)

The camo Onevia took the win in the S-chassis group…

…while the shakotan Z grabbed the top spot in the miscellaneous category.

Long and hard work obviously paid off as the top prize in the custom category went to the drop-top BRZ.

After the award ceremony everyone was invited to the main track…

…to join in a few slow parade laps…which quickly turned into a bit of hard drift session!

What a great Sunday out this turned out to be. It was the perfect example of how many different ways enthusiasts, or otakus in this case (!), can enjoy their passion for cars. http://Remote Control Toys on Sale                                                               Credits:    http://www.speedhunters.com/  http://

How to Get Started in Hobby RC: Body Painting Your Vehicles

One of the best ways to personalize an RC kit is to give it a fresh coat of paint. This guide will focus on the basics of painting bodies for RC cars–a genuinely fun and rewarding art form.   

We’ve run through the basics of several types of remote controlled vehicles, from cars to boats to planes–and some tweaks to modify them. But one of the best ways to personalize an RC kit is to give it a fresh coat of paint. This guide will focus on the basics of painting bodies for RC cars–a genuinely fun and rewarding art form.

Most RC car bodies are made from polycarbonate plastic (aka Lexan). It is incredibly tough stuff, which makes it ideal for absorbing the abuse that RC cars are routinely subjected to. The bodies are formed by vacuforming a sheet of clear Lexan over a mold. The body is then painted on the inside surface, which effectively makes the plastic a thick, shiny clear coat. If painted correctly, a body can last and look good for a long time. http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

The Caveats

If you are an accomplished airbrush or spray paint graffiti artist, you already possess many of the skills necessary to paint a RC car body. There are, however, a few elements that are specific to painting car bodies that you must consider. The number one thing to know is that most paints will not stick to Lexan. You must use specially formulated products that are typically sold in hobby shops as RC car body paint. This isn’t a marketing gimmick. These are truly the only paints I have seen that bond reliably to Lexan. If you use some random hardware store paint, it will only look good until that first crash. Then, the paint will begin to chip and flake off, randomly eroding your artistic efforts. Trust me; don’t get cheap with the paint. Buy the right stuff and have no regrets.

Since we will be painting the inside of the body, some things may be reversed from painting tasks you are used to. Obviously, any masking must be done as a mirror image. Less obvious is the need to apply the darkest colors first. Since it is difficult to achieve a fully opaque finish, having a dark color behind a light color may affect the tint of the light color. Applying the dark color first negates this effect. Keep this in mind as you plan out your paint scheme and order of operations.

WORKING WITH LEXAN REQUIRES SPECIAL PAINT AS WELL AS SPECIFIC TOOLS TO ACHIEVE CLEAN, LONG-LASTING RESULTS. A VARIETY OF COMMON MASKING OPTIONS CAN BE USED.

You may need to do trimming or drilling of the car body. I highly recommend using tools designed for the job. The curved blades on Lexan scissors make it easy to trim wheel wells and other rounded areas without creating jagged edges on the body. A tapered reamer is the only sensible way to drill holes in Lexan. Regular drill bits will grab and tear as they go through, often leaving a mess. . If you are using a body that will require cutting and drilling, it is usually better to do this before painting. It helps to have the body clear when you are trying to get everything aligned and fitted.

Your Options

There is a seemingly endless selection of Lexan bodies. Manufacturers will often offer replacement bodies for the vehicles in their lineup. Aftermarket companies also sell a range of bodies in many different styles. Some are designed for a specific vehicle, others are more generic and can be adapted to whatever RC car you please.

In addition to styles, RC car bodies also differ in their level of finish. Some are fully trimmed and have holes drilled for the body posts. Many others must be cut free from the vacuformed sheet and have holes drilled; hence the scissor and reamer suggestion above. The package may also include precut paint masks for the windows or perhaps decals to emulate headlights. Pay attention to these details as you search for a body, as they could have significant impact on the level of effort it takes to get the body painted and fitted to your car.  http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

LEXAN CAR BODIES ARE STOUT STUFF. THIS GARAGE-SALE TREASURE HAS SEEN MUCH ABUSE BUT ITS ONLY PROBLEMS ARE COSMETIC. I REPLACED THE BODY ANYWAY.

Project Example

My brother-in-law recently gave me a Traxxas E-Maxx monster truck that he found at a garage sale for just $15. He’s always had a knack for finding super deals like that. Other than the missing transmitter, the E-Maxx appeared to be complete and in relatively good condition. Thanks Dan!

Since I planned to replace the haggard shell on the E-Maxx anyway, I thought that it presented a good opportunity to illustrate the basic techniques of painting a Lexan body. I actually bought two bodies. On one, I will show a very basic, single-color spray can paint job. With the other body, I will illustrate a more complex multi-color motif that necessitates an airbrush.

THIS REPLACEMENT BODY FOR THE TRAXXAS E-MAXX COMES TRIMMED AND DRILLED TO FIT THE TRUCK. IT ALSO INCLUDES A TRANSPARENT OUTER MASK. ALL OF THESE FEATURES EXPEDITE THE PAINTING AND FITTING PROCESSES.

The bodies that I purchased are Traxxas’ replacement units for the E-Maxx. They are trimmed and drilled for the truck, so that was a big time saver. What I like most about these bodies is that they have a transparent mask on the outside. This prevents paint overspray from getting on the outer part of the body. It is easy enough to mask the outside yourself, but having a transparent mask means you don’t have to remove it every time you want to see how the body looks from the outer surface.

The Spray Can Approach

I did a quick fit check to make sure the body fit the truck as intended (it did) and then got down to business. As with any paint job, the key to a good finish is proper surface preparation. In this case, the body must be washed to remove any dirt, oil, fingerprints, etc. I use a tiny drop of dish soap and warm water to wash the inside surface by rubbing it with a clean wet cloth. After rinsing, I used lint-free paper towels to get everything completely dry.

Next I masked the windows. There are many ways to mask an area for painting. I typically prefer to use regular low-tack masking tape whenever I can. The blue household stuff is good for masking large areas and that’s what I used for the windows. Liquid mask is good for compound curves and complex designs. For stripes or small areas, thin vinyl masking tape works very well. You can also use frisket film, which is a little like adhesive shelf paper. I used a variety of these masks on the airbrushed body, which I will explain later on.

A SHARP KNIFE AND A LIGHT TOUCH ARE ALL YOU NEED TO TRIM MASKING TAPE. ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE FINISHED EDGES ARE FIRMLY ADHERED TO THE LEXAN.

Allow me to digress a bit further on the tape topic. One of my biggest pet peeves is when people set tape rolls down on their side. When that occurs, whatever dirt, dust, hair or other schmutz happened to be on that surface is now stuck to the edge of the tape. When you apply the tape as a mask, the clingons come with it and compromise the edge seal. The result is often color bleeding on your painted edges. To mitigate this, I keep a few generic-use rolls of masking tape handy and visible to the rest of the household while keeping my private stash of clean tape squirreled away in a Ziploc bag. I had to use the community tape for the windows, but it worked out okay.

The windows are marked with small ridges in the plastic. I applied adequate tape to completely cover the area and then trimmed away the excess. I used an X-Acto knife with a new #11 blade for trimming. It takes a very light touch to cut through the tape and not dig into the plastic. The window ridge creates a natural guide for cutting. Once the cut was complete, I carefully peeled away the excess tape. I then used a fingernail to reseal the entire perimeter of the mask.

THE FIRST COAT OF ANY COLOR SHOULD BE A VERY LIGHT MIST TO HELP SEAL THE EDGES OF THE MASKING MATERIAL AND ENSURE A DRIP-FREE FINISH.

The paints I used are from the new Duratrax line of RC car paints. On this first body, I used the Metallic Red spray paint. I always start with a super-light mist coat of paint. This helps to seal the edges of the masks and prevent bleeding. Not all spray cans work the same. It helps to practice a little on a scrap piece of plastic or cardboard first, so you can get a feel for the spray characteristics of the nozzle.

The mist coat dried within a few minutes, so I began applying subsequent coats, each only a little heavier than the mist coat. There’s no point in getting in a hurry and glopping on a heavy coat. It is likely to run and will take longer to dry. After about half an hour and four coats of paint, the body had a nice, even, red tint to it, so I moved on to the next step.

Most metallic, pearl, and candy, and fluorescent colors are not intended to be used alone. They must be backed with a coat of silver or white to make them opaque. In this case, I applied two coats of white Base Cover Coat. This really made the color come alive. I then carefully peeled off the window and outer body masks. However I wasn’t quite done yet.

I LIKE TO RUN A SHARPIE MARKER AROUND WINDOW BORDERS TO HELP HIDE ANY IRREGULARITIES IN THE MASKED EDGE.

I like to trace the perimeter of the window using a black Sharpie marker on the outside of the body. This helps to cover any irregularities in the edge of your mask, of which I had plenty. You can remove any goof-ups with the Sharpie by using a rag and alcohol (denatured alcohol works best). It was at this point that I noticed the bodies did not include headlight decals–that’s a separate item. I guess I’ll have to add them later. The same decal sheet also includes black decals for the windows. If you decide to use something like that, you wouldn’t need to do any masking. Just paint the body and apply the decals to the outside.  http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

THE PAINTED BODY ONLY NEEDS HEADLIGHT DECALS TO BE COMPLETE. I EXPECT THIS PAINT JOB TO WITHSTAND A LOT OF ABUSE AND LOOK GOOD FOR A LONG TIME.

After allowing the paint to dry overnight, I completed the final step of the paint job. I applied squares of masking tape on the underside of the body around the body post holes. This prevents the top of the body posts from scratching the paint each time you install the body. While it isn’t fancy, this red paint job is clean and should last for a long time.

The Airbrush Approach

The advantage of using an airbrush is that it allows much more precise control than a spray can over the amount of paint that comes out and the size of the spray pattern. This precision opens up many possibilities for custom designs and effects. My meager airbrushing abilities only scratch the surface of what is possible. With the second E-Maxx body, I created a paint scheme that is simple by airbrush standards. Yet, it displays some of the subtleties that are possible. My goal here is not to teach you how to use an airbrush, but rather to help you to see why you should learn.

WHEN USING AN AIRBRUSH TO PAINT SMALL AREAS, IT IS IMPORTANT TO MASK ANY PARTS THAT YOU DO NOT WANT PAINTED.

I used frisket film to create the Tested “T” logo on the hood. I first cut out the entire logo design on my workbench (as a mirror image) and then applied the completed mask to the hood. To help me align the mask, I drew reference marks on the outside body mask with a Sharpie. Next I masked off the orange, black, and white stripes that dissect the body. These were created freehand using flexible masking tape, also from Duratrax. This stuff is really flexible (like electrical tape), but doesn’t leave adhesive residue. It takes a little practice, but you can get this tape to fit around compound curves and features in the body relatively easily.

Once the features were masked, I used newspaper to mask most of the body. I left only the soon-to-be black stripes and “T” open. Remember: darkest colors first. I used spray paint for that quick job. Next came Candy Blue for the front of the truck. First, I custom mixed a darker shade of blue by mixing in a little black paint. I then added thinner to get the paint to the right consistency for airbrushing. I applied this darker color to create a fade where the blue meets the forward orange stripe. I also added light touches of this color around the window frames and the T logo to give each a little depth.

Next, I thinned straight Candy Blue from the bottle and applied several coats. As with the red on the previous body, this color also needs an undercoat. This time, I used silver, which I think gives a more metallic finish.  http://amzn.to/22rOrBO

I made a grey color by mixing white and black. This was applied behind the rear orange stripe. It transitions to a lighter grey, and then to white. Somewhere while doing this fade work, I added a shot of grey to the bottom panel of the T logo.

The Fluorescent Orange was airbrushed next. It required a white undercoat. I was able to kill two birds with one stone by painting the white areas and undercoating the orange in one shot. Once the white dried, I traced the window outlines with a Sharpie and called it done. Again, it isn’t a very complex paint job, but it should give you an idea of the effects that are possible with the control afforded by an airbrush.

THE COLOR FADES AND HIGHLIGHTS ON THIS BODY ILLUSTRATE SOME OF THE SIMPLE EFFECTS THAT ARE POSSIBLE WITH AN AIRBRUSH. MANY MORE EXOTIC POSSIBILITIES ABOUND.

Conclusion

I hope these tips will encourage you to try painting your next RC car body. I think it is a lot of fun to do and the creative possibilities are endless. Life is too short for production line paint jobs!

Let’s summarize the key points to remember:

  • Paint goes on the inside surface
  • Wash the body with dish soap
  • Use the proper paint and tools
  • Apply dark colors first
  • Always start with a mist coat on every new color
  • Never use a heavy coat of paint
  • Some colors require a white or silver undercoat
  • Be creative!

Credits:  TERRY DUNN   http://www.tested.com/tech/  http://

Learn Facts About Electric RC Cars

Electric RC cars are the most popular types of RC cars today. This might be because of the fact that every RC car hobbyist begins with this type of vehicle. The operation of an electric RC car is simple enough to be understood even by children. This makes it ideal for the beginner RC car enthusiast.

Electric RC cars have a lot of advantages. These advantages are what make them appealing to the general public. RC cars, which started as toys, have now become accepted as hobby items for adults. Here are some advantages of electric RC cars:

1) Ease of use- as said before, electric RC cars are very simple machines to operate. This is the reason why many parents opt to buy these vehicles for their children during Christmas. Unlike Nitro RC cars which require some complicated procedures in order to ensure correct operation, electric RC cars only require you to put on the batteries and you’re off!

This can be very important especially because of the fact that most people who buy electric RC cars are beginners in the hobby. It is often the fact that people who buy electric RC cars are buying their very first RC car kit. Although very few actually go on to become serious RC car hobbyists, the electric RC car can introduce them to the concept that RC car racing is fun.

2) Cheaper- Electric RC cars generally cost less than their gas-powered counterparts. This is the reason why they are more accessible to the general public. Electric RC cars can come as pre-assembled toys or can be bought in kits. Either way, electric RC cars can cost you so much less than Nitro models.

Economics can be very important to many people when they are looking for items to acquire. Let’s face it: not all of us can afford everything that we want in life. Some people go for electric RC cars because they provide a much more economical alternative to gas-powered ones.

They are also cheaper in terms of fuel. Contrary to popular belief, gas powered RC cars cannot be fueled with gasoline. The fuel that is used in nitro RC cars is a mixture of Nitromethane and castor oil which can be bought at various specialty shops. Electric RC cars, on the other hand, only need batteries or the regular recharge in order to run. This means that you don’t have to spend additional cash on fuel.

3) Indoor use- People are attracted to electric RC cars mainly because of the fact that it can be used indoors. This means that people are able to make use of their RC cars even if outdoor conditions are unfavorable.

What makes electric RC cars so different from Nitro RC cars? Well, it is a combination of two factors:

1) Noise- Electric RC cars run quietly. This makes them ideal for usage indoors. Nitro RC cars rely on combustion to run, which means that they can make a lot of noise. This is especially true if someone tried to operate a Nitro RC car indoors. The sound would reverberate off the walls and cause quite a racket.

2) Smoke- Since Electricity produces clean energy, there are no undesirable byproducts of running an electric RC car. However, electric RC cars need to be charged regularly which means that you might not be able to enjoy them for as long a time as you would enjoy a Nitro RC car.  Credits:

suegold

2015-New-Design                                   http://amzn.to/1IpBPPE                               http://

Axial AX90050 Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® 1/10 Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

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Published on Oct 9, 2015

The Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® RTR is THE ONE that Axial has been working towards for a long time! We’ve always wanted to build a Trophy Truck®, but we first had to build a successful platform. For authenticity, it had to be solid rear axle versus the commonly accepted independent suspension all the way around. Some would consider this “going backwards.” But Axial didn’t just accept what the establishment said was the only way, we wanted true scale looks with the functionality to match. When we delivered the Yeti™ Rock Racer with its IFS front end and solid rear axle, we knew then we had the key ingredients to deliver the vehicle of our dreams – our very own solid rear axle trophy truck! And to top it off we went straight to Roger Norman, CEO/President of SCORE® International, for his blessing and for official licensing.

SCORE® International, the premier world championship desert racing association, was founded in 1973 by the legendary Mickey Thompson. This race organization is home to the world famous Baja 1000 and Baja 500 events. If you live in Southern California, chances are you have seen the iconic red, white and blue SCORE® decals adorning off road vehicles all over the place. This desert racing series was the early inspiration for short course racing events, as organizers tried to bring desert racing to the masses in confined spaces. That’s right, short course off road racing was born in the desert. In true Axial style, we brought you a new R/C vehicle replicating desert racing’s top level competition vehicles, the SCORE® Trophy Truck®.

Axial didn’t stop there. We partnered with the top companies actively developing their products through desert racing to take authenticity to the next level. The Axial SCORE® Trophy Truck® is suspended by a set of aluminum King Shocks rocking the iconic blue shock caps, rod ends, ride height adjusters and springs. King Shocks is a company who has all but dominated the sport through the years providing the latest technology known to man to conquer the harsh terrain of Baja.

Axial also partnered with BFGoodrich® to bring you accurate replicas of the latest spec desert racing tire, the Baja T/A® KR2. This tire has already produced wins at both the Baja 1000 and the grueling King of the Hammers events. A set of five functional BFGoodrich® tires mounted to the extremely strong 105 Method Race wheels provide the connection to dirt. The fifth wheel and tire being a functional spare accessed quickly from the rear of the Trophy Truck® cage.

The other partners on this vehicle are names synonymous with success in the desert:

Rigid Industries – The best lighting available for pitch black night racing in Baja
Lowrance – GPS units to help keep you on course in extremely dusty conditions
Fuel Safe – Custom fuel bladders for the aluminum fuel cells on board.
Pro Am Racing products – Spindles, hubs, brakes and power steering racks
Magnaflow – Exhaust systems for maximum performance and mean sound
PCI Race Radios – Communication between driver, co-driver, chase vehicles and pits
Rancho Drivetrain Engineering – Bullet proof transmissions
Sparco – Safety equipment, and the best molded seats in the business.                                                              Credits: http://www.axialracing.com/products/ax90050                                                                                    http:// http://