Tagged: RC Helicopter

Large Scale Helicopters In Action

copter42

Published on Jun 21, 2015

Awesome scale flying from this pilot of his monster Vario 1/4 scale EC 135 Heli and nearly ended in disaster when on the final approach it clipped the ring used by foamy pilots to fly through in a different flying slot!
2.4 metres long approx
2.3 metre rotor span
Weight about 24 to 26 Kg

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copter41Published on Jun 19, 2016

Model: EC-135 ADAC Notarzt Christoph 33
Engine: Jakadofsky Pro Turbine
Take-off weight: 49Kg
Rotor diameter: 3,50m
Pilot: Michael
Flight Style: Scale
Meeting: Modellflugtreffen in Damelang Germany June 2016

copter43

Published on Jun 18, 2016

Model: CH-113 Boeing Vertol Labrador Tandem Helicopter
Rotor diameter: 2x 2,20m
Lenght: 2,25m
Take-off weight: 22,6Kg
Motor: Kontronik Pyro 850-40L
ESC: Kontronik Kosmik 200HV
Taumelscheibenservos: 4 x Futaba BLS175SV
Tandemmischer: bavarianDEMON 3SX
Beleuchtung: Emcotec Aurora LCU V2
Empfänger: Fuataba R6014FS
Puffer-Schaltung: Optipower Ultra Guard
Rotorblätter: Eigenbau
Hauptrotorkopf: 2x SAB HPS3
Akkus: 2x 6s 8000mAh
Scale: 1:6
Pilot: Bernd Fischer / http://www.helifischers.de/
Flight Style: Scale
Meeting: 15. Pöting Turbine Meeting in Kreuztal Littfeld Germany June 2016

Flying Toy and Hobby RC Helicopters

copter38

In the RC hobby, flying RC helicopters is often considered the hardest RC skill to master. This might make the marketing claims for easy-to-fly toy RC helicopters hard to understand. The difference is in the helicopter design, the controls, and the range of movement that the helicopter is capable of performing.

Hobby-grade RC helicopters are designed to look and operate very much like full-size helicopters.

Toy-grade helicopters are configured and operate a little differently. They are designed for more stable flight so that children can more easily use the transmitter and control the flight. These changes mean that the helicopter is not capable of the same speed or maneuvers as hobby-grade helicopters.Both can still be fun to fly.                                                  

Controlling RC Helicopters

What you can do with an RC helicopter (such as going up and down) are actions initiated by radio signals from the transmitter. The number of channels on a transmitter tells you the number of actions that you can control on the RC.

These actions usually involve things like changing the pitch (tilt) of the rotor blades or making the blades spin faster. A hobby-grade RC helicopter normally requires at least four or five channels for normal flight that closely mimics the controls and flight of full-size helicopters.Toy-grade helicopters may have only 2 or 3 channels and much more limited actions.

Flying Toy RC Helicopters

The typical toy heli is a 2- or 3-channel model that can fly up and down, maybe forward and sometimes backward, and go left and right. It may run at a constant speed. It can hover in place but it’s probably not going to be able to do high speed chases, loops and rolls, or inverted flight.

In order to provide more stable flight, the tail may not have the familiar tail rotor and blades of real helicopters that are set perpendicular to the main rotor.                                        

Instead they often have fixed pitch, counter-rotating dual main rotors (ringed for safety). These rotors eliminate the need for the operator to use tail rotor controls to counteract a natural phenomenum of helicopter flight that makes the body of the helicopter want to spin around and around.

Because the main rotors are fixed pitch (blades don’t tilt independently), there are no cyclic controls — tilting of the main rotor — for climbing and diving or doing banking turns. Instead, the dual main rotors provide level turning. Some models have a small rotor on the tail (parallel to the main rotors) or vertical rotors in other locations that control forward flight and provides further stability.

These design changes sacrifice some of the maneuverability found in hobby-grade helicopters but it also means that the pilot needs to perform fewer actions to keep the helicopter in flight. Simpler controls, slower speed, and less aerobatics ability makes these toy helicopters easier to fly and provide children and novice pilots with more entertainment value. It doesn’t mean that you can master RC helicopter flight right out of the package though. Even with the toy helis it takes patience and practice to hover, fly around the room, and land upright.

For a step up from toy helicopters but with the stability features that make for easier flight, consider a hobby-grade Blade CX. It provides easier hovering and control but has the advanced features of hobby helicopters.

Flying Hobby RC Helicopters

With hobby-grade RC helicopters there are many more actions that the pilot can do and needs to perform to keep the helicopter aloft. Variable pitch rotors and other design features allow the helicopters to do more diving, climbing, rolls, and loops in addition to going up and down and hovering. These actions along with adjustable speed make hobby helicopters extremely challenging to fly but also more exciting.

Transmitters for hobby RC helicopters may come with many channels to control basic helicopter functions, provide more precise control of mixed actions, and change settings on the helicopter from a distance; but, for basic flight four or five channels is normal.         cameracopter

All four or five channels are activated with just the two sticks on the transmitter. The movements typically controlled by a 5-channel transmitter are:

 

Quadcopter: 3 Things you Need to Know

drone12

Helicopters, Drones, Airplanes, Quadcopters? What does it all mean? This week we’re clearing the confusion on the very popular quadcopter. This has got to be one of the newest, trendiest, and most popular kinds of drone for sale. If you’re interested, we’ll bring you three things you must know about quadcopters.

First things first, what the heck is a quadcopter?

No need for confusion here, a quadcopter is simply an “unmanned helicopter having four motors.” Most hobby sites, like ours, also use the term to refer to any RC Drone with four motors. Want the breakdown on all other types of multicopters? Heres the list:

Helicopter: 1 motor                                                                                                                                                       copter35                                       Bicopter: 2 motors        copter36 Tricopter: 3 motors copter37  Quadcopter: 4 motors drone13 Pentacopter: 5 motors drone14 Hexacopters: 6 motors drone15 Octocopter: 8 motors drone16

The multicopter phenomenon currently ends with a Drone/Helicopter with 8 motors (which is plenty).

What you need to know if you purchase a quadcopter:

Well, first off, congratulations on your new quadcopter! We sincerely hope you enjoy it. Just like becoming a new driver, you’ll need to know a few things before you fly your drone.

1. Drone Registration: It is a mandatory thing to do for all drones weighing .55 pounds and less than 55 pounds must be registered to the FAA. Don’t worry, it won’t cost you much, but you must do it before flying your drone.

2. Locate your Power Switch: Sorry if we sound like Captain Obvious here, but you’d be surprised, sometimes it is hard to find this tiny switch. Once you do find it, turn your quadcopter on to see if it had any charge. Test your controller by pressing buttons to make sure that your quadcopter and remote are in sync. If there is no signal, refer to your owners manual to sync both of your devices.

3. Charge Time:  All quadcopters are different, but knowing your quadcopter’s charge time is very important. Find out the time LIMIT. Do not exceed your charging limit because you WILL burn out your battery and have to purchase a new one.

4. Flight time: The more money you spend on your quadcopter, the longer you’ll be in the air. When a quadcopter is about to die, it will simply fall from whatever height it is at. If you know your flight time, you can estimate at what time you should bring your quadcopter down to a shorter height as to not cause damage.

5. Range of Flight: How far does your quadcopter go? Know your range of flight so you can always be in control. For all quadcopters, there is a 400 foot height restriction to prevent interference with Aircraft.

6. Short list of general rules to know:

– Avoid flying in residential or highly populated areas. Not all people are comfortable with quadcopters, and if you lose control, you could crash into someone.

– Keep your drone within eyesight at all times.

– Check your local laws to see if there are any restrictions on where you can or cannot fly your quadcopter.

How to fly your quadcopter:

Now that you know the lingo and the rules, here’s how to get your quadcopter in the air.

Before you fly, check everything off this list:

  • -Remote battery is charged
  • -Quadcopter battery is charged
  • -Micro SD card is in place if there is a camera option
  • -Make sure all pieces of your quadcopter are secure
  • -Pick a flight location with a soft landing and no crowd
  • -Make sure there is no wind or rain to cause flight problems
  • -Be sure you can maintain a direct line of sight at all times with your quadcopter

Learn the lingo of your Transmitter:If you ever need to refer back to your manual for additional instructions, there will be certain terminology to understand in order to use your controller.                         drone17

Roll: Action of pushing the right stick to the left or right. This will “roll” your quadcopter diagonally to the left or right.

Pitch: Action of pushing the right stick forwards or backwards. This will tilt the quadcopter to move forward or backwards.

Yaw: Action of pushing the left stick to the left or right. This will help you change directions while in flight.

Throttle: Action of pushing the left stick forward. This will adjust the height or altitude of your quadcopter. This is the action you will need to use to get your quadcopter off the ground.

Trim: Buttons that will help you increase or decrease the sensitivity of the roll, pitch, yaw, and throttle.

Getting off the ground: All you need is throttle. Use your left stick to put your drone in the air. Make sure you move your left stick smoothly and slowly to achieve more height. Slowly release your left stick to gently place your quadcopter back on the ground.

Once you feel comfortable with flying up and down, try out the rest of your remote functions. One by one, add throttle and yaw, throttle and roll, and throttle and pitch. Moving between all of these functions will get you more comfortable with flying your quadcopter.                                                                                   Credits: http://www.hobbytron.com/blog/   http://   

How to Start off With Flying RC Helicopters

Have you ever wanted to fly radio controlled helicopters, but never known how to start? This article contains everything you’ll need to know about flying an RC helicopter. It’s quite easy and fun once you get the hang of it. Read on to see how!                                                    

1

Start off with a 3 channel helicopter. These should be easy to fly and some can be flown inside. Most of these helicopters will be pretty small so do not fly them outside in the wind or else you can end up breaking your helicopter or someone else’s stuff or hurting someone. copter20

2

Don’t fly far away on your first flight and try to have a fair idea of the range.Before purchasing an RC helicopter model or toy make sure that you can use the frequency and that it won’t interfere with anything else or get interfered with. If this happens you can end up not being able to control your helicopter and it will do what it wants (which is most likely to crash without your knowledge). You can avoid this by buying a helicopter with a 2.4GHz radio, which does not suffer from interference by other sources.  copter21

3

Try to avoid buying a tiny little micro helicopter as the tail motors tend to wear out quickly and the batteries don’t last long.                                                                                                      copter22                                                                                                                      

4

Once you have mastered flying a 2 channel or a 3 channel you can upgrade by purchasing a 4 channel type helicopter.

    

The Most Popular and Salable RC Helicopter: V911

 Model : V911 2.4GHz 4 channel
Size: 22*8.2cm
Main Blade Length : 19.2cm
Tail Rotor Diameter: 3.6cm
Weight (without power system) : 27.8g
Power supply: Li-polymer Battery 3.7V 120mAh /15C(included)
Flight distance :80-100M
4CH copter Micro Series , 2.4 GHZ overclocking remote control
Function: 3D Omni-Directional flight, rise, fall, forward,backward, turn left, turn right,360 turn left side flying right side flying hover.
Apply to indoor and outdoor flight, over length remote control distance.
Flying stability, easy to operate.
Auto-protection for charging to avoid overcharge.
High capacity battery and strong power motor enable the helicopter to fly much longer and more powerful.
With a USB cable to make charging more convenient.
Excellent flight either indoors or outdoors.  http://

Beginners guide to RC helicopters

 An introduction to the different types of RC helicopter, showing which ones are easy to fly and which ones are harder.Uploaded on Jun 29, 2011. Credit:Duncan Mather http://

The Beginner’s Guide To Flying RC Helicopters

download ClickFlying a radio control helicopter is one of the most rewarding of all rc disciplines, there’s no question about that!

But where do you start? For the complete newbie, it’s a minefield. The selection of helis available is simply overwhelming, and the information about them even more so.

 The Beginner’s Guide To Flying RC Helicopters ” e-book, written by myself and John Salt (rchelicopterfun.com), breaks down all the barriers and answers the questions that the complete beginners to the hobby is likely to have, from understanding what a swashplate is to knowing how to perform that first aerobatic maneuver.
In short, this e-book has been written from the ground up, and is a complete, no-nonsense resource that gets you flying an rc heli. And understanding them properly at the same time!

If you’re thinking about entering the exhilarating hobby of rc helicopter flying and have enjoyed reading this website, but want to know more, then look no further than this fully comprehensive e-book.

The Beginner’s Guide To Flying RC Helicopters topics include…

  • Understanding RC systems & how they control the helicopter
  • Knowing which heli suits your needs
  • Multi-rotors and Flybarless systems
  • Helicopter controls and how they work
  • Finding somewhere suitable to fly
  • Preparing the helicopter for flight
  • Essential pre-flight checks you need to know
  • Complete flight school to get you airborne safely
  • How to deal with a crash
  • …and much much more!

RC Helicopters

 

Beginner’s Guide to RC Helicopters

NOT LONG AGO, RC helicopters were nothing more than a curiosity. There were only a handful of kits on the market and you practically had to be a mechanical engineer to put one together.

There might be one—or if you were lucky, two—helicopter pilots at a local flying field. Helicopter pilots would usually be left to themselves, subject to an array of whispered jokes such as, “Those things don’t fly; they are so ugly the ground repels them,” or “They don’t fly, they beat the air in to submission,” and others. Knowing looks were exchanged by the airplane pilots that said, “He’s a nice enough guy but he’s a little strange; he flies helicopters.”

Fast forward to today. At many flying fields, the helicopters present at a field can equal or even exceed the number of airplanes. Even if they are hidden in the back seat of their trucks, many of the sneering airplane pilots secretly own an electric helicopter or two.

Now there are so many kits available in nearly every imaginable shape and size that a beginner interested in getting started in the hobby can easily be overwhelmed. Offerings range from RTF helis that you can unpack, charge, and fly, to kits that you have to build from bags of parts.

Sizes range from diminutive electric-powered models that you can fly in your living room to turbine-powered scale masterpieces that require a trailer to transport them to the flying field. A first-time helicopter buyer is likely to encounter a confusing array of terms such as ARF, RTF, BNF, coaxial, fixed pitch, collective pitch, electric, nitro, and gas.

What this article is going to attempt to do is explain these terms and help the first-time helicopter buyer make an informed decision concerning which category best suits his or her needs and interests.
Size (abridged from article):Modern electric-powered helicopters are slightly more difficult to classify size wise, but they generally range from rotor spans in the 7-inch range (the tiny T-Rex 100) to the 700 size, spanning nearly 5½ feet. I’ve seen an electric-powered Scale helicopter with a main rotor span of slightly more than 90 inches!

Loose comparisons can be made to nitro-powered helicopters. A 550 electric is roughly the same size as a .30-size fuel-powered helicopter; a 600 electric is .50 size, and a 700 electric is .90 size. The 100 through 450-size smaller electrics have no mainstream fuel-powered equivalent.

Many factors go into deciding which size helicopter to purchase.
Flight Controls (abridged from article): Not unlike an airplane, a helicopter requires four primary flight controls: pitch (elevator), roll (aileron), yaw (rudder or tail rotor), and throttle. The elevator and ailerons are combined on the right stick (Mode 2) in what is called the cyclic control. This is what gives us directional control of the helicopter.
Rotor Head Designs (abridged from article): As mentioned, we generally have two types of main rotor head design: fixed pitch and collective pitch. The advantage of fixed pitch is that the design is simple so it’s inexpensive to produce.

As the name implies, the pitch angle of the main rotor blades is fixed and the amount of lift produced varies by changing rotor head’s rpm. In addition to the simplicity of the design, a fixed-pitch rotor head requires only one channel to control altitude.

The disadvantages of fixed pitch are that performance is somewhat limited, and if you get the rotor head too slow while descending, you might not get the rpm back in time to prevent impact with Mother Earth.
Tail control (abridged from article): Torque produced by the main rotor has to be counteracted or the heli’s fuselage will spin in the opposite direction of the main rotor. Typically this is accomplished by the addition of a tail rotor.

Like the main rotor system, the tail rotor can be either a fixed-pitch variable-speed design, or a fixed-speed variable-pitch design. Fixed-pitch tail rotor designs have a small motor mounted on the tail and the variable pitch ones drive the tail rotor from the main motor.
Fuel or electric power (abridged from article): The debate between fuel power and electric power has been going like the Energizer Bunny. The winner is … there’s no clear winner. Each has its own learning curves and unique support equipment to purchase.

In the case of fuel power, you need a fuel pump, glow plugs and a way to light them, and, of course, fuel. Then you have to learn to operate and tune an internal-combustion engine. Most fuel-powered helicopters use traditional model fuel (methanol, oil, and nitro methane), but there are two-stroke gasoline-powered engines available as well.

Several flights can be made on a single receiver battery charge so you can get a number of flights in while only stopping to refuel.

If you go with electric power, there are speed controllers, motors, and batteries to purchase. To fully explain how to properly choose your electrical system components such as the speed controller, electric motor, and batteries would encompass a small book.

Fortunately there are a number of packages available, supplied with components chosen from extensive flight testing, that are proven to work well together. Then you have to learn how to properly charge, and handle LiPo batteries.  Credits: http://modelaviation.com  Written by Andrew Griffith   http://       

 

RC Helicopters with Wifi Cameras

The radio controlled helicopters which are popularly called RC Helicopters aircraft. There those that are prototypical available for greater maneuverability while these types have a reduction or decrease in the aerobatic control. These are RC helicopters with wifi cameras.

These aircrafts are operated by users using the remote control due to the tiny servos that have been placed on a particular part of the plane. Most people who operate RC helicopters do so for entertainment purposes.

These aircrafts are generally made by experts and there are three categories available for purchase by enthusiasts and people in professions that require the use of RC helicopters. cameracopter

 

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