Tagged: RC Racing

Water Drop Effect — Proline How to Paint series

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Modifying Your RC Motor

Nine Easy Go-FastMods- It’s no question – the sensation of speed is one of the most popular aspects of radio control. Racers and bashers may differ in many ways when it comes to how they enjoy their favorite hobby, but they both share their desire for faster acceleration and higher velocity. From cleaning and oiling bearings to installing more horsepower, there are many ways to make your car faster – some without spending any money!

mod1 http:/  I dug deep into the RCCA archives for this gem – nine easy go fast mods. Enjoy the read, then start wrenching – after all, you’ve got races to win…even if they’re just down the street.

MAXIMUM VELOCITY MINIMUM EFFORT
Words: Kevin Hetmanski

Who doesn’t like to go fast? Nobody. Who wants to go faster? Everybody! Without spending a lot of time or dough, following these 8 tips will help you add a few more miles per hour and a little more distance between you and the second-fastest guy on the block. Think of them as “speed reading.”

POP THE CARB RESTRICTER

If you remove the carb restricter, you can uncork an extra mph or 2 as well as some snappier acceleration.

SPEED INCREASE ª 2MPH

Most nitro cars come with unrestricted carbs, but if your carb has a restricter (such as on this Associated GT2 RTR), you can gain a few mph by popping it out. When we tested the GT2 RTR, removing the restricter added 2.7mph and made the throttle punchier, which is great on pavement and other high-grip surfaces but can cause spin outs in low-grip dirt. So, if you pop the restricter, keep it in your toolbox; you may want to put it back in!

USE A 7-CELL OR LIPO PACK

Upgrading to LiPo power will save more than 3 ounces of weight and increase voltage for a significant speed boost.

SPEED INCREASE ª5 TO 10MPH

Boosting voltage is an easy, no-mod way to increase the speed of any electric car, provided your speed control can handle the extra juice. If you switch from a 6-cell pack to a 7-cell, you’ll increase voltage from 7.2 to 8.4 volts and have a significant increase in off-the-line punch and top speed. You can get a similar benefit (along with reduced weight and increased run time) by switching to LiPo power. A 2-cell LiPo pack delivers 7.4 volts; that doesn’t seem like a big voltage gain, but it does make a very noticeable difference in performance because the pack is also 3.5 ounces (give or take) lighter than a sub-C pack.

RUN FUEL WITH A HIGHER NITRO PERCENTAGE

More nitro means more speed-producing power.

SPEED INCREASE ª2 TO 5MPH

More nitro means a bigger boom with each combustion cycle, and that means more speed (or at least you’ll have the power you need to spin a taller gear ratio, and that will mean more speed). For maximum engine life, we suggest that you run 20-percent nitro for regular running, but when it’s time to crush the other guys in the neighborhood, reach for a jug of 30 percent. But be warned, the engine will run hotter.

INSTALL A HOTTER MOTOR

Drop in a hotter motor, like a 10.5 from Tekin’s Gen2 series, and you can easily add 10mph or more, depending on the motor you’re replacing.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 15MPH

Swapping a Neon’s 4-banger for a big-cube V-8 would be a herculean task in the full-size hot-rodding world, but similar performance gains are as simple as removing two screws on an electric RC car. Most RTRs include an anemic 540 motor that’s good for about 18mph; install a modified motor, and you can easily double that speed; the lower the number of winds, the faster the motor. One caveat: the faster the motor, the greater the strain it will put on your car’s speed control, hence the “motor limit” rating for most speed controls. Check your speed control’s manual, and stick with a motor that has the same number or more winds than the limit.

INSTALL BALL BEARINGS

For the ultimate in friction-fighting, ceramic bearings like these from Acer are the way to go.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 2MPH

Fresh bushings can actually outperform grease-packed ball bearings, but bushings quickly degrade and that costs speed. For maximum velocity, metal-shielded (not rubber-sealed) bearings are best. Most cars already have ball-bearing transmissions, so all you have to do is pop bearings into the hubs. The speed increase won’t be dramatic and will depend on the state of your car’s drivetrain before the install, but you’ll get more than speed: bearings greatly outlast bushings and take the slop out of rotating parts.

SWAP MONSTER TREADS FOR STREET TIRES

Pro-Line’s Road Rage tires (left) will let your truck reach its maximum speed potential on pavement; bar-treads such as those on the Mashers (right) require more power to spin.

SPEED INCREASE ª2 TO 5MPH

Gnarly monster treads are fine for the dirt and grass, but their excessive weight and rolling resistance robs you of speed on pavement. If you trade those treads in for street rubber, your truck will need less power to overcome that weight and rolling resistance, leaving more power for pure speed once you’re geared to take advantage of that power and to compensate for what will likely be smaller-diameter tires.

TUNE THE ENGINE

Don’t be afraid to lean it out! You can always richen it back up if you go too far.

SPEED INCREASE ªUP TO 10MPH

The only thing more amazing than the amount of power a little nitro RC engine can make is how much less power it makes if the needle settings are just a little off. We’ve seen guys give up half their engine performance to bad tuning, typically by running the engine too rich. Lean the high end out by turning it clockwise 1/12 turn (think of it as 5 minutes on the face of a clock), and make a few passes to see if your engine reaches higher rpm (and thus, higher speed). When the engine stutters at full throttle or starts running closer to 300 degrees, it’s too lean; aback it off until the engine sings a clear high note at full throttle with a faint smoke trail from the pipe.

CUT THE FAT

Kevin Hetmanski’s race-prepped Revo is full of weight-saving tricks: graphite chassis, deleted receiver and battery boxes, single high-torque steering servo to replace dual servos.

SPEED INCREASE ª1 TO 3MPH

If you can trim weight from your ride, it won’t need as much power to get up to speed, and that means it can go even faster. Exactly how much weight you can lop off depends on the type of vehicle you have. A burly monster truck with 8 shocks, heavy tires, a reverse-gear servo and other not-essential-for-speed parts can be lightened significantly by removing the superfluous parts, but a racing-style buggy, stadium truck, or touring car might only have a few grams to offer (don’t bother).

FAST FACT

When looking for weight savings, go to the wheels and tires first. The old racers’ adage “a pound of rotating weight is like 2 pounds of non-rotating weight” is very true, especially if you have a monster truck with heavy chevron tires!

GEARING THE REAL SECRET OF SPEED

A set of pinion gears such as these from Robinson Racing will let you match your car’s gearing to its power potential.

All of the tips outlined in this article can increase speed, but to really take advantage of them, proper gearing is essential. Otherwise, you’ll probably see quicker acceleration but little or no increase in top speed, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as acceleration wins more races than sheer speed. But when absolute speed is the goal, it’s all about gearing. To understand why, think of your car as a bicycle, and its engine as your legs.

THINK PEDAL POWER

Put your bike in first (the easiest) gear, and you can easily pedal to your maximum rpm. You probably aren’t going very fast, but you can really spin the pedals. A lighter bike, more aerodynamic position, or reduced rolling resistance won’t help you go any faster, since your legs are already going as fast as they can. So you up shift the bike to a taller gear ratio, and you go faster, and you keep up shifting and going faster until the gear ratio is too tall for the strength of your legs to overcome. The same thing is going on in your RC car. Unless your modification increases the motor’s or engine’s rpm, your car won’t go faster. But if you make it more powerful (or free up more power by diverting less to fighting inertia and rolling resistance), your powerplant will be able to turn a taller gear ratio for more speed just like an Olympic cyclist is able to go faster because he has stronger legs to turn a bigger gear on his bicycle.

PUTTING IT TO WORK IN RC

There are two ways to gear up an RC car for more speed: install a pinion or clutch bell with more teeth or a spur gear with fewer teeth. This will make your car roll farther with each turn of the engine’s crank or the motor’s output shaft and thus increase speed. Try going up two teeth maximum on the clutch bell, or up to four teeth on the pinion gear. Don’t overdo it; if you gear the car too high, you’ll strain the powerplant, and you may actually go slower. Check your manual for suggested gear ratio ranges.                 Credits:    http:// http:// Remote Control Toys on Sale

RC Cars Suspension Tuning

– Basic Suspension Tuning –

With Mark Pavidis suspension1http:// Mark Pavidis is old school. He’s been making A-mains at big races since some of today’s younger pro racers were in diapers. He has raced for some of the biggest companies in our industry, and has helped developed some of the most influential chassis, tire, and component designs in the RC world. Mark has been competitive at the top levels of RC racing longer than anyone from any part of the world, and many racers from any generation regard him as one of the toughest competitors they’ve ever faced.

He has won U.S. National championships in several classes, including 1/8-Scale Buggy. Along with Japanese legend Masami Hirosaka, Mark is the only other driver to win IFMAR World titles in both on-road and off-road competition. Unlike Masami, or any other driver, Mark is the only driver ever to win IFMAR World championships in both electric and nitro competitions. His 2006 IFMAR 1/8-Scale Off-Road title reaffirmed his place in RC history as one of the best racers of all time.

I sat down with Mark at AKA’s new offices in Murrieta, California, to discuss the most common adjustments available on today’s nitro buggies. When Mark Pavidis talks buggy setup, we listen.  suspension2  CAMBER
Camber is the relationship of the tire to the ground, such that a tire that is perpendicular to the racing surface has zero camber. If the top of the tire leans in toward the car, it has negative camber; likewise, a tire that leans outward at the top has positive camber.

Front Camber. Adding more negative camber to the front of your buggy will make your car less aggressive, especially when turning into the corner. More negative camber will also lessen the chances that the front tires will catch on ruts or bumps. Mark says, “On rough or high speed tracks, adding more negative camber is an important adjustment to make.” It’s usually best to start with a little bit of negative camber in the front.

Taking away negative camber (or even adding positive camber) to the front of your buggy takes away a little bit of overall steering, but will make your buggy steer into the corner more aggressively since the corner of the tire will dig into the track’s surface. This can help on slower tracks with plenty of high-speed corners.

Rear Camber. More negative camber in the rear tires will free up the rear of the car, making it whip around by taking away lateral traction. As with the front of the car, more negative camber will help your buggy navigate through rough sections of the track.

Running less negative camber in the rear will take away a little bit of overall steering, but your buggy will handle more responsively. If the track is not bumpy and has good traction, try running less negative camber to help carry more speed through corners.     suspension3 CAMBER LINK POSITIONS
The optional camber link mounting holes alter the rate at which the camber angle changes throughout the suspension’s movement. For the purposes of making only the following changes, you should reset your camber angles after moving the camber link locations.

Front
Outside (on the front hub).
A longer link means the camber will change less as the suspension compresses, which will make the car turn in harder but push exiting the corner.
Moving to the inside hole will give more camber rise, which smooths out initial turn-in but adds steering through the middle and exit of the corner.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Raising the inner mount will keep the front end more flat. On high bite and smooth track, this will smooth out your car’s steering response and make it easier to drive.
Lowering the inner mount will add body roll and make the car more aggressive. Mark almost always runs the lowest hole available.

Rear
Outside (on the rear hub).
A longer link gives less camber rise, which means less traction. On a high speed track with high grip, this will add more support by eliminating body roll.
A shorter link equals more camber rise and more traction. Because a shorter link will make the rear of the car feel softer, it will better handle rough sections of the track.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Moving the inner camber link mount to the inside or outside hole will have the same effect as changing the length of the link on the hub.
Raising the link on the rear shock tower will keep the buggy flat through corners and have less camber rise; this is a good adjustment to make on a smooth track with high traction.
Lowering the link will add camber rise and make the car more forgiving when the track is rough.
Moving the link out on both the shock tower and the hub, which will keep the camber link the same length, will add support and make the rear of the car feel stiffer. suspension4

TOE-IN / TOE-OUT
This is the angle of the tires when compared to the centerline of the car. A tire that has zero toe is pointing straight ahead. Toe-in means that the tires point in toward each other, while toe-out is the opposite.

Front Toe
1/8-Scale Buggies almost always run toe-out in the front. Adding more toe-out will make the car smoother and easier to drive on big tracks, as well as increase low-speed steering by decreasing the car’s turning radius.
Likewise, decreasing toe-out (even to the point of running zero toe) will give the car more initial steering response. This is usually only done on tight, low-speed tracks.
Mark says, “If you run toe-in (at the front), your car won’t come out of the corner very well, and initial turn-in will be too darty. If you run toe-out, it will turn in and come out of the corner much smoother.”

Rear Toe
The rear of the car is much different, as toe-out is never used. Adding more rear toe-in will add overall rear traction, both in a straight line and during cornering.
On the flip side, less toe-in will increase steering since the rear tires will have less traction. Also, the rear suspension and driveshafts will be at less of an angle, which will help on rough sections of the track.
Mark says, “Nine times out of ten, I run maximum rear toe-in (on the Kyosho MP9, this is three degrees of toe-in per side). The only time I run less is in truggy, because there’s already so much grip.” Also, he suggests only changing the inner pivot blocks to adjust toe-in rather than using rear hubs with different angles of toe-in. Changing the rear hubs will increase the angle of the driveshaft joint and change how the car works. suspension5KICK-UP
Kick-up is the angle between the ground and the lower inner hinge pins on which the suspension arms swing. Altering kick-up will affect the car much like caster does. In addition, adding kick-up will make your bump higher and further. You should only consider decreasing kick-up when the track has few or no jumps. suspension6

SHOCK POSITION
Tower. Moving the shock in on the tower will make the shock feel more progressive i.e.; initially it will feel softer, but increasing in stiffness as the shock compresses. If the track is slippery, move the shock in on the tower to add body roll and overall traction.
Moving the shock outward will make the shock feel more linear. This will free up the car and make it jump much better. On a track with lots of grip, move your shocks out on the tower to reduce body roll.

Arm. Moving to a more inward shock location on the arm will make the buggy feel softer and less stable. For blown out tracks, this adjustment will help navigate bumps and ruts without hurting the car’s jumping performance as much as moving the shock inward on the tower.
An outer shock position on the arm will make the car rotate more during cornering, and make the buggy feel more stable. This comes at the expense of rough track performance.

SHOCKS
Shock Oil. Thicker shock oil will help the car to navigate larger jumps and bumps since the oil will slow the reaction of the shock. In hot weather, increase the weight of your shock oil to maintain the same damping characteristics.
Thinner shock oil will allow the shock to react more quickly, and help your buggy soak up smaller bumps and track imperfections. If your buggy works well in warm weather, switch to thinner shock oil in very cold conditions.
Mark explains, “Temperature is a huge part of choosing shock oil.”

Shock Pistons. Choosing the correct shock pistons is quite simple. On smooth tracks with big jumps, Mark suggests using smaller pistons to slow down the shock action. On rough tracks with fewer jumps, reach for pistons with larger holes to allow the shock to soak up the ruts.

Shock Springs. Mark doesn’t often change his shock springs to adjust his car. In fact, he suggests changing both the front and rear springs at the same time to maintain the same balance front to rear. If the track surface is slippery, go to lighter springs to create more body roll and slow the car’s reactions. On asphalt, grass or Astroturf tracks with tons of grip, use heavier springs at both ends of the car to resist traction rolling.

CONCLUSION
As you’ll notice, each adjustment sacrifices a particular handling trait to gain another. There’s no magic adjustment to make your car “super dialed”, so decide what your buggy needs to do differently, make changes to your car, and see if your lap times improve. This guide should serve as a perfect compliment to the most useful tool you’ll ever find in your RC career: practice.

                                                                                                                                                               

Source:

http:// Remote Control Toys on Sale

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

I’m so glad I decided to go to the Hobby Garage in Kuki the other day. Had I not, I don’t think I would have ever understood what “custom” really means to RC car enthusiasts in Japan. If you thought what you saw in yesterday’s post was impressive, well all I can say is scroll down and be further surprised…I sure was once I had the chance to go through every car entered in the contest!

Check out this S13 body. So many cool details like the ground-scarping front lip spoiler, plenty of negative camber and the model-car equivalent of rolled fenders. It’s all about the tuck!

Next to it was this camo Onevia running even more camber, “bolted on” overfenders…

…and a pink engine. Despite only having 4-ignition leads and four intake runners on the plenum it did look more like an RB than an SR!

I guess if you want to place high at these sort of competitions, you really have to push your imagination and think outside the box. This beaten up S15 reminded me of what some of those crazy drifters end up doing to their cars at events like the Drift Matsuri in Ebisu Circuit.

Looks like it took some pretty big hits and a few excursions into the mud, but at least it’s still straight enough to drift!

We saw a little teaser image of this Toyota Estima minivan yesterday. Aside from the fact that it’s already quite cool that you can get these sort of bodies for 1/10th scale chassis…

…it obviously doesn’t stop owners taking them to the next level. This is probably inspired by those vans that show up at Daikoku PA on a Saturday night and blast out ridiculously loud music.

It even had a fully decked out trunk with big subwoofers and a functioning LCD screen. There were two smaller additional screens on either side of the van too. A constant power supply kept the mini-screens functioning and the music playing.

And if you think that’s wild take a look at this Subaru BRZ. This fully functional drift car was equipped with all sorts of cool touches…

…like the custom turbo boxer engine, angel eyes in the headlights….

…but most incredible of all was the custom drop top conversion. It took the owner eight months of hard work to design and build the mechanical servo-actuated roof and trunk! A second remote control is needed to actuate the opening and closing of the roof, trunk and hood.

But no matter how simple or complex the cars may be, each have their own appeal.

This “Arctic version” 180SX is one I really liked. The idea alone was so bizarre but so cool at the same time it was probably the one that made me smile the most.

And of course the details are painstakingly realistic!

Nomuken in the house! Well not really as he’s driving an 86 nowadays, but you know what I mean…

Not sure what the inspiration for this 86 was, it certainly does share some similarities with Orido’s D1 car but is seriously beefed up in the fender department.

Our very own Mad Mike should be very happy to see this particular FD!

Any DTM fans out there? Then this Alfa Romeo 155 V6 Ti inspired build…

…will be right down your street.

The Volklinger S14 we saw last year at Hellaflush Kansai and Slammed Society events had inspired lots of other military-themed cars, including scaled ones too of course.

There were a good couple of hours for us all to take closer look of the cars present and submit our votes.

Towards the end of the video presentation of the cars there was one last-minute addition…from me!

In the hope that I would get some time after the event to drift, I brought my brand new RTR-X Mustang from HPI that arrived the other day from the US. I thought it would be a great chance to break her in at a pro Japanese track and once the organizers heard I had a car of my own they let me add it to the line up.

So it got its own video presentation! Some of the guys there seemed to like the eight velocity stacks sticking out of the hood as well as the color matched wheels. It was a great moment; I almost felt accepted, like I was one of them. Unfortunately they all knew it was  completely stock and I hadn’t even turned a screw on it so I dropped the act and continued taking pictures.

Not before I had time to waste one battery though…we all need breaks right!

The owner of this Countach probably thought it would be a sacrilege to have a Lambo and not have the scissor doors open. So he fixed that, and you can now open and close them at the flick of a switch. He was even drifting it with the doors up…letting all the haters hate. That’s right!

Here is another Drift Matsuri missile special. It takes some real skills to make this sort of carnage look realistic…

…all the way down to the rust sport and the shattered glass.

You kyusha fans out there will love this S30 Fairlady Z. As the owner showed me on his phone, Linhbergh’s feature on “that 240Z” was the inspiration.

Pretty damn cool right?

After having shot each entrant’s car in detail I took a wonder over to the track side of the Hobby Garage, where things were very busy with lots of drifting, charging, fine tuning.

It’s there that I spotted even more cool builds, and it seems that most of the guys that were part of the Custom Body Contest had also brought…

…one or is some cases two or more other chassis and bodies to play with.

It’s almost unheard of to see anyone use a stock controller to drift cars at the track. Everyone sports the latest and most expensive commanders, usually just as accessorized as the cars and chassis themselves with carbon-look wraps and replacement steering “wheels.”

Some other cool cars I spotted on track were this pair of Toyotas, this MotorFIX-inspired Corolla…

…and this widebody slammed KP61 Starlet.

Later on in the afternoon it was time for the prizes to be handed out. The organizers of the event at the Hobby Garage had come up with a novel way of eliminating the finalists that didn’t make it to the top spot in the three different categories. If not unanimously voted the best, it was simply flushed down and dropped through a remote-operated trap door! (don’t worry there were a couple of pillows to cushion the fall)

The camo Onevia took the win in the S-chassis group…

…while the shakotan Z grabbed the top spot in the miscellaneous category.

Long and hard work obviously paid off as the top prize in the custom category went to the drop-top BRZ.

After the award ceremony everyone was invited to the main track…

…to join in a few slow parade laps…which quickly turned into a bit of hard drift session!

What a great Sunday out this turned out to be. It was the perfect example of how many different ways enthusiasts, or otakus in this case (!), can enjoy their passion for cars. http://Remote Control Toys on Sale                                                               Credits:    http://www.speedhunters.com/  http://

Newbie Nitro RC Tips

car1

HPI Racing 112619 Nitro RS4 3 Mustang RTR-X RTR 

HUGE SPEEDS ON A SMALL SCALE!
2.2 HORSEPOWER FOR MAXIMUM FUN

World Champion Drifter Vaughn Gittin Jr. and the Need for Speed crew teamed up to build this one-of-a-kind, fully-functional Street, Track and Drift machine, and this is the official, authorized RC nitro replica, powered by HPI Nitro muscle! While Vaughn will be the only one thrashing the full-size car, the entire world will be able to enjoy driving the HPI Nitro 1/10th version: The Nitro RS4 3 Evo+! With the 1969 Mustang RTR-X body on our super-popular Nitro on-road platform, you’ll get a combination that will inspire tire-burning, smoke-churning fun for grins and speed wherever you go!

With a stiff aluminum chassis, 4WD shaft drivetrain and adjustable oil-filled shock absorbers, the Nitro RS4 3 Evo+ is a scaled-down race car for the street – the perfect foundation for a tire-smoking muscle car like the real 1969 Mustang RTR-X! The Nitro RS4 3 Evo+ is built from the ground up for speed, durability and performance, and with its Ready To Run ease you can be off and running within minutes of opening the box!

This car is loaded with goodies: a 2.2hp HPI T3.0 engine fitted with an adjustable 2-speed transmission for ground-stomping acceleration and superfast top speeds, full-time 4WD for supreme control and acceleration, steel shaft drivetrain that lets you shrug off road debris that would halt a belt-drive car in its tracks,waterproof electronics so you don’t have to worry about wet conditions and a 2.4GHz radio system that lets you have worry-free fun!                                                      car12

Vortex SS 1/10 Scale Nitro Desert Truck

Hold on tight! There’s a Vortex coming. Complete with full fendered body, scale off road tires, and beefy front and rear bumpers, the Vortex SS is ready to throw down.

A 3.0cc SH-18 nitro engine, precisely tuned aluminum exhaust pipe, and performance header provide the power and precision needed to blow away the competition.

 

Completely adjustable pillow ball suspension provides smooth performance for any terrain.

 

The Vortex SS has many blue anodized aluminum parts including its 2.5mm chassis, race adjustable shock towers, tunable oil filled coil over shocks, and heat sink. Not only will the Vortex SS be screaming around the track or blasting over dunes, it’ll look good doing it.

 

The 2-speed transmission allows crazy amounts of low end torque, while still providing blistering 2nd gear top speeds. Easily adjust the shift point,with the turn of a screw. Composite disc brakes and a 2.4GHz radio system ensure control, while shaft driven 4WD provides the traction needed to create a Vortex of excitement!

IFMAR 1/10th World championships

racing1 racing2 racing3From RC Racing the worlds no1 RC TV show – www.rcracing.tv – The deciding race of the 2008 1/10th TV worlds from Bangkok Thailand – Race commentary by John Hindhaugh, with Nick Daman in th epits!