Tagged: RC Trucks

SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD

SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD                                                            2005 marked the birth of the Axial brand, and shortly after, thoughts about the first SCX10 began, with development wrapping up in 2008. The SCX10 was introduced to the world as a builders kit, paving the way, or better yet, raising the bar for a new generation of scale trail enthusiasts. Previously, hobbyists had to “scratch build” a rig which presented a lot of technical hurdles to overcome. The SCX10 kit gave these “artists” time to focus their attention on other things like personalization and visual customization by removing the issues scratch-built scale rigs presented. And, it wasn’t just as a great kit to build, it was also a very capable driving machine, making it the de facto scale rig the world over. The SCX10 chassis platform provided all the technical attributes as well as scale looks with its signature all-metal twin c-channel frame, solid performing transmission and axles that provided enough realism with capabilities to match.                                                 With the SCX10 II, we’ve kept essence of the SCX10 there with all-metal twin c-channel frame rails, but that’s only 2% of the 98% of a completely new design. Scale AR44 high pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed transmission, front mounted battery tray, all aluminum suspension links, and a properly designed suspension for nearly zero bump steer. These are just a few of the features built into the all new SCX10 II.  

The original AX10 axle was developed in 2007 for Axial’s first kit, the AX90001 Axial AX10 Scorpion RC Comp 10 – 1/10th Scale Rock Crawler – Electric Kit. In 2008, the AX10 axle was used in the SCX10 chassis, which paved the way for the scale trail scene.

While developing the next iteration of axles such as the AR60, we started thinking about what kind of axle would be more suited for the future of the SCX10. Our design of a new axle needed to feature three key points. First, we wanted the axle housing to visually quench the thirst of scale enthusiasts. Second, we needed to create a gear set with the technical attributes to overcome the torque twist that is often associated with smaller gear sets. Third, the axle itself needed to be durable.

After seven years of utilizing the original AX10 axle and two years of development, Axial is proud to introduce the industry’s first high pinion gear set in our newly developed AR44 axle! The next chapter of the Axial SCX10 begins with true technological engineering and scale realism!                                                   

AR44 HI-PINION AXLES
In 2008, the AX10™ axle was used in the launch of the SCX10™ chassis platform. While developing the next iteration of axles such as the AR60, the thought process began on what kind of axle would be best for the future of the SCX10™. Axial’s development of a new axle needed to feature three key design points. First, an axle housing to visually quench the thirst of scale enthusiasts. Second, a gear set with the technical attributes to overcome the torque twist often associated with smaller gear sets. Third, the axle itself needed to retain the durability associated with the SCX10™, despite being delivered in a smaller axle housing. After seven years of utilizing the original AX10™ axle and two years of development, Axial is proud to introduce our newly developed AR44 axle with the industry’s first high pinion gear set. The next chapter of the Axial SCX10™ begins with scale realism backed with true technological development!

• High pinion gears for added ground clearance & better driveshaft angles
• The high pinion design allows increased gear surface contact for increased durability
• Larger load bearings used around the gear set to reduce flex and create a stronger drivetrain
• Single piece axle housing for added strength
• 1-piece all-metal locker front and rear
• Small pumpkin for increased clearance and a more realistic, scale look
• Bolt on link mounts
• Knuckle carriers and straight axle adapters have a better mounting system with 10-degree increment adjustments
• Optimized gear ratio – 3.75 compared to 2.92 previously. This reduces torque twist which is typically seen with other small pumpkin axle designs                                                                                                                  KINGPIN ANGLE
The AR44 axle was designed for both aesthetics and functionality. To improve upon the older AX10 axle, we designed the steering components with an 8 degree kingpin angle which results in a positive scrub radius. Making this change to the pivot point means less tire scrub for steering efficiency and less load on the steering servo.

• 8 degree kingpin angle
• Improved scrub radius over the AX10 axle                                                                                                                 AR44 UNIVERSAL AXLE SET
Universal joint axles allow up to 45 degrees of steering and provide smoother action for a higher performing, efficient drivetrain.

• Up to 45 degrees of steering
• Smooth action for an efficient drivetrain
• Compact yet durable design
• Hardened steel construction                                                                                                                                          SCX10 II™ TRANSMISSION
Scale looks on the outside, genuine Axial gears on the inside! The SCX10™ transmission received a design makeover with special attention paid towards aesthetics by mimicking a real transmission with a bell housing, oil pan and a 4X4 transfer case! And that’s just the beginning. By sitting the transfer case lower into the chassis and centering the driveshafts with the axle input housings, Axial has created a more efficient driveline with better driveshaft angles which puts less stress on moving parts. Better driveshaft angles coupled with hi-pinion axles IS scale realism backed with performance. Also includes full set of ball bearings and all metal internal gears for strength and durability.

• Transfer case design helps keep the driveshafts centered and as low as possible in the chassis
• Final drive ratio range 33.69 – 54.15 with available spur – pinion gear combinations
• Comes with 56T spur gear and 15T pinion / 32-pitch for durability
• All metal internal gears for strength and durability
• Final drive ratio (FDR) 40.44 with a range from 33.69 – 54.15 – Original SCX10 was 33.06
• Scale looks mimics a full size transmission and transfer case                                                                                  CHASSIS MOUNTED SERVO (CMS)
Scale matters, but so does geometry! In pursuit of scale looks, we’ve moved the servo off the top of the axle and onto the chassis, just as a full size truck has its steering box located on the frame. But with this seemingly simple action comes a complexity of suspension hurdles to overcome – one of which is bump steer. The undesirable steering is caused by bumps interacting with improper length or angle of suspension and steering links. We made it our mission to design the front suspension in such a way that it eliminates or comes as close as possible to zero bump steer, to help give you the best driving experience possible.

• Scale looks with proper suspension geometry
• Anodized aluminum links included w/ M4 rod ends
• Adjustable servo mounting system allows for a wide range of servos to be used
• Properly designed suspension for nearly zero bump steer                                                                                                                                                           ALL ALUMINUM SUSPENSION LINKS
The suspension geometry utilizes a 4-Link design for the rear which is optimized to reduce axle steer and torque twist. It also helps with steep off-camber climbs by having the proper amount of anti-squat and roll characteristics. The 4-Link system also aids against suspension wrap-up in high power applications.

• All links are metal including the steering
• Custom tapered center – flared ends design
• Large M4 rod ends
• Grey anodized aluminum                                                                                                                                              ADJUSTABLE WHEELBASE
This chassis is designed at 12.3” wheelbase length, but is easily adjusted to either a 11.4” or 12.0” wheelbase (optional link kits sold separately). Axial designed the chassis so that all the wheelbase adjustability happens out back without sacrificing front-end suspension geometry. Simple removal and installation of the suspension links and changing the drive shaft length allows an easier way to adjust the wheelbase.

• Wheelbase adjustment is easily done in the rear end without affecting the steering geometry and maintaining zero bump steer.
• Adjustable wheelbase (11.4”/ 12.0” / 12.3”) (optional link kits sold separately)
• 4 link rear
• 12.3” wheelbase

   STEEL C-CHANNEL FRAME RAIL CHASSIS
The realistic high strength c-channel chassis frame is made of durable steel with cross bracing for reinforcement and is held together with all hex hardware. Realistic looking frame and cross braces improve chassis rigidity (torsional stiffness). Realistic shock hoops with multiple shock mounting positions allows you to adjust your suspension for maximum performance. The simplified design makes maintenance and assembly quick and easy. The contoured skid plate significantly reduces hang-ups on terrain. Compared to the previous design, additional holes have been added to the rear portion of the frame rails for making wheelbase adjustments.                                                                                                     JCR OFFROAD VANGUARD BUMPERS
Scale front and rear bumpers licensed by JCR Offroad.

• Rear mount has been extended and stiffer plastics chosen to help limit the typical sag seen in plastic bumpers
• Lenses included for light locations on bumpers
• Rear tow hitch included for added scale appearance                                                                            ADJUSTABLE BATTERY TRAY
The new adjustable battery tray is now relocated lower and further forward for better weight distribution and center of gravity (COG).

• Adjustable tray that prevents the battery from coming loose or shifting while driving
• Posts are included to fine tune the fit based on the battery you choose
• Easy access for quicker battery changes
• Can accommodate batteries up to 32x44x147mm (3S 5,000 mAh)                                                                                                                  1.9 BFGOODRICH ALL-TERRAIN T/A® KO2 TIRES – R35
What lies between the dirt and metal are the tires – your connection to the trail below. When it comes to tough terrain, adventure seekers reach for BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A® KO2 tires for their dependability on the roughest backroads.

• Officially licensed by BFGoodrich
• 4.65” x 1.65” / 1.9 (118mm x 42.5mm)
• R35 compound

BFGoodrich® Tires and All-Terrain T/A® KO2 Trademarks are used under License from Michelin                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1.9 METHOD MESH WHEELS
In an industry that’s all about the latest and greatest, while taking advantage of styling trends, sometimes the ‘less is more’ approach is quite refreshing and the mesh wheel offers just that. Clean, simple and METHOD STRONG! These officially licensed METHOD Mesh Wheels are replicated in true form for durability and a clean line look.                              ICON ALUMINUM SHOCKS
Fully licensed Icon Vehicle Dynamics™ shocks feature clear coated polished aluminum bodies, complete with aluminum faux reservoirs. The main body of the shock is threaded for quick ride height adjustments and pre-load tuning ability. Like their full size counterparts these shocks are completely rebuildable, tunable and offer consistent handling all while adding some of that Icon bling to your SCX10™ chassis.

• 61-90mm Aluminum Shock Set with 7mm piston                                                                                                                                                    WATERPROOF RECEIVER BOX / ESC TRAY
Three different silicone seals are included, one for the antenna, one for the servo wires (includes three slots for three channels), and one that acts as a gasket for the receiver box cover. No more stress when running in mud, water, or snow!

• Waterproof receiver box located on the side plates allows easy access and low center of gravity
• Clean mounting surface for your ESC is large enough to accommodate up to 50x40mm footprint                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      WIRE ROUTING
Wire routing has been thoroughly thought through to help keep your chassis layout looking clean. In addition to including wire clips/guides, there has been a channel created that runs the length of the chassis so you can run additional wires hidden inside the c-channel frame.

• Optional mounting points and wire routing for a chassis mounted servo winch and 2 speed shift servo                                                                                                                                                                                                                      WB8 HD WILDBOAR™ DRIVESHAFTS
WB8 HD Wildboar™ front and rear driveshafts feature an updated design with a larger diameter cross pin (2x11mm) along with an M4 Screw Shaft (2mm hex drive) for added strength. A center splined slider floats between each end and features added material which reduces flex and fatigue.

• 3-piece driveshaft with strengthened slider-floater tube
• Increased surface at the connection between the ball joints and output shaft tubes
• 2x11mm cross pin adds 25% more surface area providing more strength for the ball joint
• Captured cross pin design eliminates older set screw design for more durability/easy maintenance
• Adjustable length driveline parts included in box                                                                                                                                                  DUAL SLIPPER CLUTCH
Our dual slipper design uses a pad on each side of the spur gear for added surface area. This allows for more precise tuning and holding power. The spur gear features strong, 32 pitch gearing for high torque applications.

• Slipper design uses a pad on each side of the spur gear for added surface contact area
• More precise tuning and holding power
• Strong 32P gear pitch for high torque applications                                                                               JEEP® XJ BODY
Throughout the rich history surrounding the Jeep® brand, there have been several influential vehicles hailing from the seven-slot stable, one of which is the Jeep® Cherokee (XJ). Possibly considered as the dawn of the modern SUV, the XJ was first presented 1984 as one of the first small SUV’s introduced into the American market, which carried on until 2001. During its 17yr production run, the XJ was built on several continents for world wide exposure, offered in either a 2-door or 4-door configuration, available in several different trim levels along with either a 2wd or 4wd drivetrain. Under the hood featured three different engine options consisting of 2.5L I4 AMC (125hp @ 5400rpm and 150lb/ft of torque @ 3250rpm), 4.0L I6 OHC AMC (193hp@4600rpm and 231lb/ft of torque @ 3000rpm), and a Euro spec only turbo diesel I4 OHV (114hp@3900rpm and 221 lb/ft @ 2000rpm). In 97’, the XJ received a facelift that updated design queues focused on aerodynamics, body stiffness, styling as well as the spare tire being relocated from the rear bumper to inside the cab. The stiffer uni-body construction brought forth improvements in noise cancellation and vibrations while aerodynamics improved engine efficiency.

From an off-roading perspective, the XJ has proven to be a relatively inexpensive vehicle for purchase thus making it a value based build option, capable of suiting just about any sort of budget. Its bones are strong thanks to a Quadra-Link suspension system and primarily coming with Dana 35 axles since the beginning, but there was a Dana 44 option between 87’-91’. Don’t let its smaller size fool you, there’s room for four passengers and space for days, making it a great expedition rig for friends and family to tag along.                 Credits: http://www.axialracing.com/
   

 

1/10 2.4Ghz Exceed RC Rally Monster Nitro Gas Powered RTR Off Road Rally Car 4WD Truck Carbon Orange

Exceed RC Rally Truck Radio Car 1/10 2.4Ghz Short Course Rally Monster .18 Engine 2-Speed Nitro Gas Powered RTR Ready to Run Off Road Rally Car 4WD Truck Stripe Blue RC Remote Control Car                                                                          car1

The heart of the Rally Monster Nitro truck line has always been a .18 engine with reliable and consistent power for tough off-road driving. With revised porting and crankshaft, internal airflow has been optimized for increased power and torque. With the new design 2.4Ghz remote control pistol transmitter is every RC Car Driver dream to get their hands on a full-range 2.4Ghz system.                                                                          car2

FEATURE HIGHLIGHTS:

RTR 100% factory assembled with installed engine and radio gear makes getting started easy The 2.5mm lightweight aluminum alloy chassis provides excellent performance and durability
New lightweight suspension arms deliver quick suspension response and reduce the critical sprung weight and overall weight of the car Oil filled shocks with firm tuned springs keep the wheels on the ground
The new .18 engine features a new crankcase and upgrades to the cylinder, piston, connecting rod and crankshaft, delivers more power, more torque and extra cooling                                      car5

2-Speed transmission for fast acceleration and insane top end speed High capacity fuel tank with perfect caliber makes it impossible to overflow and provides long run times

car4                car11

Excellent differential system design provides quick access to the front or rear differential by removing only few screws. You can now access the front and rear differential for easy maintenance


High capacity fuel tank with perfect caliber makes it impossible to overflow and provides long run times

http://    http://

Short Course Racing Tips—5 Tips For Faster Laps

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Anyone with any racing experience will tell you that jumping from class to class isn’t as easy as just selecting a new model on your transmitter and picking up a new truck. And, many people think that because the scale appeal of short course attracts so many newcomers to the hobby that the class is for beginners and thus easy. The point is that short course racing takes just as much skill as any other class and even experienced racers can have a hard time adapting and succeeding. If you want to run at the front of the pack, check out these five tips:

 

1. Momentum

Racing is all about going fast, right? Well, if you’re constantly flying into corners, spraying dirt everywhere and ripping down the straights, you’re doing it wrong. You might feel like you’re going really fast and that may work to some degree with an overpowered truggy, but it’s the slow way to get a short course truck around the track. This is especially true if you’re in the 17.5-turn class. You can get away with a little bit of a heavy-handed driving style with 4WD class short course truck, but it is essential that you drive smoothly.  You should drive like you have an egg strapped to your truck. Drive smoothly and try to keep your truck always rolling.

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2. Stay Out of Trouble

I lot of people think short course is the class where it’s OK to beat and bash. Let them think that and let them smash into each other. Just keep your distance and let the action unfold—don’t be a part of it. You’ll lose far less time by slightly hanging back in comparison to getting involved in a wreck. Think about the time you lose when you crash and then have to wait for a corner marshal as compared to when you just ease back a bit and wait for the right time to make a move. We’re talking the difference between ten seconds and a tenth of a second or maybe the difference between first and third.                                             car32

3. Passing vs. Catching

There’s a difference? There very much is a difference between catching someone and passing them, but you’d never know it watching the typical RC race. Most racers just race as fast as they can try to get around people as they catch them. It sounds good, but catching and passing are simply two different acts. When you catch someone think about whether you’re at a good place to pass. Some slow cars can be blown by down the straight, but keep in mind that a phenomenon called target fixation almost always occurs when you try to pass someone on the straight. They focus on your car and essentially subconsciously drive right into. It looks like they’re trying to squeeze you off the straight, but usually it’s just an unintended rookie type mistake. The point is it’s almost always better to pass in corners. Drivers of equal ability will take some work (that’s what makes racing fun), but there is usually a corner or two they go wide on and most newer drivers are usually easy to pass on the corner going into the main straight as the almost always fly in wide and get back on the gas too soon. Just slow to the inside and out accelerate the on exit.                                                                                                                                                  car30

4. Like a Sports Car

Short course trucks are just like sports cars. Makes perfectly good sense…if you have experience with the racing of full-size cars—either as a driver or an entrenched fan. You see, sports car or road course racers know that you brake in straight lines and accelerate in corners. This is the foundation of proper performance driving. You should be 100% done slowing down before you get to a corner and you should be accelerating through and out of the corner.                                                                                                         car33

5. Practice Smart

There may be no such thing as bad practice, but some practice is definitely better than others. Most racers get their practice in by showing up early on race day. They’ll get there hours before they really need to and then spend most of that time shooting the bull with the other “diehards” that show up at the crack of dawn. When the early birds do hit the track it’s on a dry track that is nothing like the one they’ll race on. Experimenting with tires and setup at this stage is completely pointless as while that practice is valuable, the track is simply nowhere near race shape. It’s far better to stay late and drive on the track after racing has concluded. Check with the race director first, but most don’t mind and you’ll be running on a track in is much closer to race condition. This is the time to try every tire combo you can think of and mess with your shocks.                                                                                                                                         car34                                                                                                             Credits:  http://rctruckstop.com/   http://

 

Detailed RC Loaders, Cranes And Trucks Move Dirt In Their Own Mini World at Intermat (VIDEO)

Throughout the Intermat trade show in Paris , the first pieces of yellow iron attendees saw as they entered the earthmoving pavilion were a bit on the small side. Situated just before the entrance of Hall 5 was a whole city of where remote-controlled scale model construction equipment were free to move and haul to their hearts’ content. We’ve put together a gallery of the mini machines above. The loaders and cranes were especially impressive in person. And in the video below, you can check out a few of the machines in action. And be sure to stick around for the “Final Countdown” at the end. equip1 equip2 equip3 equip4 equip5 equip6 eqip7 equip8 equip9 equip10 equip11 equip12equip13 equip14 

Credits: http://www.equipmentworld.com/    

RC General Buying Decisions

veh1Radio controlled vehicles/craft can be fairly cleanly divided into two categories, toy and hobby-level. The toy type are what most people think of when you mention “RC” — buy-and-drive playthings that you can purchase from a toy or electronics store. These are made strictly for the sake of fun. Then there are the more sophisticated and capable models targeted towards hobbyists who want to go faster, tinker with settings and upgrades, and perhaps participate in one of the many levels of established competitive events. Neither class of RC is necessarily “better” — they each have their positive and negative qualities. However, when you’re first starting out, it’s very worthwhile to choose which way you want to go up front, long before you pull out your credit card. This article presents the most important facts that can help you make an informed decision.                                                                                                                                            

Cost

Toy R/C cars & trucks that you can buy at places like Toys R Us or Walmart start at $20-25 USD, and the most extreme ones top out around $150. Toy R/C planes start at around $30. When you step up to the hobby level, you’ll be hard pressed to find something complete for under $130. It’s very easy to spend $400-500 on a 1/10th scale car or truck that will last awhile, and a fully upgraded rig can easily shoot up to $2,000-3,000 USD.

Speed

In most cases, there’s really no comparison between the performance of toy and hobby-level RCs. Most toy cars & trucks will go anywhere from 5mph to 15mph, with the fastest few doing 20-24mph. Hobby-level RCs generally start at 15-25mph for electrics and 25-35mph for nitro versions. You can get monster trucks that will do over 40mph out of the box, and low-slung street cars that will do over 60 with no upgrades or modifications. In planes, the toys generally go around 5-15mph, while there are hobby-class craft that will do 30, 50, even 80mph in factory stock form. The most extreme speed differences are in boats. The toys often putt and crawl along at 1-5mph, while the hottest hobby-level racing boats will skim the surface at over 100mph

Durability

Mostly because they’re slow, toy RCs tend to handle more abuse than their more expensive cousins. The most common things to break are bumpers and body trim. The land and water-borne vehicles are built with a lot more material than is necessary, while aircraft tend to be constructed of foam and flexible plastics that bounce back after being bent. However…

When they break…

Repairing a toy RC is sometimes not worth the time & effort. Nearly all use multifunction circuit boards that combine several major functions, so if something goes electrically wrong, you have to change out the whole thing. Most manufacturers don’t have a factory service program, so you have to do the work yourself. Many don’t even offer a way to order new parts. Nikko is a notable exception. You can call them, tell them exactly what vehicle you have, describe the problem, and order precisely the part(s) you need. Many RC’s available at Radio Shack are actually from Nikko and are covered by this same level of support, with the additional convenience of being able to go back to the store and special-order your parts in person.

Fixing hobby-level RCs is, in most cases, a completely different affair. You can disassemble anything yourself. With most popular brands there are manuals and exploded views. There are service departments that handle returns of defective components. Electronics are, with rare exception, separated by function so that you don’t have to change your speed controller if your radio receiver crystal goes bad. Parts are available at brick-and-mortar hobby shops and dozens of trusted, popular web sites. There are online forums (message boards) where you can ask other hobbyists for advice and learn from their experience. veh2

Upgradability

These days, ever more toy RCs have upgrades available for purchase from the original manufacturer, particularly amongst the smaller “micro” cars and trucks. These upgrades can range from different body kits to stickier tires to faster motors. They’re generally very easy to install, requiring at most a small screwdriver (which is often included) and 15 minutes, and can dramatically change the look or performance of the vehicle. They’re also great fun to install and let the owner add a bit of their own personality.

The most popular hobby RCs may have literally hundreds of upgrades available from many different aftermarket sources (companies other than the original manufacturer). Among the available upgrades may be anything from scale-realistic wheels to anodized aluminum struts in various colors to larger motors/engines to total conversion kits that fundamentally change the vehicle. Many hobby-level RC parts are reusable from one vehicle to another, especially electronic components and motors/engines. Popular RC models come with the support of other owners nationwide or around the world who share their experiences, tips, and home-grown modifications freely on the Internet.

Controllability

Toy radio systems traditionally give you forward/reverse (or up/down) and left/right direction control. A growing number of cars & trucks these days now have “digital proportional” steering to boot, which gives you a number of steps between neutral and full turning, depending upon how far you turn the wheel or push the stick on the radio transmitter. Some, though, only let you go straight forward or to turn one pre-set direction in reverse. Toy helicopters are what you have to watch out for the most, as these sometimes give you only one axis of control — go straight up, or come straight down. Most toy RC’s are still only available on two frequencies (e.g., 27mhz and 49mhz in the US), with a few now offering 3 to 6 possibilities. This limits the number of vehicles that can run at one time, but more unfortunately it reduces the possibility of even being able to run two random vehicles together.

Hobby-class radio systems give you 64 to 256 (or more) steps of control in each direction for what feels like perfectly smooth turning & throttle control. These systems can also be easily changed between anywhere from 6 to 30 different frequencies, so even if the one person you want to race against or fly with has an absolutely identical radio setup, for around $20 and with a one-minute part swap, you’re both in the clear. Still better, the most recent generation of radio systems, while expensive, operate on an extremely high frequency and use small computer chips to automatically search for and lock onto an open channel, ensuring that you’ll never have a frequency conflict.

Raceability

Toy RCs can be raced between siblings or friends around the neighborhood, but there’s generally no sanctioned racing. Hobby-level RCs are raced around the world in local, regional, national, and even international events, even including multi-track tours.

Ownership

When all is said and done, the purchase decision between toy & hobby-level RCs should always come down to who the purchase is being made for. You don’t want to buy a $390, 45mph nitro-powered car for a 6-year-old. Likewise, a 16-year-old who wants to get into RC racing for sport wouldn’t be well-served by a $39 toy. What’s really interesting is the 26-year-old with a $25 micro-sized monster truck who would derive hours of fun from chasing his/her cat around the kitchen floor or gingerly driving around a makeshift desktop obstacle course during lunchtime at work. Before you buy an RC, know who you’re buying it for and do a little research. That extra time spent up front could make the difference between tremendous fun and awkward disappointment. Credits: http://www.beginningrc.com/ http://

Owning And Operating A Nitro Powered Radio Controlled Car Or Truck

Nitro RC Cars

by :nitro1Owning and operating a nitro powered radio controlled car or truck adds an element of excitement and realism to this hobby above and beyond that provided by the electric RC counterparts. Unfortunately, it also poses some unique challenges. The one question that is posed to me the most often is ‘how do I start a gas powered RC car’?

Well, first of all, you need to assemble a few necessary items. These can be obtained either individually, or purchased as a package with or without your radio controlled car or truck. You will need the correct nitro fuel, a glow igniter, batteries for your radio transmitter and receiver, and a small screwdriver.

Have your glow igniter fully charged and ready to use. Make sure you have installed batteries in your controller (transmitter) and the car’s on board receiver. Verify that they are functioning properly by operating the steering, throttle and brake. After all, you want to be able to control your RC car once it is running! Fill the car’s fuel tank with the proper nitro fuel. Be careful  fuel is extremely flammable and toxic! Check with your engine’s manufacturer or your local hobby shop to make sure you are using the recommended nitro mix. 20% is the most popular. OK? Now we are ready to fire her up.

Clip the glow igniter to the glow plug located in the top of the engine cylinder head. Rotate the engine by whatever means your car or truck uses such as manual pull recoil, on board electric starter, drill operated shaft starter, or portable starter box. You may have to ‘choke’ the engine to initially supply fuel to the carburetor. You can easily do this by placing a finger over the exhaust outlet. Watch for fuel movement through the fuel hose so you know when fuel has reached the carburetor. You don’t want to flood the engine!

Once the engine has started and is running smoothly, you can remove the glow igniter. Drive easy for a few minutes until the engine warms up a little. After warm up you may find it necessary to adjust the carburetor high speed needle, low speed needle, or idle speed set screw to maximize performance.

This might all seem intimidating to you, but it really isn’t hard to learn with a little practice and patience. The sound of that high performance nitro engine springing to life makes it well worth the effort!
sources www.hobbiedown.com and actionvillage.com

Step 1: how to drive you Gas RC car.                                                   nitro2nitro3                      I no most people think its easy to drive but most do not.
Step1
Realize that your controller works just like the steering wheel on your regular car. When you move it to the left, your RC car moves to the left and when you push the controller to the right, your car moves to the right.
Step2
Drive as fast as you can the first few times you take your RC car onto a new track. This will help you get a feel for the track without worrying too much about making a mistake.
Step3
Stick to the middle of the track instead of trying to hug the edges. Your lap times might not be as good, but at least you won’t drive your RC car right into one of the track barriers.
Step4
Look for lines or the areas of the track where more experienced racers drive their cars. This should give you an idea on how to lower your lap times.
Step5
Draft with other cars just as you would if you were racing NASCAR instead of driving an RC car. Not only can you increase your speed, but you can also see where other cars are running and what spots drivers are avoiding.
Step6
Be consistent any time you drive your RC car. The more time you spend racing and practicing, the better you’ll get.
ive but most dont.

Step 2: gas rc car safey                                                                              nitro4nitro5nitro6Safety Issues and Rules for Responsible RC Car & Truck Operation
Be a safe, courteous, and responsible RC car or truck owner and operator. Protect yourself, those around you, and your RC vehicles by using common sense and following certain guidelines for safe use of radio controlled cars, trucks, motorcycles, tanks, bulldozers, and other RC ground vehicles.
Control Your Controller
Before you run your RC: Controller on first, vehicle on second. After you run your RC: Vehicle off first, controller off second.
Choose a Safe Area to Operate Your RC
Choose a safe, open area to operate your radio controlled vehicle. Avoid people and busy streets.
Check Your Frequency
Check your frequency and make sure no one in your operating area is using the same frequency at the same time you are.
Check for Obstacles Before Operating Your RC
Survey the area that you will be driving in and make sure it is clear of undesired obstacles… i.e. stumps, large rocks, puddles of water, or other obstructions.
Avoid Spinning Wheels
Do not pick up your vehicle while the tires are still moving.
Handle and Store Nitro Fuel Safely
Nitro fuel is highly flammable. Avoid open flames — including smoking — around nitro containers. Mark your container for identification.

Step 3: Nitro RC Operation And Maintenance                               nitro7Nitro RC Operation and Maintenance
A nitro RC has many more parts than most electrics. There are also specific operational and maintenance requirements from engine tuning, to break-in, to after-run maintenance. Learn how to keep your nitro RC glow engine at peak performance levels. And when your nitro engine won’t run, do some troubleshooting to isolate and fix the problem.
Nitro Troubleshooting @
Nitro Engine Break-in Procedure
Proper nitro engine break-in is critical for long-lasting performance of your RC. Every new nitro engine should undergo a break-in procedure. If you do nitro engine break-in properly, the up-keep on your RC vehicle is less costly than if the procedure is done hastly and incorrectly. Be patient.
Adding After-Burn Oil
After running your RC for a while you have to perform after-run maintenance. Part of that after-run maintenance includes lubricating the pistons and all the internal parts by adding after-burn oil to the engine cylinder head.

Step 4: Carb ajusting.nitro9nitro8                  How does the carburetor work and how do I adjust it?

We got the theory part of the engine under control. We can’t really tune a piston or adjust a crank-shaft, at least not in your every-day engine maintenance and adjustment. So without further delays lets dive into the 2nd phase of this project& The Carburetor. What good is a 1.2 HP engine if you can’t keep the dam thing running? That’s exactly my point, it does not matter how little horse power your engine has, if it can stay running for the entire duration of the main then you will have a real good change to at least get one of the top three positions. They say that before you can win a race -first you must finish. The first part of finishing a race it to have a well tuned engine. In this article we will go over how a carburetor works and how to adjust it. Without any further delays lets get busy!

Carburetor Theory

The carburetor has one main function, to regulate engine speed. It accomplishes this by metering the amount of air and fuel as required, to sustain combustion per the input of the throttle servo. Thus for a low-speed idle you would have a small amount of air and fuel entering the engine. This would in effect lower the chemical energy entering the combustion chamber and thus lessen engine power and subsequently lower the RPM. As we open the throttle the carb will allow more air and fuel into the combustion chamber, thus increasing engine power and RPM’s (revolutions per minute). Now that we know what the carb. has to do lets explore the underlining fluid mechanic properties that allow the carb to function effectively at different throttle settings.

The Venturi-Effect

What allows the carb to pull fuel from the fuel tank is the venturi-effect. This states that in a converging funnel the entering fluid velocity increases as it passes through a reduction in the funnels throat diameter. This increase in fluid velocity decreases the localized pressure at the venturi throat to below atmospheric pressure. This low pressure region is precisely where fuel enters the carburetor throat. This is what allows the engine to “suck” fuel from the gas tank. The truth is that the venturi-effect is all that is needed for the engine to get fuel. Pressurizing the fuel tank is really only done to decrease the effects of fuel level on the mixture setting of the carburetor.

Fuel Metering Devices

The venturi-effect draws fuel from the tank but does little to regulate it’s flow. It’s true that as the engine accelerates the amount of air that moves through the engine increases. The increase in air velocity also increases fuel flow into the induction port, this helps the engine self regulate the fuel up to a certain point.

This is not the only means for the carburetor to meter air and fuel. Engines need a metering device to help regulate the amount of fuel that enters the carburetor. This is accomplished with an adjustable orifice, typically we call them needles or jets. Most engines have a second adjustable needle that helps regulate fuel at low throttle settings. By adjusting these two needles we can control the transition from low to high speed operation of the engine.

How do we adjust a carburetor?

The carburetor is typically adjusted with a long flat-head screw-driver. Carb adjustments are then done by rotating the needled in, our out of the needle seat. The idle speed is adjusted by a screw at the base of the carburetor. This allows the throttle barrel to only close to a preset position.

The carb has three main adjustments that allow you to set the following:

1. Set the idle speed.

2. Set the mixture at idle (Adjustable on 2-needle carbs only).

3. Set the high speed needle mixture and control engine temp

How to make carburetion adjustments:

Idle Speed:

The throttle stop screw or idle-speed screw (same thing) determines how far the carb barrel will be able to close when the servo is in the neutral position. Typically you set the servo/throttle linkage so that the carb will go from fully open when the trigger is fully pressed to fully closed when the trigger is in neutral. Then you would adjust the idle-stop/speed screw so that there is a 1-2 mm gap when the servo is in the neutral position. You might need to readjust the spring collars on the throttle linkage to force the throttle arm against the idle speed screw.

Tip#1: If you completely mess up the carb setting and you want to go back to the factory recommended needle setting then you must have the carb fully (Yes I mean fully closed) before you can set the low-speed needle to whatever turns the engine manufacturer suggests. Before you close the carb fully back the low-speed needle a bit to make sure you wont put un-needed stress on the needle seat.

Tip#2: There should be no speed change whatsoever when the car is in idle and when you hit the brakes. If the engine’s RPM drop either your linkage isn’t set right or the idle-speed screw is set too loose. Tighten clockwise until the carb barrel doesn’t move when you go from neutral to full brakes.

Tip#3: Some RTR kits have servo horns that are too small. There is not enough servo throw to open the carb barrel, if you use servo trim to be able to open the carb fully, then when you go to neutral the carb doesn’t close enough. To compensate for this the novice engine tuner opens up the low speed needle to drop the engine RPM so the car will stay still when at idle… The drawbacks of correcting the linkage problem with the mixture control is that now the low-speed is too rich and the car won’t idle for more than a couple of seconds before the engine sputters and dies.

To fix this problem you need to get an after market servo horn that is larger yet still fits your particular servo brand. Now you can go from fully open to fully closed, without using trim. Now you wont have to compromise the carb settings because of lack of servo throw.

Low-Speed Needle:

At this point you would start the engine warm it up and commence tuning. Adjust the low-speed needle clock-wise until the engine doesn’t sputter when at idle. You want a fast idle, if the car wants to move forward a lot, then turn the idle-speed screw counter clock wise to lower RPM until the engine just barely want to engage the clutch. It may take a little time to get the settings right.

Remember you want the fastest idle you can get away with. It will make the engine more stall proof. Some engine will overheat if the idle isn’t rich enough, you need to experiment to determine what’s the right setting for your particular engine. When every thing is set right the engine will be able to idle through an entire tank without missing a beat.

High-Speed Needle:

The high speed needle will control fuel flow into the carb from 1/2 to full throttle. Typically the high speed needle is set to allow the engine to reach it’s peak power point, then you open the needle slightly and go racing. On very hot and humid days you will probably have to make a compromise in the tuning department. For most this will mean you will richen up the high-speed needle to lower engine temperatures to acceptable levels. Everyone has their own interpretation of what an acceptable engine temperature is, for me anything under 260 is acceptable. Going higher will typically mean shorter engine life-span and less reliability.

Step 5: Glow Engine tuning basics                                                      nitro10nitro11                        Understanding Your Engine
The first and foremost consideration when attempting to tune your glow engine is understanding the basic parts and their functions. By understanding the fundamentals, you can better tune your engine for maximum performance while at the same time, expanding the life of your engine.

Carburetor
The carburetor is the mechanism that mixes fuel and air in very specific proportions and passes it on to the engine through the vacuum intake. The natural operation of the engines causes of flow of gases to pass through the engine (through the carburetor) and out the exhaust manifold and on to the pipe or muffler. The exact mechanism for this is unimportant for the scope of this tutorial, however it is important to realize that air and fuel pass into the engine by this vacuum method. Depending on how you adjust your carburetor, you can either adjust how much of this gas/air mixture reaches the engine and to what proportion of gas to air passes on to the engine. By reducing the amount of fuel per volume of air, you are making the mixture “lean” and by increasing the amount of fuel, you are making the mixture “rich”.

The two types of carburetors are slide and barrel. The old-style barrel carburetors still dominate the market because of their simplicity in design and because of the tendency for designers to hang on to legacy design. These have been around since the beginning of glow-fuel planes. They control gas/air flow by rotating a barrel with a hole cut in either side that allows varying amounts of gas/air mixture to flow through the carburetor as the hole opening enlarges to the venturi (air shaft down the center of the carb body).

Idle-Speed Adjustment
This is the most basic and easy to understand part of tuning your carburetor. This spring-tensioned screw limits the closure of the barrel aperture. Although this doesn’t affect the mixture of the fuel it does affect the idle speed. The more closed the aperture is, the slower the idle, the larger the aperture, the faster. As you close this aperture up and the idle speed decreases, you will eventually (sooner than later) stall the engine out. In order for the engine to run, it must have enough inertial energy built up in the engine and flywheel to carry it through the entire ignition cycle. Generally speaking, you want to adjust this down to the slowest idle, just before it begins to stall.

Low-End Mixture Adjustment
This adjusts the fuel mixture at or near idle. Some engines lack this low-end mixture valve for reasons of simplicity, however this makes accurate tuning difficult.

For barrel carbs, this mixture valve is generally found where the throttle-arm pivots. Some are countersunk, others are clearly visible from the outside. On slide carbs, they are generally found on the opposite side of the carb from the throttle slide shaft (has an accordion billow type rubber boot over it) next to, but below the fuel-inlet and high-end mixture valve.

High-End Mixture Adjustment
Also known as the Main Needle adjustment, this is the primary fuel mixture adjustment. This is generally found on the top end of the engine, typically next to where the fuel line goes into the engine. Some are flat-head screws like the low-end mixture, others are hand adjustable valves.

Tuning Basics

It’s important to understand that there is a reputation for glow-engines to be difficult to tune. This is a common error in thinking. With a little bit of know-how, tuning a glow engine can really be a simple, pain-free process. People that don’t properly understand the basics can easily become frustrated by what should be a simple, straightforward process. Here’s how you do it:

Dialing it In
For the purpose of this tutorial we are going to make some basic assumptions. First, we’re going to assume that the rest of your car or truck is properly functioning and that you have everything ready to go. Second, we’re going to assume that you are able to start your engine and that it at least runs for a second or so.

The first place to start with dialing in your engine is to make sure that you have your idle-speed properly adjusted. Your engine manual should give you specific instructions on setting the aperture gap to the minimum size. It’s important that we get this resolved before continuing on. If your engine can’t get enough air/gas flow then it won’t start/run. A clockwise rotation opens the aperture and increases the idle RPMs, a counterclockwise slows it down.

Second, you should tune the low-end mixture valve. This is done before the high-end (main needle) adjustment because an improperly adjusted low-end can affect the high-end performance. Like most mixture valves, clockwise rotation will “lean” the mixture and a counterclockwise will “richen” the mixture.

To determine whether the low-end mixture requires tuning, allow the engine to warm up completely, and then allow it to idle, uninterrupted for one full minute. If the engine continues to run after the minute is up then your low-end mixture is correct and you’re ready for the high-end adjustment. If it dies on you then there are two possibilities; either you are running too rich or too lean. To determine which is the case you must listen for how the engine dies in its idle test.

If the engine’s RPM’s rev up at the last second and then the engine dies than you are running too lean. To correct this, turn the low-end mixture screw counterclockwise (out) 1/8 of a turn (always make adjustments in 1/8 turn) and retry the idle test.

If, on the other hand, it begins to wind down and you notice a change in how the exhaust sounds in the last few seconds, then your engine is running too rich. To correct this, turn the low-end mixture screw clockwise (in) 1/8 of a turn and then retry the idle test.

Once you have passed the idle test and are able to idle for one full minute (after first warming the engine up, of course) you are ready to continue on. You may have to repeat the above process a few times until it is properly set. Remember, only adjust the screw 1/8 of a turn. It’s far too easy to go too far with the adjustment. Setting changes don’t always take effect immediately. You may have to run your engine for a few minutes for the full effect to take place.

Now that you have dialed in your low end, any carb mixture problems can be isolated to the high-end (main) mixture adjustment.

Acceleration is the tell-tale sign of how to tune your high end. If you hit the throttle and it takes off suddenly but then suddenly dies or loses power then you have your main mixture set too lean. Try backing (counterclockwise) the main mixture needle out 1/8 of a turn and retry. If it bogs immediately when you hit the throttle (sounds like it’s choking), then it’s most likely running too rich. Try leaning the mixture out by screwing the main mixture valve in (clockwise) 1/8 of a turn.

The more accurate way of really dialing in the top-end is to take the engine’s temperature. A properly tuned engine should run between 210� and 220� Fahrenheit. This can only really be ascertained by using and infra-red thermometer such as the type used by automotive mechanics. On-board or direct-transfer types that measure the heat from the head are inaccurate because, assuming the head is properly dissipating heat, it would reflect a lower than accurate temperature as a majority of the heat energy would be dissipated from the exposed surface of the head. By “looking” at the temperature near the core (actually, area immediately surrounding the glow plug) the temperature can be more accurately read.

The cheap but easy alternative would be to drop a bead of water down the head on the glow-plug and see whether it boils off. If it slowly simmers than it probably is running right around 212�. If it boils to quickly then it’s probably too lean and needs to be richened. If it just sits there and doesn’t boil at all, then its running too rich and needs to be leaned out.

An engine that is running too lean will run hotter and exceed the 220� degree limit. This can significantly reduce the life of your engine. Although it may be tempting to run your engine as lean as possible (does give a short-lived performance boost), this should only be done if you are very wealthy and like swapping engines out every race. There is no quicker way to kill and engine, honest. This is simply because as you lean the engine out, it gets less fuel to the engine, and more importantly, less lubricant. Since glow fuel is the only means of lubrication for your engine, the lack of it means certain death to your powerplant.

A few final do’s and don’ts…

    • Give your adjustments time to take affect. Remember that most adjustments won’t be immediately noticeable. You need to drive your engine through it’s full range for at least a minute. Make sure you make adjustments in 1/8 turn adjustments only!
    • Always run on the rich side. It’s far better to take a slight performance hit than to turn your engine into a paper weight. Running too lean may give you a temporary thrill, but it’s short lived. Your engine must get the proper amount of lubrication at all times.
    • Changes in temperature affect your tuning! Whenever the outside temperature changes you will most likely need to re-adjust your engine. Warmer temperatures require a leaner setting where colder temperatures require a richer setting.

 

I hope that this info gets you on the right track. If all fails, it’s always a good idea to get expert advice from the vets down at your local track. However, be aware of the guy that’s too eager to give you advice on how to get that extra performance boost out of your engine. Unless he or she plans on buying your next engine, I would be weary of any such advice.

Good luck!

Step 6: Engine Maintenance.                                                                nitro10nitro11                         day-to-Day Maintenance

There are three basic steps one should take on a day-to-day basis to ensure you continue getting the most from your engine:

1. Keep your engine clean on both the inside and outside. By keeping pariticles of dirt out of the workings of your engine, the operating surfaces will remain smooth and therefore less wear and better performance will result. Always use a fuel filter between your tank and the engine to catch any particles in the fuel. When operating in dusty conditions, use an air filter on your carb to keep particles out of your air intake. When done for the day, use a motor spray to clean off the dirt from the outside of the engine, especially the carb and linkages.

2. Use an after run at the end of the day. Since fuel contains elements that are hydroscopic (they abosrb water), any fuel left in an engine will attract moisture and therefore contribute to rust. It is important that you run the engine dry after your last flight or run to remove the last of the raw fuel. This can be done by simply pulling the fuel line from the engine and letting the engine run out. Apply several drops of after run oil into your carb and turn the engine over to ensure the oil gets distributed throughout the inner workings, coating the metal and protecting it from rust.

3. Ensure all of your nuts and bolts are tight. Between flying or running sessions, check that all of your bolts, such as the head bolts, backplate bolts, muffler bolts, engine mounting bolts, and carb mounting screws, are tight. Also, check that prop nut to ensure you won’t be launching a spinning prop on your next flight. An over revved engine, particularly a four stroke, can cause damage without the load of a prop or flywheel.

End of Season Maintenance

When the flying season is over, a small amount of engine care can ensure a successful beginning to the following season.

Clean Engine with Motor SprayRemove your engine from the model and give it a visual checkessentially perform the same checks you would do at the end of a day. Make sure that all bolts are in place and tight. It is not necessary to disassemble the engine unless you feel that there is internal damage or that the bearings require replacing. Replace any stripped bolts or rough running bearings. Clean the entire engine with motor spray to remove all dirt. Finally, load up the engine with after run oil, turning it over to ensure that all moving internal parts are covered. This will go a long way to reducing the chance of your engine rusting in the off season. Store the engine in a baggie to keep the dirt out and the oil in!
Beginning of the Season

The first thing to do before re-installing your engine is to replace the plumbing in your model. Remove the fuel tank and take out the rubber stopper and all brass and silicone tubing. There are components in the fuel that break down brass over time and if left, the tubing will eventually crumble or at the least allow air to enter the line. Clean the residue from the tank itself with a bit of isopropyl alcohol and then install a new rubber stopper assembly with new brass and silicone tubing. Reinstall your tank.

Take your engine from its baggie and use spray motor cleaner to get the after run off the outside of the casing. Re-install your engine to the model. When you are ready to run your engine, remove the glow plug and flush fresh fuel through the engine, turning it over with your thumb over the carb. This will clear out the storage oil. Replace the plug and start your engine as normal. http://  http://Amazon.com – Read eBooks using the FREE Kindle Reading App on Most Devices

Off-Road RC Car Tuning Guide

Need More Steering?
• Batteries – Move batteries towards the front of the vehicle.
• Front Shock Mounting – Move the lower shock mount towards the outside
• Front Camber Link – Longer camber links increase steering
• Front Ride Height – Lower the front ride height
• Rear Ride Height – Raise rear ride height for more high speed steering
• Rear Shock Mounting – Move upper mount towards outside
• Wheelbase – Lengthen the wheelbase for more steering
• Rear Toe-in – Decrease rear toe-in
• Ackerman – Use less Ackerman for more sensitive steering                                                                               offroad1                                                                                                             Need More Traction?
• Batteries – Move batteries towards the rear of the vehicle
• Rear Ride Height – Lower rear ride height
• Rear Camber – Less camber (0 -1 deg.)
• Camber Link – Longer camber links
• Rear Shock Mounting – Move upper mount towards the inside
• Wheelbase – Shorten the wheelbase
• Rear Toe-in – Increase rear toe-in
• Slipper – Loosen slipper so wheels don’t spin as much                                                                                             offroad2                                                                                                                 Need Better Jumping?
• Shock Oil – If bouncing too much or bottoms out over jumps, use heavier oil
• Shock Pistons – If bottoming out over jumps, use smaller hole pistons
• Rear Shock Mounting – If bottoming out over jumps move upper mount towards he outside
• Battery Position – If nose high during jumps, move battery forward, move rearward if nose is down during jumps
• Weight – Add weight to nose if it’s too high during jumps                                                                                     offroad3                                                                                                                              Need More High Speed Steering?
• Front Toe – More toe-in gives you more steering coming out of the corners
• Front Caster – Less caster gives you more steering exiting corners
• Rear Ride Height – Raise rear ride height for more high speed steering                                                            offroad4                                                                                                                    More Stable Over Rough Tracks?
• Anti-squat – Less anti-squat allows better acceleration on rough tracks
• Rear Camber – More negative camber is more stable on bumpy tracks
• Rear Camber Link – Shorter camber links is more stable on bumpy tracks
• Front Shock Mounting – Move lower shock mount inside for bumpy tracks
• Battery Mounting – Place in the middle for most stable on all tracks                                                                 offroad5                                                                                                                   Credits: rcracingusa.net  http://     

Water Drop Effect — Proline How to Paint series

paint1paint2paint3paint4paint5

 

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RC Cars Suspension Tuning

– Basic Suspension Tuning –

With Mark Pavidis suspension1http:// Mark Pavidis is old school. He’s been making A-mains at big races since some of today’s younger pro racers were in diapers. He has raced for some of the biggest companies in our industry, and has helped developed some of the most influential chassis, tire, and component designs in the RC world. Mark has been competitive at the top levels of RC racing longer than anyone from any part of the world, and many racers from any generation regard him as one of the toughest competitors they’ve ever faced.

He has won U.S. National championships in several classes, including 1/8-Scale Buggy. Along with Japanese legend Masami Hirosaka, Mark is the only other driver to win IFMAR World titles in both on-road and off-road competition. Unlike Masami, or any other driver, Mark is the only driver ever to win IFMAR World championships in both electric and nitro competitions. His 2006 IFMAR 1/8-Scale Off-Road title reaffirmed his place in RC history as one of the best racers of all time.

I sat down with Mark at AKA’s new offices in Murrieta, California, to discuss the most common adjustments available on today’s nitro buggies. When Mark Pavidis talks buggy setup, we listen.  suspension2  CAMBER
Camber is the relationship of the tire to the ground, such that a tire that is perpendicular to the racing surface has zero camber. If the top of the tire leans in toward the car, it has negative camber; likewise, a tire that leans outward at the top has positive camber.

Front Camber. Adding more negative camber to the front of your buggy will make your car less aggressive, especially when turning into the corner. More negative camber will also lessen the chances that the front tires will catch on ruts or bumps. Mark says, “On rough or high speed tracks, adding more negative camber is an important adjustment to make.” It’s usually best to start with a little bit of negative camber in the front.

Taking away negative camber (or even adding positive camber) to the front of your buggy takes away a little bit of overall steering, but will make your buggy steer into the corner more aggressively since the corner of the tire will dig into the track’s surface. This can help on slower tracks with plenty of high-speed corners.

Rear Camber. More negative camber in the rear tires will free up the rear of the car, making it whip around by taking away lateral traction. As with the front of the car, more negative camber will help your buggy navigate through rough sections of the track.

Running less negative camber in the rear will take away a little bit of overall steering, but your buggy will handle more responsively. If the track is not bumpy and has good traction, try running less negative camber to help carry more speed through corners.     suspension3 CAMBER LINK POSITIONS
The optional camber link mounting holes alter the rate at which the camber angle changes throughout the suspension’s movement. For the purposes of making only the following changes, you should reset your camber angles after moving the camber link locations.

Front
Outside (on the front hub).
A longer link means the camber will change less as the suspension compresses, which will make the car turn in harder but push exiting the corner.
Moving to the inside hole will give more camber rise, which smooths out initial turn-in but adds steering through the middle and exit of the corner.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Raising the inner mount will keep the front end more flat. On high bite and smooth track, this will smooth out your car’s steering response and make it easier to drive.
Lowering the inner mount will add body roll and make the car more aggressive. Mark almost always runs the lowest hole available.

Rear
Outside (on the rear hub).
A longer link gives less camber rise, which means less traction. On a high speed track with high grip, this will add more support by eliminating body roll.
A shorter link equals more camber rise and more traction. Because a shorter link will make the rear of the car feel softer, it will better handle rough sections of the track.

Inside (on the shock tower).
Moving the inner camber link mount to the inside or outside hole will have the same effect as changing the length of the link on the hub.
Raising the link on the rear shock tower will keep the buggy flat through corners and have less camber rise; this is a good adjustment to make on a smooth track with high traction.
Lowering the link will add camber rise and make the car more forgiving when the track is rough.
Moving the link out on both the shock tower and the hub, which will keep the camber link the same length, will add support and make the rear of the car feel stiffer. suspension4

TOE-IN / TOE-OUT
This is the angle of the tires when compared to the centerline of the car. A tire that has zero toe is pointing straight ahead. Toe-in means that the tires point in toward each other, while toe-out is the opposite.

Front Toe
1/8-Scale Buggies almost always run toe-out in the front. Adding more toe-out will make the car smoother and easier to drive on big tracks, as well as increase low-speed steering by decreasing the car’s turning radius.
Likewise, decreasing toe-out (even to the point of running zero toe) will give the car more initial steering response. This is usually only done on tight, low-speed tracks.
Mark says, “If you run toe-in (at the front), your car won’t come out of the corner very well, and initial turn-in will be too darty. If you run toe-out, it will turn in and come out of the corner much smoother.”

Rear Toe
The rear of the car is much different, as toe-out is never used. Adding more rear toe-in will add overall rear traction, both in a straight line and during cornering.
On the flip side, less toe-in will increase steering since the rear tires will have less traction. Also, the rear suspension and driveshafts will be at less of an angle, which will help on rough sections of the track.
Mark says, “Nine times out of ten, I run maximum rear toe-in (on the Kyosho MP9, this is three degrees of toe-in per side). The only time I run less is in truggy, because there’s already so much grip.” Also, he suggests only changing the inner pivot blocks to adjust toe-in rather than using rear hubs with different angles of toe-in. Changing the rear hubs will increase the angle of the driveshaft joint and change how the car works. suspension5KICK-UP
Kick-up is the angle between the ground and the lower inner hinge pins on which the suspension arms swing. Altering kick-up will affect the car much like caster does. In addition, adding kick-up will make your bump higher and further. You should only consider decreasing kick-up when the track has few or no jumps. suspension6

SHOCK POSITION
Tower. Moving the shock in on the tower will make the shock feel more progressive i.e.; initially it will feel softer, but increasing in stiffness as the shock compresses. If the track is slippery, move the shock in on the tower to add body roll and overall traction.
Moving the shock outward will make the shock feel more linear. This will free up the car and make it jump much better. On a track with lots of grip, move your shocks out on the tower to reduce body roll.

Arm. Moving to a more inward shock location on the arm will make the buggy feel softer and less stable. For blown out tracks, this adjustment will help navigate bumps and ruts without hurting the car’s jumping performance as much as moving the shock inward on the tower.
An outer shock position on the arm will make the car rotate more during cornering, and make the buggy feel more stable. This comes at the expense of rough track performance.

SHOCKS
Shock Oil. Thicker shock oil will help the car to navigate larger jumps and bumps since the oil will slow the reaction of the shock. In hot weather, increase the weight of your shock oil to maintain the same damping characteristics.
Thinner shock oil will allow the shock to react more quickly, and help your buggy soak up smaller bumps and track imperfections. If your buggy works well in warm weather, switch to thinner shock oil in very cold conditions.
Mark explains, “Temperature is a huge part of choosing shock oil.”

Shock Pistons. Choosing the correct shock pistons is quite simple. On smooth tracks with big jumps, Mark suggests using smaller pistons to slow down the shock action. On rough tracks with fewer jumps, reach for pistons with larger holes to allow the shock to soak up the ruts.

Shock Springs. Mark doesn’t often change his shock springs to adjust his car. In fact, he suggests changing both the front and rear springs at the same time to maintain the same balance front to rear. If the track surface is slippery, go to lighter springs to create more body roll and slow the car’s reactions. On asphalt, grass or Astroturf tracks with tons of grip, use heavier springs at both ends of the car to resist traction rolling.

CONCLUSION
As you’ll notice, each adjustment sacrifices a particular handling trait to gain another. There’s no magic adjustment to make your car “super dialed”, so decide what your buggy needs to do differently, make changes to your car, and see if your lap times improve. This guide should serve as a perfect compliment to the most useful tool you’ll ever find in your RC career: practice.

                                                                                                                                                               

Source:

http:// Remote Control Toys on Sale

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

Miniature Wonders @ The Rc Drift Body Comp

I’m so glad I decided to go to the Hobby Garage in Kuki the other day. Had I not, I don’t think I would have ever understood what “custom” really means to RC car enthusiasts in Japan. If you thought what you saw in yesterday’s post was impressive, well all I can say is scroll down and be further surprised…I sure was once I had the chance to go through every car entered in the contest!

Check out this S13 body. So many cool details like the ground-scarping front lip spoiler, plenty of negative camber and the model-car equivalent of rolled fenders. It’s all about the tuck!

Next to it was this camo Onevia running even more camber, “bolted on” overfenders…

…and a pink engine. Despite only having 4-ignition leads and four intake runners on the plenum it did look more like an RB than an SR!

I guess if you want to place high at these sort of competitions, you really have to push your imagination and think outside the box. This beaten up S15 reminded me of what some of those crazy drifters end up doing to their cars at events like the Drift Matsuri in Ebisu Circuit.

Looks like it took some pretty big hits and a few excursions into the mud, but at least it’s still straight enough to drift!

We saw a little teaser image of this Toyota Estima minivan yesterday. Aside from the fact that it’s already quite cool that you can get these sort of bodies for 1/10th scale chassis…

…it obviously doesn’t stop owners taking them to the next level. This is probably inspired by those vans that show up at Daikoku PA on a Saturday night and blast out ridiculously loud music.

It even had a fully decked out trunk with big subwoofers and a functioning LCD screen. There were two smaller additional screens on either side of the van too. A constant power supply kept the mini-screens functioning and the music playing.

And if you think that’s wild take a look at this Subaru BRZ. This fully functional drift car was equipped with all sorts of cool touches…

…like the custom turbo boxer engine, angel eyes in the headlights….

…but most incredible of all was the custom drop top conversion. It took the owner eight months of hard work to design and build the mechanical servo-actuated roof and trunk! A second remote control is needed to actuate the opening and closing of the roof, trunk and hood.

But no matter how simple or complex the cars may be, each have their own appeal.

This “Arctic version” 180SX is one I really liked. The idea alone was so bizarre but so cool at the same time it was probably the one that made me smile the most.

And of course the details are painstakingly realistic!

Nomuken in the house! Well not really as he’s driving an 86 nowadays, but you know what I mean…

Not sure what the inspiration for this 86 was, it certainly does share some similarities with Orido’s D1 car but is seriously beefed up in the fender department.

Our very own Mad Mike should be very happy to see this particular FD!

Any DTM fans out there? Then this Alfa Romeo 155 V6 Ti inspired build…

…will be right down your street.

The Volklinger S14 we saw last year at Hellaflush Kansai and Slammed Society events had inspired lots of other military-themed cars, including scaled ones too of course.

There were a good couple of hours for us all to take closer look of the cars present and submit our votes.

Towards the end of the video presentation of the cars there was one last-minute addition…from me!

In the hope that I would get some time after the event to drift, I brought my brand new RTR-X Mustang from HPI that arrived the other day from the US. I thought it would be a great chance to break her in at a pro Japanese track and once the organizers heard I had a car of my own they let me add it to the line up.

So it got its own video presentation! Some of the guys there seemed to like the eight velocity stacks sticking out of the hood as well as the color matched wheels. It was a great moment; I almost felt accepted, like I was one of them. Unfortunately they all knew it was  completely stock and I hadn’t even turned a screw on it so I dropped the act and continued taking pictures.

Not before I had time to waste one battery though…we all need breaks right!

The owner of this Countach probably thought it would be a sacrilege to have a Lambo and not have the scissor doors open. So he fixed that, and you can now open and close them at the flick of a switch. He was even drifting it with the doors up…letting all the haters hate. That’s right!

Here is another Drift Matsuri missile special. It takes some real skills to make this sort of carnage look realistic…

…all the way down to the rust sport and the shattered glass.

You kyusha fans out there will love this S30 Fairlady Z. As the owner showed me on his phone, Linhbergh’s feature on “that 240Z” was the inspiration.

Pretty damn cool right?

After having shot each entrant’s car in detail I took a wonder over to the track side of the Hobby Garage, where things were very busy with lots of drifting, charging, fine tuning.

It’s there that I spotted even more cool builds, and it seems that most of the guys that were part of the Custom Body Contest had also brought…

…one or is some cases two or more other chassis and bodies to play with.

It’s almost unheard of to see anyone use a stock controller to drift cars at the track. Everyone sports the latest and most expensive commanders, usually just as accessorized as the cars and chassis themselves with carbon-look wraps and replacement steering “wheels.”

Some other cool cars I spotted on track were this pair of Toyotas, this MotorFIX-inspired Corolla…

…and this widebody slammed KP61 Starlet.

Later on in the afternoon it was time for the prizes to be handed out. The organizers of the event at the Hobby Garage had come up with a novel way of eliminating the finalists that didn’t make it to the top spot in the three different categories. If not unanimously voted the best, it was simply flushed down and dropped through a remote-operated trap door! (don’t worry there were a couple of pillows to cushion the fall)

The camo Onevia took the win in the S-chassis group…

…while the shakotan Z grabbed the top spot in the miscellaneous category.

Long and hard work obviously paid off as the top prize in the custom category went to the drop-top BRZ.

After the award ceremony everyone was invited to the main track…

…to join in a few slow parade laps…which quickly turned into a bit of hard drift session!

What a great Sunday out this turned out to be. It was the perfect example of how many different ways enthusiasts, or otakus in this case (!), can enjoy their passion for cars. http://Remote Control Toys on Sale                                                               Credits:    http://www.speedhunters.com/  http://